What Happens to Children Who Are Not Taught to Look After Themselves?

Awareness and Control
If a child has never learned to look out for herself, she is likely to find herself at the mercy of Muslim rape gangs, violent bullies, and all types of other predators.

In the short video clip to the left, we see a teenage girl walking through a veritable minefield, seemingly unaware of her predicament. Instead of moving away from the blow, she actually walks right into it! Then she proceeds to turn an oblivious back to further attacks! Whatever are they teaching children in schools these days? Very little that they need to know, apparently.

Dangerous Children learn to be “attack-proof.” Attack-proofing is a method of combined situational awareness and self-preservation. Here is a YouTube clip providing a few examples:



More video clips
Attack Proof Home

Attack-proofing school provides a full range of skills, including how to avoid the attack in the first place through awareness and maintaining a safe distance from attackers.

The “American Combato” system is another good system for Dangerous Children.

The main idea is to avoid and escape potential attacks. But if a Dangerous Child is caught in the middle of an attack that she cannot quickly escape, she should know how to control the situation as best she can, until an opening for escape reveals itself.

Too many modern children are like the girl in the top video clip: at the mercy of any predator who comes along.

Who is to blame? Obviously our entire politically correct culture is to blame, which denies the very real threats that are faced by young and old alike. Mainstream media, academia, governments at all levels, and popular culture are all oriented toward denying the threats which anyone with eyes can see.

A Dangerous Child is the mildest of the mild as long as allowed to go their own way. Would-be bullies, rapists, and “knock-out artists” will receive an unexpected surprise: Dangerous Children start out dangerous, and become more so the longer they live.

If you value political correctness more than your lives and the lives of your loved ones, simply accept things as they are. Otherwise, consider going Dangerous.

It is never too late to have a Dangerous Childhood. But the sooner you begin, the better for everyone.

Normal Childhood Development and The Dangerous Child

Early Childhood Developmental Milestones https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_development_stages
Early Childhood Developmental Milestones
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_development_stages

According to Wikipedia, this is what a 3 year old should be doing:

Three-year-old

[15][16] Physical

  • Growth is steady though slower than in first two years.
  • Adult height can be predicted from measurements of height at three years of age; males are approximately 53% of their adult height and females, 57%.
  • Legs grow faster than arms,
  • Circumference of head and chest is equal; head size is in better proportion to the body.
  • Baby fat” disappears as neck appears.
  • Posture is more erect; abdomen no longer protrudes.
  • Slightly knock-kneed.
  • can jump from low step
  • can stand up and walk around on tiptoes
  • “baby” teeth stage over.
  • Needs to consume approximately 6,300 kJ (1,500 calories) daily.

Motor development

  • Walks up and down stairs unassisted, using alternating feet; may jump from bottom step, landing on both feet.
  • Can momentarily balance on one foot.
  • Can kick big ball-shaped objects.
  • Needs minimal assistance eating.
  • Jumps on the spot.
  • Pedals a small tricycle.
  • Throws a ball overhand; aim and distance are limited.
  • Catches a large bounced ball with both arms extended.
  • Enjoys swinging on a swing.
  • Shows improved control of crayons or markers; uses vertical, horizontal and circular strokes.
  • Holds crayon or marker between first two fingers and thumb (tripod grasp), not in a fist as earlier.
  • Can turn pages of a book one at a time
  • Enjoys building with blocks.
  • Builds a tower of eight or more blocks.
  • Enjoys playing with clay; pounds, rolls, and squeezes it.
  • May begin to show hand dominance.
  • Carries a container of liquid, such as a cup of milk or bowl of water, without much spilling; pours liquid from pitcher into another container.
  • Manipulates large buttons and zippers on clothing.
  • Washes and dries hands; brushes own teeth, but not thoroughly.
  • Usually achieves complete bladder control during this time.

Cognitive development

  • Listens attentively to age-appropriate stories.
  • Makes relevant comments during stories, especially those that relate to home and family events.
  • Likes to look at books and may pretend to “read” to others or explain pictures.
  • Enjoys stories with riddles, guessing, and “suspense.”
  • Speech is understandable most of the time.
  • Produces expanded noun phrases: “big, brown dog.”
  • Produces verbs with “ing” endings; uses “-s” to indicate more than one; often puts “-s” on already pluralized forms: geeses, mices.
  • Indicates negatives by inserting “no” or “not” before a simple noun or verb phrase: “Not baby.”
  • Answers “What are you doing?”, “What is this?”, and “Where?” questions dealing with familiar objects and events.

__ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_development_stages

Every child will develop at his own pace, so don’t expect him to reach every developmental milestone for his age at exactly the same time as every other child. These are guidelines to use for children in western countries.

Below is an excerpt from JD Garcia’s advanced curriculum for children ages 3 – 6, from which the Dangerous Child Manual borrows in its own curricula choices for free range Dangerous Child education.

Physical Biological
Avg.
Level
Avg.
Age
Physical Theory Physical Practice Biological Theory Biological Practice
1.00 3.00 Cause and effect The lever The human body Body care
1.25 3.25 Clubs and poles Modifying trees and
branches
Animal bodies; small
domestic animals
How to care for a pet
1.50 3.50 Different stones and their
properties
Using stones Edible plants and their
properties
Gathering edible plants
and mushrooms
1.75 3.75 Shaping stone Building simple stone tools Edible animals and fish Hunting and fishing
2.00 4.00 Shaping wood with stone Using stone tools to
modifu poles and clubs
Food preparation and
preservation
Cleaning and preparing
small game and fish using
bone, wood, and stone
2.25 4.25 Handling fire Use of stone and wood to
control fire, use of fire to
harden spear points
Advanced food preparation Cooking vegetables, fish,
and meat on open fires
2.50 4.50 Advanced fire handling
and control combining
wood and stone tools,
theory and design
Hafted axes and choppers
are made; stone fire
carriers, simple weaving
and knotting of vines and
leather
Elementary tanning and
use of bone, vines, and
vegetable fiber
Skinning animals and fish,
preserving leather,
advanced cooking.
preparing vines and
vegetable fiber
2.75 4.75 The bow and fire-making Making bows and starting
fires
Advanced food
preparation; advanced
tanning and bone work
Advanced cooking; clothes
from animal hides; use of
sinew and thongs; hunting
with dogs
3.00 5.00 The use of clay and the
bow and arrow; design of
simple rafts
Making and baking clay
pots on an open fire;
making and using simple
bows and arrows
Advanced food preparation
including drying, smoking,
& curing; health care
Cooking, drying, and
smoking with clay pots;
preparing and using
medicinal herbs and
poultices
3.25 5.25 Advanced paleolithic stone
work of knives and axes;
advanced bow making;
advanced clay work
without wheel; large rafts
Making stone tools to
make other stone tools;
making advanced bows
and arrows; bellows and
advanced pottery; building
a large raft as a group
project
Gathering seeds and
planting edible plants;
basic first aid
Gardening; preparing soil
and cultivation; practice of
first aid
3.50 5.50 Neolithic tools;
construction of shelters;
advanced counting; how to
make a small dugout canoe
and paddle
Construction of simple
neolithic tools; the use of
tally marks and stored
pebbles; building a small
dugout canoe and paddle
The biological need for
shelter; building of lean-tos and simple teepees;
clothes for extreme cold;
simple agriculture
Construction of lean-tos
and teepees; more
advanced gardening;
making bone needles and a
parka
3.75 5.75 How to construct advanced
neolithic tools and work
stone and wood; more
advanced counting and
Arabic numbers to 10; how
to build a large dugout
canoe
Building advanced
neolithic tools; working
wood, simple carpentry,
building semi-permanent
structures; advanced
tallying systems; building a
large dugout canoe
How to make boots and
moccasins from leather and
plant fiber; how to know
when to plant and when to
harvest; taking care of
goats and sheep
Construction of complete
wardrobes of leather, plant,
and animal fiber; more
advanced gardening and
animal husbandry

Psychosocial

Integration
Avg.
Level
Avg.
Age
Psychosocial Theory Pyschosocial Practice Integrative Theory Integrative Practice
1.00 3.00 How to communicate Exchange of information Ethics of personal
obligation
Free-form drawing and
painting, simple songs
1.25 3.25 Clubs and poles Repeat same message from
different source
Truth and lying, paleolithic
stories
Free-form drawing and
painting, paleolithic
stories, drums
1.50 3.50 Games of information Teams for sending and
receiving messages
Advantages of cooperating
vs competing; paleolithic
stories
Songs, dancing, drawing,
painting, telling stories
1.75 3.75 Making pictures for
information
communication
Drawing picture stories Obligations of making
oneself understood
Free-form art, stick-figure
drawing for stories
2.00 4.00 Advanced picture stories Making up stories with
pictures
Ethics of separating fact
from fiction; paleolithic
stories
Wood carving and free-form painting; paleolithic
stories created and drawn
2.25 4.25 Picture symbols which
stand for complex events
Team communications
games and “charades”
using picture symbols
The difference between a
symbol and the thing it
symbolizes; paleolithic
stories
Charcoal drawing on bark
and stone; universal
religious symbols; creating
stories
2.50 4.50 Advanced picture symbols
and counting
Making up stories by
stringing together picture
symbols which everyone
can understand
Creation myths of
paleolithic people
Making up creation myths
and testing them
2.75 4.75 Rebus writing combined
with picture writing
Making up stories with
rebus and picture writing
Advanced creation myths
of Native Americans and
some religious beliefs,
symbols
Native American art and
what it expresses; free-form art for what students
value
3.00 5.00 The notion of an alphabet
and sound symbols
Stringing sound symbols
together to make a word
The religions of native
Americans and the
evolutionary ethic
Percussion instruments,
music, carving, dance, and
art to express religious
feelings
3.25 5.25 Reading advanced
paleolithic stories with
evolutionary ethical theme
Writing simple stories and
accounts using alphabet,
rebus writing, or pictures
as desired
The importance of
separating truth from
fiction in our writing to
avoid misleading others
Late paleolithic art and
religion; student’s
expression of his own
feelings about them
3.50 5.50 Reading stories and history
of early neolithic life with
evolutionary ethics theme
More writing of stories and
accounts using alphabet,
rebus writing, and pictures
as desired
Simple analysis of
neolithic culture and
religions in light of the
evolutionary ethic
Neolithic art and stone
carving; clay figurines;
self-expression of students
3.75 5.75 Reading more complex
stories of neolithic life
about religion and
creativity in ancient Jericho
and Mesopotamia
More writing of stories and
accounts using alphabet
and rebus writing, but no
pictures, show difficulty of
communicating numerical
concepts over 10
Analysis of why neolithic
culture advanced so slowly
before the beginning of
Sumer; the energy that
went into religious ritual &
the corrupt priestly
bureaucracy
The flute and harp and the
neolithic music possible
for them; advanced
neolithic art and religion;
self-expression in all art
media

__ John David Garcia Curriculum ages 3-6
You can see that this curriculum goes far beyond Waldorf and Montessori “experiential” methods in developing the child’s physical, mental, and psychosocial integration. It is important to emphasise moral and executive function development at the same time, given the advanced skills training the child is receiving.

The Garcia curriculum is meant to encourage early mental and physical development, but unlike the Dangerous Child Method, it doesn’t start until age 3. A Dangerous Child begins his training at birth, preferably before — even before conception. More on that approach later.

Conventional dumbed-down schooling and child-raising involves immersing the child deeply into the consensual delusion, shaping the child to become a lifelong incompetent adolescent who requires spoonfeeding her entire life. That is not the Dangerous Child way.

Dangerous Children should be kept away from television and most popular music and entertainment as much as possible until he has developed broad skills competence — physical, mental, and emotional — and accompanying self confidence. He should be capable of distinguishing between constructive and destructive lifestyles and modes of thinking. He should be well on his way toward being a natural philosopher and well innoculated from becoming an ideologue.

He will need to interact with the larger, delusional worldview eventually, so preparations for that interaction should be deliberate, measured, careful, and lifelong. Whether he goes to college and professional/graduate school, or starts a business dealing with persons from many backgrounds, he will need to face those new worlds from a position of confidence and competence, so as not to be knocked around by bullies of any kind.

That type of competence and confidence takes time to build, so it is best to begin early. Between birth and three years old, Dangerous Children are building preparatory skills, even when at play, virtually every waking moment. These foundations are immersed in games and play with the goal of reinforcing and building onto the infant’s natural love for learning and interaction with loved ones. The child associates learning with fun and personal empowerment — unless grownups do something stupid to make her think otherwise.

Remember: No television, no violent videogames, no dumbed-down popular music or culture. Those are all distractions that push the child into the consensual delusion long before she is ready for it. A few years of special care will yield a lifetime of dividends.