Why are Dangerous Children Taught to Build Their Own Weapons?

Hand Held Plasma Rifle / Railgun https://www.yahoo.com/tech/s/3d-printing-used-first-real-handheld-railgun-fires-134325053.html
Hand Held Plasma Rifle / Railgun
https://www.yahoo.com/tech/s/3d-printing-used-first-real-handheld-railgun-fires-134325053.html

The weapon above is a 3D printed railgun / plasma rifle capable of firing projectiles of graphite, aluminum, copper-coated tungsten, and teflon/plasma rods. You cannot buy such a weapon in stores. But you can build one, if you know how.

Using a combination of 3D printing and widely available components, the man built a functioning handheld railgun that houses six capacitors and delivers more than 3,000 kilojoules of energy per shot. What does it shoot, you might be wondering? So far he has tested the gun using metal rods made of graphite, aluminum and copper-coated tungsten, like the ones pictured below.
__ https://www.yahoo.com/tech/s/3d-printing-used-first-real-handheld-railgun-fires-134325053.html

We know that 3D printed firearms are old hat, with the 3D designs available on the internet.

But firearms were build by hand long before Samuel Colt standardised their production in factories. A good metalwork shop can produce large numbers of high quality custom firearms using traditional machining techniques.

But for firearms, it is the combination of additive and subtractive manufacturing that offers the greatest versatility and utility. Now that 3D printing in metals — and multitudes of other materials — is becoming more common, the best weapons makers and designers will need to learn to work with both types of “gunsmithing.”

Yet, we know that in many situations, plasma rifles and firearms are not the appropriate weapon for either offensive or defensive operations. Knives, compound bows, compressed air weapons, crossbows, simple staffs, spears, javelins, etc. etc. can be made by hand from commonly available materials by children who are quite young.

If you look within the JD Garcia curriculum for ages 3-6, you can find the early rudimentary training for simple weapons making:

Physical Biological
Avg.
Level
Avg.
Age
Physical Theory Physical Practice Biological Theory Biological Practice
1.00 3.00 Cause and effect The lever The human body Body care
1.25 3.25 Clubs and poles Modifying trees and
branches
Animal bodies; small
domestic animals
How to care for a pet
1.50 3.50 Different stones and their
properties
Using stones Edible plants and their
properties
Gathering edible plants
and mushrooms
1.75 3.75 Shaping stone Building simple stone tools Edible animals and fish Hunting and fishing
2.00 4.00 Shaping wood with stone Using stone tools to
modifu poles and clubs
Food preparation and
preservation
Cleaning and preparing
small game and fish using
bone, wood, and stone
2.25 4.25 Handling fire Use of stone and wood to
control fire, use of fire to
harden spear points
Advanced food preparation Cooking vegetables, fish,
and meat on open fires
2.50 4.50 Advanced fire handling
and control combining
wood and stone tools,
theory and design
Hafted axes and choppers
are made; stone fire
carriers, simple weaving
and knotting of vines and
leather
Elementary tanning and
use of bone, vines, and
vegetable fiber
Skinning animals and fish,
preserving leather,
advanced cooking.
preparing vines and
vegetable fiber
2.75 4.75 The bow and fire-making Making bows and starting
fires
Advanced food
preparation; advanced
tanning and bone work
Advanced cooking; clothes
from animal hides; use of
sinew and thongs; hunting
with dogs
3.00 5.00 The use of clay and the
bow and arrow; design of
simple rafts
Making and baking clay
pots on an open fire;
making and using simple
bows and arrows
Advanced food preparation
including drying, smoking,
& curing; health care
Cooking, drying, and
smoking with clay pots;
preparing and using
medicinal herbs and
poultices
3.25 5.25 Advanced paleolithic stone
work of knives and axes;
advanced bow making;
advanced clay work
without wheel; large rafts
Making stone tools to
make other stone tools;
making advanced bows
and arrows; bellows and
advanced pottery; building
a large raft as a group
project
Gathering seeds and
planting edible plants;
basic first aid
Gardening; preparing soil
and cultivation; practice of
first aid
3.50 5.50 Neolithic tools;
construction of shelters;
advanced counting; how to
make a small dugout canoe
and paddle
Construction of simple
neolithic tools; the use of
tally marks and stored
pebbles; building a small
dugout canoe and paddle
The biological need for
shelter; building of lean-tos and simple teepees;
clothes for extreme cold;
simple agriculture
Construction of lean-tos
and teepees; more
advanced gardening;
making bone needles and a
parka
3.75 5.75 How to construct advanced
neolithic tools and work
stone and wood; more
advanced counting and
Arabic numbers to 10; how
to build a large dugout
canoe
Building advanced
neolithic tools; working
wood, simple carpentry,
building semi-permanent
structures; advanced
tallying systems; building a
large dugout canoe
How to make boots and
moccasins from leather and
plant fiber; how to know
when to plant and when to
harvest; taking care of
goats and sheep
Construction of complete
wardrobes of leather, plant,
and animal fiber; more
advanced gardening and
animal husbandry

Tool-making and weapons-making go hand in hand. This is natural, since virtually any tool can be used on the spare of the moment as an improvised weapon. Dangerous Children learn early, how to make weapons and how to improvise weapons from everyday objects.

They are not taught to build firearms, plasma rifles, railguns, explosives, etc. until they are deemed emotionally and developmentally mature enough to know how and when to use such weapons wisely and safely.

Not all Dangerous Children will learn to build weapons such as missile launchers and remotely controlled armed drones. As mentioned in an earlier posting, Dangerous Children tend to specialise, based upon their innate aptitudes, inclinations, and levels of emotional development and displayed wisdom.

For most Dangerous Children, their words and non-violent actions will have the most potent effect upon the world that they will require. That is as it should be. Only when pressed beyond reasonable alternatives will most Dangerous Children display a covert prowess in controlled violence and mayhem.

But in the end, we are all evolved from killers, else we would not be here at all. Violence — including lethal violence — will play a role in the coming expansion of an abundant human future.

Pacifists are not truly pacifists, if they are still alive. They have simply not thought the matter through yet — or have not yet been confronted by the harsh realities that await.

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