What is the Reason for Living?

Bringing up a Dangerous Child is always challenging, often thrilling, and sometimes terrifying. Most of us have come to terms with the reasons we are doing this and the other important things in our lives. But the Dangerous Child has not had our experiences or had the chance to test different perspectives and attitudes against the real world. An essential part of Dangerous Child training is inserting “big picture” concepts regularly, to make the child comfortable seeing his own life from an eagle’s eye perspective.

Ikigai: Reason for Being
https://singularityhub.com/2018/06/15/the-more-people-with-purpose-the-better-the-world-will-be/

The ability to step outside one’s own life and observe what one is doing and where one is heading, is invaluable in the discovery of one’s own purpose, or reason for being. This purpose or reason is one’s orienting platform and launching pad to the future.

Ultimately, having a purpose ignites meaning and lasting happiness. It means waking up in the morning with a sense of anticipation for the day. After all, a human life is far too precious to be spent on meaningless or mediocre goals. __ https://singularityhub.com/2018/06/15/the-more-people-with-purpose-the-better-the-world-will-be/

Here is an exercise from Peter Diamandis meant to help a person to discover personal goals which they would find compelling and sustaining:

Step one: Write down the top three items you are most excited about or get you most riled up (that you want to solve).

Step two: For each of the three problems listed above, ask the following six questions and score each from 1-10.
(1 = small difference; 10 = big difference)

ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS
1. If at the end of [a given time] you had made a significant dent in this area, how proud would you feel?
2. Given the resources you have today, what level of impact could you make in the next three years if you solved this problem?
3. Given the resources you expect to have in 10 years, what level of impact could you make in a 3-year period?
4. How well do I understand the problem?
5. How emotionally charged (excited or riled up) am I about this?
6. Will this problem get solved with or without you involved?

TOTAL = Add up your scores and identify the idea with the highest score. This is your winner for now. Does this one intuitively feel right to you? __ Motivating Power

The results of this exercise will be different at age 10 than at age 18. And far different still at the age of 30 or 40. But it is crucial that Dangerous Children begin to think in terms of setting self-motivating goals from an early age.

Jordan Peterson is famous for his emphasis on striving for meaning and purpose rather than striving for happiness. Below is a video segment from a lecture, with some ideas on living a meaningful life:

Peterson’s “self-authoring software” and “Understand Myself” self-assessment will help Dangerous Children and others to learn where they are strong and weak, and to better visualise themselves as they set goals and move into the future.

This type of honest self-assessment and realistic projection of one’s goal-driven efforts into the future, combine to provide one with more realistic maps for navigating their lives.

Dangerous Children master at least three different ways of financial self-support by the age of eighteen. But they will not be content with just being financially self-supporting. They never stop learning and they never stop setting goals.

Should Dangerous Children Follow Their Passion?

Once a youth reaches the place where his future is in his own hands, as long as his “passion” is informed by a deep wisdom inside himself, then why not?

In a previous post we looked at Mike Rowe’s advice: “Don’t follow your passion!” But we should be clear that Rowe was talking to today’s average sheltered, pampered, mis-educated young person, with essentially no real world experience or savvy. A Dangerous Child with at least three self-supporting skills mastered and tucked under his belt is in an altogether different category. With his broad range of hard-won competencies, the Dangerous Child has a good idea what to expect in the broader world — and is fairly well set to begin dealing with it.

But for ordinary youth, following their passion is more likely to be a recipe for disaster.

When I say, “don’t follow your passion,” some people get upset because they think I am saying, “don’t follow the goal of being passionate about your work.” But I’m not saying this. Passion is great. I just don’t see a lot of evidence that passion is something existing naturally, waiting to be discovered. It takes hard work and planning to develop.

… we rarely talk about what true passion feels like. The sensation of excitement about a particular idea is often a different sensation than the type of deep passion that drives people into a fulfilling career. Excitement comes and goes. True passion arises after you’ve put in the long hours to really become a craftsman in your field and can then leverage this value to really have an impact, to gain autonomy and respect, to control your occupational destiny.

… there is no special passion waiting for you to discover. Passion is something that is cultivated. It can be cultivated in many, many different fields. Therefore, it doesn’t make sense to say, “I don’t know what my passion is.” What does make sense is to say, “I haven’t yet cultivated a passion, I should really focus down on a small number of things and start this process.” __ https://www.theminimalists.com/cal/

More: To find the work you love, don’t follow your passion.

As Mike Rowe said in the video above: Don’t follow your passion. But always take it with you.

For generations now, parents have trusted the raising and education of their children to large institutions which are indifferent (at best) to the ultimate fate of these children. Kids deserve better.

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