Rites of Passage I

Dozens of Rites of Passage On the Way to Adulthood

The long transition from the incompetence of infancy to the competence of a skilled, well-rounded, and confident adulthood, should provide many opportunities for demonstrating personal competence while discovering one’s own pace and direction of discovery and mastery over challenges. If a society — such as ours — is profoundly neglectful and negligent in providing for these successive rites and opportunities for competency acquisition and confirmation, it will be rewarded with lifelong adolescents who lack both competency and confidence.

Although it may never be too late to have a Dangerous Childhood, it may be too late to learn competencies at your peak learning window. That is a pity, but only one of many, and not to be cried over. If you are 30 or 40 years old or more, and still trying to find your “vision quest” or “rite of passage”, you have been ill treated by well-meaning parents and society. Do what you can to make up for it in yourself, but try not to perpetuate the crime on future generations.

Think of this analogy: Baby birds have to first crack their way out of their hard shells. Then they have to learn to leave the nest without killing themselves. They have to learn to fly, feed, survive. Then they must find mates, raise their young, migrate with the seasons, over and over again. In the same way, baby humans have a lifetime of competence learning and testing ahead of them.

Modern humans of affluent societies wish to spare their young from all of those difficulties. That is the worst thing they could do. Modern college professors too often tell students what to think rather than preparing them to competently mind-wrestle all comers. Such indoctrination — a hallmark of a modern university education — is likewise the worst possible approach. And so it goes, as the mass consensus culture takes the place of parents and schools, creating an artificial layer of delusion and “protection in numbers” around the citizen.

As new generations of incompetents work their way further into the control rooms of government and society, expect things to get harder for almost everyone. These are the times when you want maximum competence for yourself and those around you. More

It is easy to see that the numbers are against those who wish to bring about a Dangerous Society of Dangerous Children. For the Dangerous Child, there is no end to learning and the development and practise of competence, from birth until death. It is exactly that type of mindfulness to a child’s upbringing that most modern parents rebel against.

A brief hint of what we are talking about can be seen in the experience of the Robinson children. Arthur Robinson homeschooled his six children as a single father, using a self-teaching method of homeschooling that he devised himself. The children first taught themselves to learn, then taught themselves difficult subject matter — achieving college level mastery of calculus and physics by the age of 16.

But more, the Robinson children mastered the art of self-sufficiency in performing vital tasks on the family ranch/farm. Teaching themselves to be responsible for livestock and important household functions was likely as important as any part of their academic curriculum.

As the children aged, their level of responsibility for the household and ranch grew, along with their level of sophistication in study topics and materials. __ https://alfinnextlevel.wordpress.com/2014/02/07/who-stole-our-rites-of-passage/

Most parents who wish to raise Dangerous Children could glean a lot of good ideas from the Robinson experience, and the Robinson Curriculum.

As we wander more deeply into the theory and practise of The Dangerous Child Method, it will become clear that something more is involved than simply leading the child into self-teaching and self-development, and preparing him for professional, occupational, intellectual, and financial competence and self-sufficiency.

Dangerous Children are skilled in ways that most modern parents and educators would never imagine or think necessary. This is because most parents, educators, and other moderns suffer under the tunnel-vision delusion of the mass consensus culture. They cannot imagine a future for children that involves the transcending of the mass consensus. The very idea would frighten not only parents and educators, but anyone with a stake in modern media, academia, government, and popular culture.

To develop and maintain these many skills, Dangerous Children must undergo dozens of successive rights of passage, in every stage of his life.

We will look more deeply into the staging of competence rites as we look more closely at the curriculum concept, and how it applies to Dangerous Child training. It will quickly become obvious that once the child achieves a level of mastery in particular areas, he will be inventing his own curriculum — with assistance — for the rest of his life.

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