Why Dangerous Children Will Not Grow Obsolete

Dangerous Children are Both Playful and Inquisitive

Asking questions is one of the most important ways that children learn. Ordinary preschool children ask about 100 questions per day. But by the time they reach middle school they have essentially stopped asking questions.

Why Do Ordinary Kids Stop Asking Questions?
Source: Right Question Institute

This is one of the tragedies of modern schooling and child-raising. Something happens when children go to conventional schools, which stamps almost all the inquisitiveness out of them. The suppression of inquisitiveness in children goes a long way toward making sure that they will grow obsolete far too quickly.

The world and workplace of the future will demand that its workers and entrepreneurs be observant, nimble, and able to anticipate important trends and changes that are likely to take place. If children and youth never learned to ask the important questions about things and events happening around them, they will be lost and at the mercy of prevailing powers.

Five Basic Questions

Children can learn any number of ways to approach new phenomena, but to begin with it is best to give them a simple checklist of questions to ask, and make sure they acquire sufficient practise to make it a skillful habit.

Evidence: How do we know what’s true or false? What evidence counts?
Viewpoint: How might this look if we stepped into other shoes, or looked at it from a different direction?
Connection: Is there a pattern? Have we seen something like this before?
Conjecture: What if it were different?
Relevance: Why does this matter? __ From Chapter 1 in “A More Beautiful Question,” by Warren Berger

Student Engagement Over Time
Gallup

The graph above from a Gallup study reveals the steady decline in student engagement over time. This says more about teaching methods in conventional schools than it does about the students themselves.

Along with Inquisitiveness, A Sense of Playfulness is Indispensable

Play is central to the learning processes of very young children. And even as children grow older, play is a key component to learning foundational skills and for developing latent talents.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena discovered that recent engineering hires who were meant to replace older engineers who were retiring, did not know how to solve basic engineering problems with which they were confronted on the job. After investigating the reasons for this disturbing shortcoming of new engineers, they discovered something important about the type of engineers they needed to hire:

The JPL managers went back to look at their … retiring engineers… They found that in their youth, their older, problem-solving employees had taken apart clocks to see how they worked, or made soapbox derby racers, or built hi-fi stereos, or fixed appliances. The younger engineering school graduates who had also done these things, who had played with their hands, were adept at the kind of problem solving that management sought. Those that hadn’t, generally were not. __ From “Play” by Stuart Brown MD with Christopher Vaughan

The same problem with new hires and recent graduates is being seen in workplaces across the US as young people who were never given the experience of creative play and tinkering are hitting the workplace. People who developed the skills of improvising and tinkering in their youth will never forget these playful forms of problem-solving. Those who passed through their youthful years without developing these skills are at a serious practical disadvantage in a world of accelerating change, with newer unconventional problems popping up regularly.

Another example:

[Nate] Jones ran a machine shop that specialized in precision racing and Formula One tires, and he had noticed that many of the new kids coming to work in the shop were … not able to problem solve… After questioning the new kids and older employees, Jones found that those who had worked and played with their hands as they were growing up were able to “see solutions” that those who hadn’t worked with their hands could not. __ Play

We know that children pass through windows of sensitive neurological development as they grow older. If certain “connections” in the brain are not made during these sensitive periods of development, it will be more difficult — if not impossible — for many of these young people to make these important connections when they are older.

Asking the Right Questions Meshes with Skillful Improvisation

Solving problems in the real world is altogether different from scoring points on multiple choice exams in school. Improvisational problem-solving facilitated by asking the right questions makes a worker or an entrepreneur far more valuable and sought after in the real world — especially in a world of accelerating change where novel problems are always appearing.

Children and youth who develop the skills of asking good questions combined with competent and playful improvisation will find themselves in demand. And if these youth and young adults have also learned how to manage their finances, they are likely to eventually fined themselves reasonable well off financially.

Dangerous Children learn to master at least three means of financial independence by the age of 18 years. Besides having multiple skills that are sought after in the marketplace, they have also learned to manage the finances of a household and of multiple small businesses by that same age.

But that is just the beginning of what makes Dangerous Children skilled and nimble in this world or virtually any other human world. It is never too late for a Dangerous Childhood, but the sooner begun, the better.

More information on questions, and play:

Right Question Institute
National Institute for Play

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Dangerous Entrepreneurs

More people become millionaires by owning their own business than any other way.

More

Dangerous Children study and practise investing and small business entrepreneurship from the age of 8 or earlier. Doing deals is at the heart of the human enterprise, whenever one human interacts with another. The Dangerous Child Method is all about creating Dangerous Entrepreneurs, as well as other dangerous types of humans.

An entrepreneur is anyone who is independent, creative, inventive, and willing to take risks… Most great entrepreneurs simply love what they do — whether it’s problem-solving, building something from the ground up, or a passion for their product or service. __ Sam Zell in “Am I Being Too Subtle?”

Dangerous Children are inventive risk-takers, independent and contrarian to the core. As such they do not fit in very well at today’s groupthink universities, government agencies, conformist media conglomerates, or the rent-seeking echo choirs of most corporate cultures eager to feast on government contracts.

Today’s societal compulsion to “send every child to college” is cutting the legs out from under future innovation and business skills, not to mention its damaging effects on the crafts and trades. With a college loan debt in excess of $1 trillion, the US is beginning to suffer from this financial (and human) misallocation in a significant way.

Venture capitalist Peter Thiel has been experimenting with a $100,000 fellowship for selected young people, to encourage them to build, invent, and sell new things rather than to sit in classrooms and receive an academic lobotomy.

College is not necessary for one to become a successful entrepreneur — and in many cases it is an active impediment. Entrepreneurial skills can be best learned by an on-the-job learn as you go approach.

Hard core entrepreneurs tend to come up with their own ways of matching supply with demand, and meeting their customers’ and clients’ needs. But sometimes a would-be entrepreneur needs to borrow an idea to get started. There are a number of franchises with entry fees of less than $4,000.

Dangerous Children master at least three ways of financial independence by the age of 18. Whatever skills or types of expertise they develop, business skills will increase the profitability of those skills.

Once a youth achieves financial independence, he can choose and navigate his own pathway through life — through a wide range of businesses, through the professions, via creative arts, through science and technical occupations — or even in government work if absolutely necessary.

Entrepreneurs are inherently dangerous to top-heavy societies such as one finds in Europe and the Anglosphere. This is why most unprincipled politicians (Obama, Clintons, etc.) seem to reduce overall opportunities in society by diverting massive amounts of funds to parasitic rent-seeking political allies.

Things are even worse in corrupt states of the emerging and third worlds such as Russia, China, India, Brasil, the African dictatorships, etc., entrepreneurs must be prepared to pay large bribes at different levels of government just to get started. Successful entrepreneurs that are not deeply connected to top level government officials walk around with a bulls-eye on their backs. Entrepreneurs in Russia who refuse to pay the mafia are typically shot down as examples to others.

If you can imagine a society mostly composed of independent entrepreneurs and their skilled and resourceful employees, you can imagine a society with fewer problems with unemployment, drugs, crime, and government corruption. Imagine a society where even the least-paid labourer can earn a living income at least three different ways, and you can imagine a society with far less insecurity and anxiety.

For that to happen, changes must take place at both the top and the bottom. At the top, taxes and regulations must be streamlined severely, and tailored to small businesses, entrepreneurs, craftsmen, and tradesmen.

At the bottom, children must be taught to teach themselves, discipline themselves to follow self-developed plans, to understand money and business, and to be independent, creative, contrarian, thinkers and doers.

In the middle are the people who raise the children and who run the businesses, do the work, and invent new ways of doing things.

Such a society is immersed in creative destruction and disruptive innovation. It is, by definition, “dangerous” to the current elites who maintain their wealth and influence via rent-seeking.

University’s False Promise and the Dangerous Child’s Reply

College is a place where young people go to binge, fornicate, receive an academic lobotomy, and become burdened by insurmountable debt — all in the quest for increasingly worthless diplomas. __ Al Fin

Wage Advantage from College Diploma Shrinking

College Advantage Shrinking
Image Source

Wages for college graduates across many majors have fallen since the 2007-09 recession, according to an unpublished analysis by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce in Washington using Census bureau figures. Young job-seekers appear to be the biggest losers.
__ Bloomberg

Even in crucial fields such as engineering, physical sciences, health sciences, computer science, and agriculture, wages for college grads have been dropping.

Image Source

Some majors are bucking the wage-stagnation trend. An experienced petroleum engineering major earned $179,000 a year on average in 2015, up $46,000 from five years prior, according to the Georgetown analysis. Beyond those with special technical skills, philosophy and public policy majors have also seen their earnings rise. __ Bloomberg

Meanwhile, student loan debt across society soars:

Skyrocketing Student Debt

The Real World Needs Competent People with Applicable Skills

Look at the starting wages for various degrees in the graphics above — then consider that a good welder or oil field worker can earn over $100,000 before he turns 21, if he is given a head start! Such lucrative skills can be learned by youth in high school before turning 18.

Another high school program that trains future oil field workers.
A list of 27 good paying jobs that do not require 4 year degrees

This doesn’t mean that all young people should be shunted toward blue collar and mid-level jobs and professions. That is not what Dangerous Child training is about. Instead, Dangerous Child training is aimed at training competent and confident young people who are equipped to shape their own futures from the onset of adulthood. Some Dangerous Children will go into the trades, some will choose higher education — some may even choose government work! The goal of Dangerous Child training is to give the ownership of that choice to the child himself, along with plenty of backdoors in case the first choice doesn’t work out. And all of that without a mountain of debt!

Dangerous Children master at least three ways of achieving financial independence by the time they turn 18 yo. Not all of them will earn him $100,000 a year off the bat. But by combining practical competence with business and entrepreneurial skills — that are also learned before turning 18 — Dangerous Children are capable of building businesses that can earn well over a $million a year.

Sure, businesses have to pay taxes, labour, rents, and so forth, but Dangerous Children learn how to economise on such expenses by the age of 12. Most of them get plenty of practise at running a small business by the time they reach 18 years, so they are ready to start building a future out of the gate.

A Dangerous Childhood Depends Upon a Child’s Ability to Teach Himself

Modern society too often looks at children as incompetent nuisances, who must be sheltered from the real world until they turn 18 — at which point they are thrown into a corrupt and undisciplined world completely unprepared for what they will face. The end result of such an approach is a growing herd of sheep-like young people who are still incompetent, and likely to stay that way. By default, these sheep are closely guided in their tastes, interests, and “relevant causes” by faux experts in media, academia, and government and by celebrity figures around the world.

A Dangerous Child, on the other hand, learns to teach himself from an early age. By teaching himself to develop a broad competence in practical skills as well as in scholarship, a Dangerous Child develops confidence in his own ability to solve increasingly important problems and to build things of increasing complexity that actually work.

A self-taught person who possesses both self discipline and self confidence will not be swayed by popular appeals to group status or celebrity appeal. He will be a contrarian thinker who works things out for himself, impervious to the herd mentality of a corrupt, groupthinking culture.

Getting Real About Life in the World

If you are young and not Dangerous, your dreams and passions are almost certainly pathetic shite. If you are not Dangerous, you have probably never been exposed to the full-spectrum world out there. So, here’s a word of advice: Don’t follow your passion. Discover the real world first, then you can start to work out how you might fit in that world.

Mike Rowe is a TV personality who championed the concept of “dirty jobs” — jobs that frighten or repel most people, need to be done, typically pay well, and are very low down on the list of most persons’ “dream jobs.”

Mike Rowe has a foundation, the mikeroweWORKS Foundation, which is dedicated to promoting “skills jobs,” work that doesn’t require a 4 year college diploma — but instead requires real world competence and skills.

* A trillion dollars in student loans.
* Record high unemployment.
* Three million good jobs that no one seems to want.

The mikeroweWORKS Foundation started the Profoundly Disconnected® campaign to challenge the absurd belief that a four-year degree is the only path to success. The Skills Gap is here, and if we don’t close it, it’ll swallow us all. Which is a long way of saying, we could use your help… __ MikeRowWORKS Foundation

Skilled workers are growing closer to retirement age. Farmers, welders, skilled construction workers, skilled maintenance workers, and a host of other pivotal “dirty jobs” requiring competence and expertise are growing older and retiring. They are not being replaced fast enough with good enough young replacements.

… the hardest segment of the workforce for employers to staff with skilled talent hasn’t been registered nurses or engineers or even web developers. It’s been the skilled trades – the welders, electricians, machinists, etc. that are so prevalent in manufacturing and construction.

But if these skilled-trades workers are difficult to find now, as Manpower MAN +2.25%’s survey indicates, just wait a few years. The skills gap is likely to become more acute.

In 2012, 53 percent of skilled-trade workers in the U.S. were 45 years and older, according to EMSI, and 18.6 percent were between the ages of 55 and 64. (We are using the Virginia Manufacturers Association’s definition of skilled trades, which encompasses 21 particular occupations.) __ Joshua Wright

Forbes
Forbes

Too many young people cannot focus on one thing long enough to develop competent expertise, cannot go long enough without using drugs to pass either a scheduled or a random urine test, and cannot be trusted with hazardous machinery, materials, or tools. But if young people were exposed to the real world of responsibilities and consequences early enough to understand what it takes to earn, save, and go independent — their attitudes might well undergo a significant adjustment for the better.

A lot of the “dirty-jobs” people that Rowe highlighted on his TV show were multi-millionaires. The money goes to where needs are filled, and glamour often doesn’t enter into it.

Rowe is an advocate for blue-collar workers and is the CEO of the MikeRoweWorks Foundation, which he started in 2008 to help connect people with skilled jobs. Rowe also uses it to challenge, what he calls, America’s “dysfunctional relationship with work.” __ Source

Mike Rowe has some unconventional ideas which could contribute to the improvement and prosperity of virtually any country’s educational policies. And he offers these ideas freely to every US president — whether Democrat or Republican.

“When the dust settles, and The White House gets a new tenant, I’ll make the same offer to President Trump that I did to President Obama — to assist as best I can in any attempt to reinvigorate the skilled trades, and shine a light on millions of good jobs that no one seems excited about pursuing,” he said. __ Variety

Mike Rowe wants to match people with jobs. But he also wants to improve skills training in the US, starting at the high school age level. Because of this and many of his other ideas, Rowe is light years ahead of most of his contemporaries in television and the entertainment media when it comes to contributing to useful change.

Mike Rowe goes beyond the surface fluff of politics, media, academia, and activism, and gets down and dirty in the real world. He is opening minds one by one. Perhaps if President-Elect Trump decides to give him a louder voice, he can open more minds and empower more people to develop practical skills and find ways of using them profitably. Still, there are a lot of things that Mike Rowe knows which he cannot easily communicate to modern youth and workers, raised as they have been in a milieu of short-attention-span frivolity and superficiality. But he does us all a service by continuing in what he is doing.

Dangerous Children Start Earlier and Go Much Farther

Dangerous Children know more than just blue collar skills, of course, although they cannot achieve their fullest potential without developing a wide range of practical skills and competencies — regardless of what careers, professions, vocations, and working pathways they may choose. And Dangerous Children have the utmost respect for other people who master practical skills, do dirty jobs, run their own businesses, and personally keep communities and societies running through their own competence.

But somebody needs to go beyond the way things are and how they could be better. Someone must understand how the larger workings might break and how to build the parallel infrastructures and disruptive intermeshing technologies that would allow societies to re-form and self-organise along more practical and self-sustaining and self-reforming avenues of development.

This is a higher level of the “dirty job” concept, but sooner or later it will be needed.

Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst. It is never too late (or early) to have a Dangerous Childhood.

Patchwork Kids: A Kindred Tribe to Dangerous Children

Dangerous Children are best known for their competent multi-faceted independence. They master at least three means of financial independence by the age of 18, and never stop developing new skills.

Patchwork Kids are similarly known for their ability to take on multiple types of jobs and projects, as well as for their ability to find their way through all kinds of changing employment scenarios and career obstacle courses which one finds in rapidly evolving societies.

Many still cling to the notion of a dream job- a perfect opportunity that will afford success, fulfillment, and all that one desires. Whether such positions actually exist or are simply the stuff of myth and fantasy is disputable. But regardless, these ideals are false guides to those seeking professional growth and opportunity.

___ http://marabhuber.com/2014/03/05/a-patchwork-career/

It is best not to be too attached to one particular career path in one’s life. Things are changing much too rapidly for most areas of employment. Occupations arise, reach a peak in demand, then go extinct — much like empires and biological species. It is best for children to learn multiple skills and competencies — including flexibility and resilience.

The underlying concept of patchwork occupational flexibility is far too important to allow it to be commandeered by any particular thinker or author, so take each interpretation of “Patchwork Principles” or “Patchwork Employment” with a grain of salt. The central framework of the Patchwork Kid strategy is to build into the child the ability to pursue multiple career paths, to be the master of one’s own occupational world, and to be prepared to evolve along with the needs and demands of both your own life and the times in which you live.

Lifelong learning is a prerequisite for most everything in life that is worthwhile; work is no exception. Although you will settle into a routine related to recordkeeping and other mundane tasks, you will likely never fully enjoy the “cruise control” mentality that you may now know in your 9-to-5 world. In contrast, as an entrepreneur you will be growing and learning in many directions at once. You alone will need to determine when you need to seek out a book, class, or mentor to guide you when you encounter new topics related to running your business, either to keep up with the industry in which you work or as you strive to honor your lifestyle framework. Are you able to ask for help when the need arises? Can your ego handle it? Are you willing to climb the learning curves that you will inevitably encounter?

… The Patchwork Principle is a freelance career strategy based on the simple idea that working for a number of employers simultaneously presents unique business opportunities and insulates you from sudden and total job loss… The Patchworker carries all of the standard responsibilities of the freelancer but has an agenda beyond earning money: life… A Patchworker is a freelancer who selectively accepts work based on lifestyle factors that they determine to be personally important.

__ https://www.quintcareers.com/patchworker-mindset/

The difference between a well prepared Patchwork Kid, and someone who is forced by circumstances to hold down multiple part-time jobs that they may or may not like, is that the Patchwork Kid consciously and skillfully navigates her way through the rapids and eddies of society’s occupational turbulence — having learned such resilient flexibility from the earliest age.

The patchworker is a new kind of employee working quite differently than the traditional freelancer. First, patchworkers are highly selective about the work they choose to accept because quality of life, dubbed lifestyle design, is paramount. Second and perhaps most notably, patchworking is the art and science of fishing for new, mostly unadvertised leads and pitching them to prospective employers. The competition in these situations is practically non-existent and the odds of landing the work are certainly in favor of the person pitching the solution. Patchworkers offer potential employers an immediate and practical solution to existing problems or present new ideas and an implementation plan.

___ http://www.aol.com/article/2011/04/05/the-patchwork-principle-a-new-employment-strategy-for-the-21st/19902583/

Dangerous Children go A Step or Two Beyond

Patchwork Kids are quite capable of building satisfying lives for themselves and their loved ones. Having learned self-sufficiency and independence from childhood, and having put it into practise from the teen years onward, they will not readily give it up to tyrannical bureaucrats or self-important functionaries. When combined with concealed carry and reasonable training in firearm safety, maintenance, and operation, Patchwork Kids will form an important part of any competent society of the future.

Where Dangerous Children are conspicuously different than many Patchwork Kids, is in the many specifically Dangerous skills and competencies which Dangerous Children master. Trained to confront dangerous situations and their own fears from a very early age, the Dangerous Child tends to “size up” potentially hazardous situations very quickly, and often takes definitive action before even the smartest Patchwork Kid knows that anything is wrong.

Regardless, the many areas of similarity and overlap between the two types of training are enough to bring Dangerous Children and Patchwork Kids to a type of common understanding which allows them to work together on a broad range of projects and enterprises.

Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst. Make provisions for the turbulent times that are inevitable in any realistic future scenario.

Teaching Money to Kids

Money and Kids
Money and Kids

Kids need to learn about money while they are young, so that they can develop good habits of spending, saving, and investing.  Although not as useful as the Dangerous Child curriculum discussed more below, here is an overview of a useful mainstream curriculum for kids from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau of the US government:

Here are 10 highlights per educational level from the CFPB guidelines.

In grade school

In elementary school, kids should be learning about the financial world beyond their own piggy bank. Yes, the basics of saving, spending, investing and borrowing, but also more advanced concepts like compound interest, budgets and insurance against financial risk.

Saving and investing:

1. The difference between saving and investing.

2. The concept of compound interest.

Income:

3. Possible sources of income (not including mom and dad), like salaries, benefits and interest rates.

4. Why more education can lead to more income.

Spending:

5. You can’t buy everything you want. What goes into deciding to buy something?

6. How to count and use money.

7. What is a budget? And what goes into making one?

Borrowing and financial risk:

8. Borrowing allows you to buy things now and pay for them in the future.

9. Credit is when you use someone else’s money for a fee, and interest is the fee you pay to borrow money through credit.

10. Financial risk is an unavoidable part of life, and you can choose to protect yourself by avoiding risks or taking out insurance.

In middle school:

Now for the stock market. In middle school, kids should be learning that there’s a thing called Wall Street, and why it matters to them. Also, false advertising, and taxes.

Saving and investing:

1. How time, interest rates and inflation all affect the value of savings.

2. How to calculate interest, i.e. multiply the principal amount, the interest rate and the time of the loan or investment.

3. Financial assets you might want to invest in include stocks, bonds, mutual funds, real estate and commodities.

Spending:

4. When buying things, look for information beyond advertising claims to make a decision.

5. A good budget should account for expenses, income, savings and taxes.

Borrowing and financial risk:

6. The benefits to using credit to finance long-term purchases last a long time, but the benefits to using credit to make daily purchases are short-lived and don’t add up over time.

7. What is an interest rate on a loan, an annual percentage rate, and why do rates fluctuate based on changes in the market?

8. How to avoid getting charged interest on credit card purchases.

9. What is a credit score, and why does it matter?

10. What is an insurance premium, and why do they vary?

In high school:

Preparing for the huge financial decision of college is paramount in high school, but kids should also be learning the basics needed to navigate life as an adult after college. High schoolers should also be learning about the economy, financial regulatory agencies and policies, and should be taught the value of developing a personal financial plan.

Saving and investing:

1. The possible benefits — and risks — of starting a business of your own.

2. Going to college is an important financial decision. Consider tuition and fees, and the future economic opportunities of a degree.

3. How taxes affect income.

4. Some adult things you’ll soon need to worry about saving for: a car, higher education and retirement.

5. The factors that go into calculating an investment’s end value: investment amount, time, rate of return, and frequency of compounding.

6. What do the government agencies (like the SEC, FDIC and CFPB) do, and why does it matter for your finances?

Borrowing and financial risk:

7. The important factors in financial aid for college: grants vs. loans, amount of loans necessary, loan forgiveness and repayment schedules, and expected future income.

8. How to compare the cost of credit from different financial institutions, how to use credit wisely, and the risks of excessive debt — including declaring bankruptcy.

9. How to protect yourself from identity theft.

10. The different types of insurance, from health to auto to disability, and how things like deductibles and copayments work.
___ http://www.marketwatch.com/story/what-your-child-should-know-about-money-by-grade-school-middle-school-and-high-school-2015-10-22

51 pp PDF providing more detailed information on the CFPB youth financial curriculum

While the above curriculum falls far short of the Dangerous Child curriculum on money handling and entrepreneurship, it is far better than what most children and youth receive on their journey through the dumbed down educational system.

One of the biggest mistakes of the above curriculum is the high school curriculum — which is based upon the flawed assumption that all youth should go to college. For the majority who would do better following a shorter route to financial independence, the assumption of universal college attendance is a huge mistake and disservice to the students who are shortchanged and wastefully diverted away from a more productive future.

Dangerous Children are taught how to start businesses based upon entrepreneurial skills and personal competence. They will master at least 3 pathways to financial independence by their 18th birthdays. This is in addition to the mastering of the financial and legal skills necessary to buy and sell automobiles, homes, and other relatively high value items.

From before the Dangerous Child’s birth, parents focus on assisting the child to developing multiple crucial competencies. As the child develops, skill-building that contributes to personal independence is emphasised.

Emotional independence is likewise stressed, although it is well understood that self-esteem generally arises from personal competence — not from touchy-feely self-love affirmations or indoctrination. The social component of emotional independence is not neglected, but is rather developed to a fine art — in a style fitted to the individual child and youth.

Early training on money: earning, saving, spending, and simple investing, is carried out in the form of games and practise markets. Play-acting is one of the most utilised and useful forms of early childhood instruction along with experiential self-discovery.

As for the dumbed down government school system, we can only hope that most school districts will choose to eliminate a good deal of current dysfunctional indoctrination, and substitute useful training such as basic money skills in its place.

Bonus Information from “Survival Mom” on Self- Employed Kids:

My own daughter was just six when she began her own business, “Jog Your Memory”. Her motto? “I remember so you don’t have to!” I had told her she had a great memory since she was constantly reminding me of things I had forgotten! So, we printed out a few business cards, I gave her a Day-Timer I wasn’t using, and off she went to see if Grandma might need some help remembering her appointments! A couple of years later we created a business plan for a neighborhood garbage can retrieval service! Lesson learned? There are no limits to the ways a person can earn money.

Encourage your children to think of their own natural gifts and interests. Seek out family friends and relatives with skills that could be taught to a young apprentice. If your child is a computer nerd, help them discover a money-making niche in the vast world of technology. If your kid is an artistic dreamer, as mine is, take their creations and help them develop a business plan for earning money. Don’t overlook volunteerism as a way to learn skills and establish important contacts as a route to self-employment. Combining a young person’s natural skills with a marketable skill or product may open up a whole new way for them to earn money other than working for the nearest fast-food joint.

Self-employment breeds self-confidence, independence and important business and people skills. Take any skill, any interest, put your creativity to work and develop an idea for a new business!

__ http://thesurvivalmom.com/unemployed-kids-vs-self-employed-kids/

Teaching Kids About Money at Every Age

Teaching Kids Finance and Entrepreneurship

Teaching Kids Business

Finding mentors

Parents can educate themselves to provide a more individualised curriculum for their own children than most any school can provide — if they take a bit of time to look.

If a youth is financially independent in multiple ways — and is a skilled entrepreneur to boot — he will feel more in control of his life than most young people currently do.

There is much more than this to being a Dangerous Child, of course. But early financial independence is one of the cornerstones of the training.

What’s Wrong with “Higher Education?”

My in-laws were asking me when I was going to start my son’s college fund, over the weekend, as my son had his first birthday party. I said “never.” I also explained that I intended, rather, to ensure that our family avoided debt and maintained assets and savings. They looked at me all puzzled. To them, college was a given. You just did it. That’s the way it was. And, to be fair, it once was that way. __
http://thedeclination.com/forget-higher-education/

Once there was a time when going to college might be considered important — even necessary — for a young person to make his mark in the world. Things have changed.

Instead of providing a useful education and training in broad-ranging thinking skills, universities have become indoctrination centres and rallying places for destructive radicals and quasi-fascists.

The resulting incompetence of mind and body is becoming obvious across the landscape of the college-educated.

Awhile back, I was going to lunch with another developer friend of mine. When we got back to his car after eating, he had a flat tire. So he did what every modern American these days seems to prefer: he called AAA to come deal with the tire for him. I offered to just change it for him, because he had a full-size spare. But he insisted on waiting for the tow truck. He seemed incredulous that I would even offer to change a tire.

After awhile I gave up and just walked back to work. He waited for like two hours for someone to change the tire for him.

It was another one of those moments that struck me as a symptom of the Decline of the West. He had an Ivy-league degree, but couldn’t change a tire.

__ http://thedeclination.com/forget-higher-education/

What students receive at universities today is not an “education.” It is a bilateral academic lobotomy. It is bad enough that “higher education” forces so many young people to go deeply into debt. To also bequeath them with a lifetime of incompetence is beyond forgiving.

My son deserves far better. When he’s old enough, I intend to introduce him to the philosophy of Mike Rowe. This “work smarter, not harder” catchphrase that drove higher education for the last several decades is a fallacy. Work smarter AND harder. And even if you just wanted to be smarter, college campuses are ill-equipped to provide even that much.
__
http://thedeclination.com/forget-higher-education/

The author of the excerpted piece above wants to expose his son to practical tradecraft. He feels there is a future in the work that electricians, welders, plumbers, mechanics, construction workers, heavy equipment operators, and other skilled workers perform — moreso than in traditional modern college programs such as, say, multicultural basket-weaving or fighting economic inequality as a social justice warrior.

He is correct that practical and trade skills are extremely important for job markets today and in the future. In fact, kids (such as Dangerous Children) should be able to support themselves at least three ways by the time they are 18 years old. For boys, at least one of those ways should be in the practical trade skills.

After the young person is thoroughly financially independent, however, it is his choice whether he will go on to finance further training or education. He is responsible for any payment, of course.

Even more important than the practical trades and skills training for those who skip higher ed., is childhood training in basic economics, banking, investing, and entrepreneurship — starting and running businesses.

Janitors and custodians can become millionaire businessmen if they understand both business and the custodial trades. Any useful tradesman can do so. Both basic business and custodial skills can be mastered by the age of 12. If the kid has an adult to use as a front man, he can start a business and acquire a significant nest egg before most kids are graduating from a conventional high school.

The overall mindsets of adults toward children and child-raising / education is abominably limited and short-sighted. Not all children are cut out to be Dangerous Children. But most of them can acquire basic practical skills, and become financially and intellectually independent by age 18. In fact, it is the duty of parents to make sure that they do.

What should be done with the modern abominations commonly referred to as “higher education?”

https://alfinnextlevel.wordpress.com/2015/11/11/universities-burn-them-to-the-ground/

Interlude: Dangerous Ghosts

There is a subset of Dangerous Children who sometimes call themselves the “Gray Ghosts.” Retired, mostly in their 60s and older, they earned their Dangerousness the old-fashioned way — some were paid by the taxpayer to learn to kill, then proceeded to the battlefields or mean streets and proved themselves Dangerous indeed. Others hungrily acquired numerous practical skills in the course of their lives and careers, but also learned to stalk and hunt prey — either with weapons or with cameras.

These Dangerous Ghosts have proven invaluable to the training of Dangerous Children over the years. Not all of them can go into the roughest of field exercises anymore, but their skills and knowledge of tactics and strategies is irreplaceable.

Dangerous Children can only achieve their optimal levels of competence if they are willing to learn from the experiences of others. This can best take place when Dangerous Children are raised and trained in the presence of multiple generations of widely experienced, competent — and Dangerous — persons with many practical skills.

The average age of a farmer in the US — a very Dangerous occupation indeed — is 57. The average age of welders is 56. The average US age of most skilled occupations is over 50. And so on . . .

Younger generations often lack the staying power to master skilled occupations, or are impatient to get jobs where they won’t get dirty, wet, cold, or risk any injury. And then there are the hosts of young who cannot pass random drug tests.

Traditionally male jobs are often dangerous jobs:

  1. 99% of garbage collectors are men.
  2. 100% of deep sea fishermen are men.
  3. 100% of electrical power line installers are men.
  4. 100% of roughnecks (work the oil drill) are men.
  5. 99% of auto repair mechanics are men.*
  6. 99% of roofers are men.*
  7. 100% of heating, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanics are men.
  8. 98% of metal fabricators are men.
  9. 97% of aircraft maintenance and service technicians are men.
  10. 95.5% of firefighters are men
  11. 92% of construction workers are men.
  12. 88% of patrol officers are men.

__Staked in the Heart

More

Of course most combat service members are men — from pilots to crew techs to infantry to logistics to special ops.

These — and many other potentially dangerous, typically male skills — are necessary for a modern society to function smoothly and cleanly. Some of these occupations will be largely replaced by automated machinery. But human beings are far more versatile than any machine can be.

Dangerous Children learn a host of skills — many of them Dangerous, some deadly, and some just highly technical. But if the skills are lost as practitioners retire, die, or fall to degenerative ailments, society loses.

This is why Dangerous Ghosts are valued so highly by Dangerous Communities and training groups of Dangerous Children.

Many retired persons would rather drink cocktails from dusk to midnight, watching tired videos and television shows. Others may go fishing or play golf to kill time and make themselves feel that they are not dead yet.

But for those who wish to make a difference to the future, there is the choice of going Dangerous.