Bits of Parenting Advice from the Mainstream

Writer Christina DesMarais contributes to Inc. magazine. Several of her pieces have to do with parenting from a scientific perspective. Some of this advice is quite good. Here is a sampling:

Parents of Successful Kids Do These Things

  • They use an authoritative parenting style.
  • They travel with their children.*
  • They don’t lie*
  • They speak with a certain tone of voice
  • They have conversations with kids*
  • They get kids involved in the arts*
  • They play card games with their kids.
  • They exercise regularly.
  • They eat meals with their kids.
  • They limit screen time*
  • They don’t spank
  • They’re warm and accepting*
  • They make sure kids get enough sleep*
  • They play with their kids*
  • They don’t overshare [about their kids] online

Sources: Here, here, and here

Christina backs up each of her recommendations with scientific sources. None of the advice is bad. I have put a star next to the items which seem particularly good overall.

Below you will find an assortment of other snippets of advice from Christina. Feel free to apply it or not, according to your own situation. The idea is to listen to strategies that work for a variety of people, just in case something they do will also work for you.

Take small but concrete steps to turn large visions into reality

“Large visions or dreams can be very daunting, which is why so many people will live their lives without even attempting to realize them. I have found that taking small but concrete steps towards my visions leads to relatively quick and tangible rewards.

If it can be done in a minute, do it now

“The best productivity advice I’ve received (and put into practice every day) is that if something comes across your desk that will take less than 60 seconds to complete, do it immediately.

Set aside a few minutes each night to reflect on all of the day’s events

“As I do so, I jot down in a journal the biggest takeaways from each day in an effort to retain lessons learned.

Say no often

“Focus on the trade-off. The more I think about what I’m giving up when I say ‘yes’ to something, the easier it is to say ‘no.’

Schedule time for self-care, both physically and mentally

“I specifically designate time in my calendar each day to work some sort of physical activity into my afternoon, and I prefer to spend this time alone. Whether through a full workout or simply a walk around the perimeter of the office, I find that being on my own during this time helps me think clearly without distractions.

Make the bed

“Making the bed each morning is the easiest way to start your day with a win.

Make connections

“I regularly invest 15 minutes in a day to talk with someone whom I typically wouldn’t talk with but is related or has some interest in something I am focused on–this could be either professionally or personally.

Make time for music

“Keeping a positive attitude about work is important to me. Positivity helps you better connect with colleagues, customers, and partners, and it makes you more memorable in their eyes. To stay positive, I make time for music every day.

Get outside your comfort zone

“Embrace the unexpected and pursue the unfamiliar. I try to do, read, listen to, watch (or even eat) something new every day. Whether that’s related to my professional development or personal enjoyment. I’ve observed over my career that those who are able to draw from a vast base of knowledge or variety of experiences have an advantage.

Read before picking up a device

“Every morning, before reaching for any electronic devices, I like to read for 30-40 minutes, generally books on philosophy or a good biography. Most recently, I read Seneca: Letters from a Stoic.”

Stretch, breathe, swim, and set goals

“It’s important to have a clear mind each morning in order to have the most productive day possible. I wake up each morning and have 15 minutes to myself to stretch and be aware of my breathing to relax my mind. Afterwards, I get my body moving by swimming for 30 minutes in order to increase my mental wellness, improve blood flow, and get ready to tackle the day.

__ https://www.inc.com/christina-desmarais/31-simple-daily-habits-that-separate-high-achievers-from-everyone-else.html

Remember the difference between a productive innovator and an executive decision maker. Christina’s advice in the article above suggests that she is more of an executive decision maker, constantly distracted by meetings, interruptions, and memos. Deep-working innovators and creators will have a slightly different approach to getting things done.

It is hard enough raising an ordinary child to be successful. How much harder it is to raise a Dangerous Child, with all the sharp but polished edges that implies. So first learn the basics well, then refine your approach with the greater project in mind.

The spirit and determination for a successful life must come from within the child — you cannot provide it. But you can provide the wisdom of your experience to help shape and nurture that spirit and determination as it grows and becomes manifest. __ Source

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