Why Dangerous Children Will Not Grow Obsolete

Dangerous Children are Both Playful and Inquisitive

Asking questions is one of the most important ways that children learn. Ordinary preschool children ask about 100 questions per day. But by the time they reach middle school they have essentially stopped asking questions.

Why Do Ordinary Kids Stop Asking Questions?
Source: Right Question Institute

This is one of the tragedies of modern schooling and child-raising. Something happens when children go to conventional schools, which stamps almost all the inquisitiveness out of them. The suppression of inquisitiveness in children goes a long way toward making sure that they will grow obsolete far too quickly.

The world and workplace of the future will demand that its workers and entrepreneurs be observant, nimble, and able to anticipate important trends and changes that are likely to take place. If children and youth never learned to ask the important questions about things and events happening around them, they will be lost and at the mercy of prevailing powers.

Five Basic Questions

Children can learn any number of ways to approach new phenomena, but to begin with it is best to give them a simple checklist of questions to ask, and make sure they acquire sufficient practise to make it a skillful habit.

Evidence: How do we know what’s true or false? What evidence counts?
Viewpoint: How might this look if we stepped into other shoes, or looked at it from a different direction?
Connection: Is there a pattern? Have we seen something like this before?
Conjecture: What if it were different?
Relevance: Why does this matter? __ From Chapter 1 in “A More Beautiful Question,” by Warren Berger

Student Engagement Over Time
Gallup

The graph above from a Gallup study reveals the steady decline in student engagement over time. This says more about teaching methods in conventional schools than it does about the students themselves.

Along with Inquisitiveness, A Sense of Playfulness is Indispensable

Play is central to the learning processes of very young children. And even as children grow older, play is a key component to learning foundational skills and for developing latent talents.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena discovered that recent engineering hires who were meant to replace older engineers who were retiring, did not know how to solve basic engineering problems with which they were confronted on the job. After investigating the reasons for this disturbing shortcoming of new engineers, they discovered something important about the type of engineers they needed to hire:

The JPL managers went back to look at their … retiring engineers… They found that in their youth, their older, problem-solving employees had taken apart clocks to see how they worked, or made soapbox derby racers, or built hi-fi stereos, or fixed appliances. The younger engineering school graduates who had also done these things, who had played with their hands, were adept at the kind of problem solving that management sought. Those that hadn’t, generally were not. __ From “Play” by Stuart Brown MD with Christopher Vaughan

The same problem with new hires and recent graduates is being seen in workplaces across the US as young people who were never given the experience of creative play and tinkering are hitting the workplace. People who developed the skills of improvising and tinkering in their youth will never forget these playful forms of problem-solving. Those who passed through their youthful years without developing these skills are at a serious practical disadvantage in a world of accelerating change, with newer unconventional problems popping up regularly.

Another example:

[Nate] Jones ran a machine shop that specialized in precision racing and Formula One tires, and he had noticed that many of the new kids coming to work in the shop were … not able to problem solve… After questioning the new kids and older employees, Jones found that those who had worked and played with their hands as they were growing up were able to “see solutions” that those who hadn’t worked with their hands could not. __ Play

We know that children pass through windows of sensitive neurological development as they grow older. If certain “connections” in the brain are not made during these sensitive periods of development, it will be more difficult — if not impossible — for many of these young people to make these important connections when they are older.

Asking the Right Questions Meshes with Skillful Improvisation

Solving problems in the real world is altogether different from scoring points on multiple choice exams in school. Improvisational problem-solving facilitated by asking the right questions makes a worker or an entrepreneur far more valuable and sought after in the real world — especially in a world of accelerating change where novel problems are always appearing.

Children and youth who develop the skills of asking good questions combined with competent and playful improvisation will find themselves in demand. And if these youth and young adults have also learned how to manage their finances, they are likely to eventually fined themselves reasonable well off financially.

Dangerous Children learn to master at least three means of financial independence by the age of 18 years. Besides having multiple skills that are sought after in the marketplace, they have also learned to manage the finances of a household and of multiple small businesses by that same age.

But that is just the beginning of what makes Dangerous Children skilled and nimble in this world or virtually any other human world. It is never too late for a Dangerous Childhood, but the sooner begun, the better.

More information on questions, and play:

Right Question Institute
National Institute for Play

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Versatility and the Dangerous Child

The following is co-posted on the Al Fin Next Level blog:

A Dangerous Child will master at least three means of financial independence by the age of 18 years. And that is just the beginning. Dangerous Children continue to learn and master new skills and competencies their entire lives, in order to be able to ride the shifting currents of creative destruction in the larger world.

Versatility in Thinking is Just as Important

Being able to thrive financially is important for adults of all ages from 18 to 108. Just as important is the ability to adapt to new ideas and ways of thinking, as we gain experience.

If we indoctrinate the young person in an elaborate set of fixed beliefs, we are ensuring his early obsolescence. [It is important to] develop skills, attitudes, habits of mind and the kinds of knowledge and understanding that will be the instruments of continuous change and growth on the part of the young person. __ Chapter 3 in Self-Renewal by John W. Gardner

The Dangerous Child movement grew from the realisation that if humans are ever to move beyond the current levels of thinking and living, that a better — more competent and self-aware — substrate of humanity is needed.

Albert Einstein understood that humans needed to move to different levels of thinking in order to solve many new problems which were cropping up.

The world we have made, as a result of the level of thinking we have done thus far, creates problems we cannot solve at the same level of thinking at which we created them. __ Albert Einstein quoted in Des MacHale, Wisdom (London, 2002)

The above quote is often phrased: “We can not solve our problems with the same level of thinking that created them” (Goodreads) .

It is safe to say that most people rarely contemplate the different levels of thought which they — and others — may use in the course of making plans, solving problems, and working through their days.

It is unfair to expect everyone to be able to change their ways of thinking, at whatever point in their lives they have reached. But children are something else, and Dangerous Children are something else yet again.

While ordinary and extraordinary children will inevitably think somewhat differently from their parents, Dangerous Children are trained specially to be flexible and versatile thinkers and doers.

The versatility of thinking displayed by Dangerous Children goes far beyond their broad base of skills, competence, and resourcefulness in the practical world. Dangerous Children are flexible thinkers, and are trained to review key assumptions in their thinking and planning at regular intervals. This is necessary because much will have been experienced by the child directly and indirectly over time, which may induce him to modify some of his basic assumptions. He must have a sound and effective way of making whatever changes are necessary in his conscious (and sometimes unconscious) foundations of thought and action.

Habits Rule us All

The specialist is more susceptible to falling into the rut of rote responses to stimuli, over time, due to the limited scope of problems he typically faces. Generalists must necessarily be more flexible, since they face a wider range of problems.

But even generalists can be forced into rote patterns of thought and response. That is why periodic reviews of personal and professional axioms, premises, and assumptions are necessary.

Habits are good insofar as they allow us to function productively in a more efficient way — freeing us up for greater achievement and enjoyment. But habits must be questioned from time to time, and changed as necessary.

The Dangerous Child is Usually a Mixture of Specialist and Generalist

In human societies there is no reason whatever why specialists should not retain the capacity to function as generalists. __ John W. Gardner in Self-Renewal

We are born into generalism and must function as generalists as we learn to walk, talk, read, and get along with others. Dangerous Children are immersed much more deeply into versatile generalism in the course of developing their broad base of skills and competencies. But many Dangerous Children will launch themselves from the springboard of early financial independence into more specialised careers and businesses — until they are ready to move on to something more challenging.

Modern human societies are based upon the specialisation of labour, and would not be nearly as prosperous without it. But specialists too often find themselves out on a limb as times change, and the world seems to move forward and leave their now-obsolete specialty behind.

For the health of the individual as well as for society as a whole, versatility is crucial.

How to Think

How to Think
PDF Essay: Solitude and Leadership by William Deresiewicz

Thinking is a set of skills we learned at a very young age, in an automatic and mostly unconscious manner. We cannot remember how we learned to think the way we do, and so we are stuck with a large number of thinking “tics and foibles” that we might be better off without. This is unfortunate for us, and even the most intelligent of us must often struggle to compensate for our sub-optimal set of thinking skills.

If we started at the beginning, we could provide a better path to deep, powerful, and independent thinking for our children — if we only took the time and trouble to discover how. First, we need to learn to think better for ourselves. Then we can do a better job setting the stage for our Dangerous Children, in their adventures in thought and learning.

How Does One Learn How to Think (Better)?

If you do an internet search query: “How to Think,” the search engine response is likely to contain a large number of links to websites telling you how to think in particular ways. “How to think critically,” “How to think creatively,” “How to think logically,” etc. It can be difficult to find information on “how to think” in general. Almost all webpages from such a search are oriented toward adults — whose thinking is already set in concrete by this time.

Even so, some websites provide bits of interesting advice that may help youth and adults to think more effectively, within conventional boundaries. For example:

Thinking is something that happens naturally in each individual, but there are ways to deepen your thinking abilities. It takes time and practice to become a better thinker, but it’s a process you can hone all your life. Being a better thinker and keeping your mind sharp can help your mental and physical health in the long run!
__ More: How to Think

When I applied for my faculty job at the MIT Media Lab, I had to write a teaching statement. One of the things I proposed was to teach a class called “How to Think,” which would focus on how to be creative, thoughtful, and powerful in a world where problems are extremely complex, targets are continuously moving, and our brains often seem like nodes of enormous networks that constantly reconfigure. In the process of thinking about this, I composed 10 rules, which I sometimes share with students. I’ve listed them here, followed by some practical advice on implementation.

__ https://www.technologyreview.com/s/409043/how-to-think/

Every magazine trumpets the latest discoveries about how to be more physically fit.

But enhancing your thinking skills? Enriching your mind management skills? Not many articles about that. __ https://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2014/05/29/thinking-about-how-to-think/

The short articles linked above contain some useful tips for improving one’s thinking skills. But even the most unconventional suggestions are still quite conventional. If we are to help to liberate the minds of future generations of Dangerous Children, we will need to unleash our own minds in some radical ways.

Making Radical Improvements in Thinking is Difficult After a Certain Age

Edward De Bono, who introduced the idea of Lateral Thinking, has devoted his life to helping adults to think in more powerful, profound, and playful ways.
Full book catalog

De Bono has also written a book on teaching children how to think. The slide presentation below provides a quick introduction to the ideas in Teach Your Child How to Think.

We should keep in mind that thinking is a set of interlocking skills and processes, which work behind the scenes in most adults in an almost wholly unconscious manner. These skills were developed from a very early age, beginning in the womb. They were automatically bootstrapped onto the rapidly developing neural substrate of the developing fetus, neonate, and infant. The process of thinking skills acquisition continues in childhood, is knocked off the tracks in puberty, and settles more or less in place by early adulthood.

If you want your Dangerous Child to have the most powerful and independent mind he can have, certain approaches to child nurturing and child raising will work better than others. If a parent or caretaker waits until college age — or even high school age — to provide an environment conducive to developing thinking skills, it will be much too late.

Teaching a Child to Think is Teaching Him to Be

The Dangerous Child Method is based upon the development of creative skills in movement, language, music, art, and pattern. Because the foundations of these skills are built long before the child can walk, talk, and meaningfully converse — even before birth — the approach to guiding Dangerous Child development in skills competency (including thinking skills) must take a primarily nonverbal form.

By developing the latent patterns of space, time, language, music, and motion, the Dangerous Child is prepared for a fuller range of possible skills when his brain moves through the sensitive periods of development in childhood.

For a very young child, there is no difference between thinking and being. It is only later that he learns to deceive, and create a secret inner life. It is crucial to facilitate the development of powerful thinking skills in the formative years, before the child begins to feel the strong tug of popular, nonsense culture.

Children are Born Creative

It is not necessary to teach a child to be creative. Rather, it is necessary to restrain yourself from destroying the child’s innate creativity. Some discipline is always necessary, since the child’s basic needs must be met in spite of the turbulent impulses and inner demands that most children are prey to.

Give the child a wide range of opportunities to experiment and exercise his creativity. Children begin to reveal their aptitudes and inclinations from an early point in their existence. Look for particular strengths which can be utilised for growth, and look for particular weaknesses which will need to be either eliminated or compensated for.

At each state of development, the process of developing new thinking skills will evolve and take different forms — building on older skills and integrating themselves, new into old.

Coaches Must Understand How New Thinking Skills Fit In

Some skills, such as music, art, motion, and language, seem to progress in a logical fashion. The toddler is not so different from the olympic athlete, in basic neuromuscular function. The development from one to the other is a matter of qualitative refinement and quantitative progression over time — and entirely plausible.

The development of a world class mathematician or theoretical physicist from a babbling infant is a little more difficult to conceive, but the basic ingredients are all there. Most infants who have the latent potential to be productive mathematicians or theoretical physicists will never develop into those professions, for many reasons. One of the reasons for such a failure to evolve is that the necessary early forms of pattern experimentation and exploration were never attempted. And so the tools for personal evolution were not provided at the needed time — usually long before parents even have an inkling that any useful skills of such a nature exist.

Children must be nurtured, but allowed to experiment and fail. They must be supported, but also taught to develop natural skills of hard work and independence. They must be valued, but not be led to see themselves as the centre of the universe.

Eventually the child himself will teach himself to bootstrap his own thinking skill sets. The real world will provide plenty of challenges against which to test himself and his unique approach to thinking.

Why today’s college students still can’t think

Image is Everything?

Fantasy Self of Superpowers vs. Genuine Self of Competence and Growth

Image is Everything

Remember when tennis legend Andre Agassi was the poster child for “pretty-boy losers?” No matter how many times he said “Image is Everything,” his perfect image still lost tennis matches. Only after devoting himself to the hard work of becoming a better tennis player was he able to escape the “image trap” and develop the master inside of himself.

Agassi After Being Hit by Reality

Although the popular culture of celebrities is all about the fantasy life, the “image is everything” life, the real world only has room for so many celebrities and artificial role models. For most people, a successful life would be better achieved through facing reality head on.

Genuine Self vs. Fantasy Self

Becoming a Dangerous Child is hard, but playful, work. The art of personal unfolding and self-realisation which all Dangerous Children must undergo leads naturally into a deliberate and self-guided ascent up the mountain to becoming a genuine — as opposed to fantasy — self. Genuine selves are aware that they are fallible, with faults and weaknesses. It is this awareness which allows genuine persons to push themselves to grow.

This is in stark contrast to the “fantasy self”:

Because the main goal [of the fantasy self] is the attainment of glory, he becomes uninterested in the process of learning, of doing, or of gaining step by step — indeed, tends to scorn it. He does not want to climb a mountain; he wants to be on the peak. Hence he loses the sense of what evolution or growth means, even though he may talk about it. Because, finally, the creation of the idealized self is possible only only at the expense of truth about himself, its actualization requires further distortions of the truth, imagination being a willing servant to this end. Thereby, to a greater or lesser extent, he loses in the process his interest in truth, and the sense for what is true and what is not true — a loss that, among others, accounts for his difficulty in distinguishing between genuine feelings, beliefs, strivings and their artificial equivalents (unconscious pretenses) in himself and in others. The emphasis shifts from being to appearing. __ “Human Growth” by Karen Horney

It is easy to recognise the modern perpetual adolescent in Karen Horney’s description above. Today’s university student may spend years exploring college coursework before finding a field of study which does not require too much exertion. Because they had always been told how “special” and “smart” they were, and how they could accomplish anything at all to which they set their minds — and because they had never learned how to work or to discipline themselves — today’s generations of psychological neotenates find themselves at a loss. As they move out of the respective wombs of their childhood homes and the artificial school environments, they become aware that the world that awaits them may not place as high a value on their abilities as they do themselves.

Limit Early Exposure to Supernatural Fantasies

Since very young minds are exquisitely impressionable to all ideas — no matter how unrealistic or absurd — Dangerous Children are not exposed to the concept of superheroes or perfect humans until they have acquired the character and self-discipline they need to teach and guide themselves through the difficult process of self-discovery. They must avoid groupthink and become natural independent contrarians.

In the young years, teaching the child to love working hard to achieve his own goals should take precedence over any religious concepts of “perfection through faith” or other ideas that could easily be taken as magical by very young minds. Children must grow from the stage where everything is done for them to later stages where they are able to do more and more for themselves and eventually for their own families. “Magical solutions to real problems” can become lifelong impediments to a child’s development of personal competence.

For this reason, Dangerous Children spend most of their early years experimenting and discovering their interests and aptitudes, developing grit and character (executive functions), and in establishing footholds for future learning and self-teaching. This is all done in a playful context, allowing for plentiful serendipity, but within a deliberate framework.

Modern Culture is a Cesspool of Mindless Fantasy

And this is why so many college graduates and college dropouts cannot pay their student loans, and are forced to live in their parents’ basements or garage bedrooms. This is why young men who should be working and starting families spend their lives playing video games, watching internet porn, and living in fantasy worlds imagining themselves as superheroes and superstuds.

When the early years are frittered away on television comics and fantasy tales, invaluable time is lost which should have been spent developing basic foundations of competence and character. When children are handed over to institutions run by persons who have no real interest in the child’s development of a genuine self — but prefer instead to mold the child into a groupthinking zombie mind to make things easy on the institution — opportunities for developing personal competence and individual mastery of aptitudes and skills are squandered.

Today’s Youth are Disappointed In Reality, but Helpless to Make Things Better

Because most modern youth have been pampered, sheltered, made to feel special even when they are not, and are never given meaningful foundations for learning, self-teaching, or common sense — they are apt to have trouble finding a place for themselves. Their genuine selves were never developed, so they are left with fantasy selves and overactive imaginations necessarily disconnected from reality.

The modern world is evolving rapidly as a result of disruptive innovations in science and technology. In addition, the foundations of modern societies are being eroded by unwise energy policies (green energy scams), scientific hoaxes perpetrated by political activists (climate apocalypse cult), suicidal debt levels, and a dysgenic undertow that threatens to carry everything away.

Modern youth have never been prepared for such a world of increasingly precarious foundations. They have not even been prepared for a normal world of real-life expectations. But this world? It is an impossible situation for them.

And So the Need for Raising Dangerous, Self-Teaching Children, Who Love Hard Work

The perfect is the enemy of the good. And the perfect — the Platonic ideal — does not exist in the real world. Dangerous Children understand this, and are taught early to learn the shade-tree engineer’s approach of optimising, rather than perfecting.

The real world is where things get done and where there is money to be made — as opposed to government, organised crime, and academia where there is money to be stolen and stripped away from the productive world of work and enterprise.

Dangerous Children Teach Themselves Money Skills and Entrepreneurship and Much More

There are dozens of $billionaire college dropouts and thousands of millionaires who never went to college or dropped out to participate in the real world. They are largely self-taught. Self-Teaching for Ordinary Adults

The Dangerous Child movement is about more than building a strong personal base of operations. It is about building a competent society, one Dangerous Child at a time. Dangerous Children go on to network with other Dangerous Children to form Dangerous Communities, and networked Dangerous Communities. As these networks of competent communities proliferate, they provide a safe redundancy for the larger society in case of disaster or catastrophe. If worse comes to worse, networked Dangerous Communities can provide the nuclei for a more robust, resilient, and anti-fragile society to come.

An abundant and expansive human future of free people is only possible if children grow into their genuine selves, rather than into the fantasy selves which today’s degenerate societies seem to prefer.

In the US Big Government is the Problem; Dangerous Children are the Solution

Crony Corruption and Its Enemies Image Source
Crony Corruption and Its Enemies
Image Source

And now we have Trump. He was elected to drain the swamp. He may be our last hope to tip the Big Club over a cliff. __ Canadian Radical Press

Big Government Stifles Opportunity and Destroys the Future

The fear of big government is near a record high in the US, despite the election of populist presidential candidate Donald Trump.

As businessman Donald Trump prepares to become the nation’s 45th president, Americans continue to express more concern about the threat big government poses to the U.S. than big business or big labor. Two in three Americans (67%) identify big government as the country’s biggest threat. That is below the record high of 72% in 2013 but still on the higher end of the range since the mid-1960s. __ Mish

Big government siphons capital and talent out of the innovative and productive sectors into the stagnant quagmire of corrupt rent-seeking. This can only create long-term decay from massive debt and a decline of demographic quality — which is exactly what the US has been seeing under the Bush-Clinton-Bush-Obama cabal.

After many years of living under an overbearing nanny government system, populations become dependent — with many of their natural competencies atrophying and diminishing to mere vestiges. Eventually, these lifelong adolescents cannot live without the things big government supplies them.

Dangerous Children Can Live Without Big Government

From the earliest age, Dangerous Children are exposed to situations and environments which help them build their natural competencies. Beginning with the most basic and fundamental of skills, then branching into more sophisticated and powerful capacities to act, Dangerous Children learn to make their way in a world of their own devising.

Here are a Few Basic Skills Dangerous Children Must Learn Before the Age of 15 Years:

Some of the skills below involve interacting with other people, and others involve the mastery of the self. These are basic skills which must be mastered before the final three years of formal Dangerous Child training, which prepare youth for financial, intellectual, and emotional independence.

1. How to tell the truth

Be honest about your own mistakes and learn from them.

2. How to receive criticism

Accept criticism from your mentors humbly, even when you may feel there are mitigating circumstances. Grow beyond the defensive stage where you feel you must justify sub-par performance.

3. How to break the ice in unfamiliar situations

When asking “open-ended questions,” make sure not to be patronising or to feign simple-mindedness. Think first. Know when to be direct and when to take a more roundabout approach.

4. How to ask for something you want

If you don’t muster up the courage to request an opportunity, special training, or a spot on an expedition, you have no chance of getting it.

“The more you put yourself in uncomfortable situations, the more likely you’ll decide they’re not that uncomfortable after all.”

5. How to keep your promises

Maybe you told a friend you’d show up to his birthday party, or maybe you agreed to finish an extra assignment for your coach/mentor. Whatever the situation, you should make good on your word.

“Break [your promise] and people lose trust and faith in you, which, over time, is very hard to mend,” Hoffman says.

6. How to communicate effectively

No matter your career field is to be, you can always improve the way you speak and write.

“Think about ways to challenge yourself and tweak how you write an email or behave in a meeting,” the anonymous user suggests.

Here’s an example: “During your next team meeting, resist talking about your idea or opinion right off the bat. Instead, count to five, and if you still feel like you have something relevant to contribute, speak up. On the flip side, if you’re shy, challenge yourself to say what you’re thinking, instead of remaining silent.”

7. How to be resilient

The rest of your life is bound to include setbacks, sadness, and frustration (in addition to joy and excitement!). Carolyn Cho says you should use your early adulthood to figure out how to recover from mishaps:

9. How to live within your means

Youth and young adults must think carefully about all their expenditures:

“Luxuries are a wonderful thing only if you can truly afford them. Don’t be a slave to funding a lifestyle that will not last. Learn to live modestly and save up, and then you will have earned the right to purchase yourself some treats, in moderation.”
10. How to deal with rejection

Life is full of challenges. Not every venture will work out. The only way to avoid rejection is to avoid risk, and that is not an option for Dangerous Children.

11. How to learn without a textbook

Studying shouldn’t be limited to your time in school. It “can be anywhere, anytime, and with anyone,” writes Lenny Kho. “Keep your mind wide open.”

You should always be seeking out new ways to expand your mind. Read books, practice speaking foreign languages, or take music lessons — whatever excites you most.
12. How to accept the possibility of change

Research by psychologist Dan Gilbert suggests that we have a hard time imagining how much we’ll change in the future.

So it makes sense that Choi says, “It’s near impossible to plan where you’ll be a few years from now.”

Choi uses his own trajectory as an example. During college he studied engineering, and he never imagined he’d move to rural Eastern Europe to harvest corn afterward — but he did. While living in Europe, he never thought he’d later move to a fancy building in New York City — but that’s exactly what happened.

Expect to be surprised by the future.

13. How to make a decision

Pretend somone’s holding a gun up to your head and giving you 15 seconds to make a decision. You’ll definitely be able to choose something — and it will release a lot of pressure.
14. How to sell yourself

This skill isn’t just for professional salespeople.

“Being able to sell yourself to others is a vital skill in any area of life,” writes Lukas Schwekendiek. “In the working business you have to sell yourself to clients and potential employers. In finding a partner you must sell yourself to the person and your potential benefit to their life.”

Try telling a story about yourself, since it will be easier for people to remember. And make sure that story sparks conversation among your listeners.
15. How to negotiate

One strategy is getting people to say “no” when you want them to ultimately say “yes.” For example, when you’re negotiating the terms of a job and not getting your way, you can ask the hiring manager, “Do you want me to fail?” The answer is, obviously, no — and from there, you can start pushing for what you need.
16. How to listen without speaking

M. Malhan writes: ‘By training yourself to be a better and ACTIVE LISTENER, you will be able to communicate more effectively and develop better relationships in life.”

As Dave Kerpen, CEO of Likeable Local, previously told Business Insider, listening is the most important — and most underrated skill — in business and in life.

If you want to develop your own active listening skills, try “mindful conversation.” Two people pair up and one person speaks for a set time period while the other is completely silent. Then, the second person reflects on what the first person said until the first person feels satisfied. Finally, the two people switch roles.

The goal of mindful conversation is to have less superficial interactions, to instead have interactions that leave you feeling like you and your conversation partner really understood each other.
17. How to be patient

Take a tip from Steve Kobrin: “Good things simply do not happen overnight. They take time to nurture and cultivate. They take a lot of work. A lot of thought. A lot of trial and error, and learning from your mistakes.”

__ Adapted and paraphrased from Source

Note that the article excerpted and paraphrased above was written for young adults in their 20s. But as we never tire of saying, if you wait until a person is a young adult before teaching them to be generally and broadly competent, you have waited too late. Instead of a competent society, you will harvest a society of perpetual adolescents, psychological neotenates, academic lobotomates, and a general mass of people eternally lost at sea.

And with that kind of population, the best kind of government you can ever hope for is a corrupt and stifling nanny state, that will eventually collapse of its own incompetence — in other words, something like what the US was rapidly becoming under Obama, and would certainly have become under Ms. Hillary P. Clinton.

Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst. It is never too late to have a Dangerous Childhood.

The Stable Core at the Heart of Every Effective Risk-Taker

Risk-Taking is at the Core of Any Effective Life

Life is inherently unpredictable. We must constantly act in the face of imperfect information, which means that we are always at risk of betting wrong — and failing. This is simply the nature of the universe, and the human condition. It is a reality that courageous humans learn to face head-on — but which cowardly rent-seekers attempt to evade by using the coercion of governments, gangs, and mobs.

Normal risk-taking ranges from the financial to the existential, and can be quite stressful unless a child is raised to carry a core of stability within himself. The development of such inner competencies are an essential part of Dangerous Child training.

Emotional Balance and the Sentic Cycles

Source
Emotional Spectrum

Source

Normal human emotions range across a broad and deep spectrum, and are experienced automatically in response to both internal and external events. These emotions can be pleasant, neutral, or unpleasant. In the Dangerous Child Method for training risk-takers, none of these normal emotions are denied or blocked. Instead, they are recognised and incorporated into everyday experience.

One of the most useful methods for utilising the broad range of emotions is called “Sentic Cycles,” developed by Dr. Manfred Clynes — a musician and neuroscientist. The Sentic Cycles are integrated into emotional exercises which persons regularly perform on their own, in order to better integrate and calibrate their emotions into their daily lives. More:

Sentic Cycles lets you generate and express your emotions in a series, as a spectrum, your emotion ‘symphony’, so you tend to become free from emotional rut – being stuck in one emotion
– and be in touch with your real self – not overwhelmed by single emotion (yet able to savour them all as in music).

It takes only 10 minutes to learn to do it – and then you may benefit from doing it anytime the rest of your life – as long as human nature does not change! Anyone can do it.

… We all tend to be prisoners of emotion more than we may wish to be. Emotions make life enjoyable and meaningful, but not if you are in an emotional rut, where a particular, most often negative, emotion takes over, and makes it hard to get out of, even temporarily. Often such negative emotions are suppressed, but still interfere with function and freedom of experience.

Sentic Cycles allow you to experience and express all such emotions more constructively, without being overwhelmed by them. Like music, like an artistic experience, the emotion becomes an example of your own humanity: it allows you to savour that emotion as one that is shared by humanity. At the end of the Sentic Cycle you may feel a sense of belonging, a sense of being glad to be alive.
__ http://senticcycles.org/faqs.html

It takes about 25 minutes to go through the entire cycle, if done according to the standard procedure developed by Dr. Clynes. As described on the website above, the Sentic Cycles are immensely useful for virtually everyone.

What is not always readily apprehended however, is that the cycles can be adapted for specific uses that are customised for each individual. This adaptibility to the individual is immensely useful for Dangerous Child training, since no two children are exactly alike, and no two trainings are precisely the same.

Here is an intriguing comment from Don O’Brien, a former trainer of Sentic Cycles, referring to the use of Sentic Cycles to treat addictions:

What causes any psychological addiction is unimportant. Perform Sentic Cycles at least five times. During the Hate phase hate every aspect about whatever addiction you want to stop. You will soon no longer have the urges, and will actually notice the absence of urges. As you continue to do cycles regularly, your mixed up emotions, often caused by lying to yourself, will sort themselves out very soon, too.

I worked for Manfred Clynes in Sydney in the eighties, and over the decades have taught dozens how to cure their own addiction quickly…without a relapse. While performing sentic cycles, you become your own best therapist, because you cannot lie to yourself comfortably while doing one.

__ https://alfinnextlevel.wordpress.com/2016/11/06/how-to-be-happy-in-an-unhappy-world/comment-page-1/#comment-5152

Here are the eight basic phases of the Sentic Cycles:

 

  1. No emotion
  2. Anger
  3. Hate
  4. Grief
  5. Love
  6. Sexual Desire
  7. Joy
  8. Reverence

Source

Each phase is experienced on its own, in its own particular way. The phases are placed in their specific order for a purpose, which is better understood after one has practised the cycles over a period of weeks or longer.

By calibrating and integrating these human emotions into a Dangerous Child’s everyday experience, he learns how to utilise them in the course of performing essential tasks — including risk-taking activities which might otherwise prove overwhelming for most untrained children.

The Dangerous Child Method integrates a few more emotions than the basic list above — depending upon the child — but maintains the basic order of experience, which has proven extremely useful. As mentioned in Don O’Brien’s comment, each phase can be modified to achieve specific goals within that particular emotion’s domain.

Entrepreneurs are Universal Risk Takers

All Dangerous Children are trained in the entrepreneurial skills. Entrepreneurship is best considered as a behaviour: “judgmental decision making under uncertainty.” (Source Peter Klein Chapt 9)

Since virtually all decision-making is necessarily done under conditions of some uncertainty, virtually the whole of meaningful life involves entrepreneurial risk, with some emotional overtones. And thus the importance of training Dangerous Children in the experience of the wide range of emotions at a very young age — to insert a core of emotional stability within the Child’s heart, well before it would generally be considered necessary by conventional child psychologists or early childhood educators.

 

Special Note:

For children before the onset of puberty, the “sexual desire” emotion is replaced by a “physical excitement” emotion such as what is experienced on a roller coaster, a zip line, an elevated rope swing, etc.  This substitution reflects the malleable nature of the sentic cycles, which allows them to be customised to suit particular needs and goals.

 

A Scientific Digression

Skip forward to around 6:10 in the video above to the start of Adam Gazzaley’s (MD, PhD) talk on his quest to optimise the human mind using advanced tools of cognitive neuroscience.

Gazzaley’s lab at UCSF is working to enhance brain function using sophisticated technologies capable of observing the brain at work, and of helping individuals to achieve more with their brains than they currently can do.

The lab designs video games that are based upon real-time neurofeedback. The player’s brain reacts instantly to events in the game — and the game reacts to what is happening in the brain. Gazzaley describes this videogame neurofeedback learning process as a “closed loop system” (see image below).

Closed Loop System Adam Gazzaley UCSF
Closed Loop System
Adam Gazzaley UCSF

Much of the experimentation with these neurofeedback videogames has focused on combat-oriented training, being funded by the US Pentagon. But a moment’s reflection suggests that this “closed loop neurofeedback videogame” approach to brain training could be readily applied — with appropriate adaptation — to humans at almost any age, for multiple purposes of enhanced development, enhanced performance, rehabilitation after injury or disease, or for mitigation of the effects of ageing and neurodegeneration.

Gazzaley’s published efforts are so far still quite primitive, but the possibilities for the future are impressive on many fronts.

Modern societies have grown stagnant and corrupted by a widespread philosophy of rent-seeking, of minimising risk for the sake of long-term security. This philosophy is the opposite of what we at the Dangerous Child Institutes train and teach. We train contrarian thinkers to develop a broad range of skills and competencies which build self-confidence. This self-confidence fuels innovative thinking and risk taking — which are what drives societies to be great.

We are on record as opposing passive popular entertainments for children such as mainstream television and cinema. The developing mind has enough to do without being stuffed full of the low-quality nonsense that movie and television producers crank out for popular consumption.

We are also not enthusiastic about most popular video games and the modern obsession with electronic social media, which takes away from time that would be better spent developing competence in movement, music, language, pattern, and practical skills of all kinds. Electronic gadgets also tend to alienate children from their immediate environments, which can be a deadly failing in many situations.

But real-time EEG and MRI neurofeedback — particularly when combined with sophisticated virtual reality — is different, and holds the potential for enhancing brain function for general learning and for perfecting specific types of tasks.

The brains of children are naturally attracted to play and games of all kinds. The danger that the child will become lost in some types of game-playing is quite real, in the modern age of abusive commercial and ideological child baiting. But if game-playing is used to drive learning and competence-building, the natural child’s drive to play can be used to motivate him to build parts of his brain that can bootstrap later learning which might have otherwise been very difficult to achieve.

Again, even videogames that are used in training skills and competencies should be used sparingly, so as not to create barriers between the child and the real world around him. The competence and confidence for working within the real world is what Dangerous Child training is meant to build.

Teachers, parents, mentors, and coaches cannot ignore developments in advanced applied cognitive neuroscience. Every child runs up against barriers to some subject area of learning or another. Clever and timely use of closed-loop videogame training can help move a child from one learning plateau to a higher plateau — enabling a new and higher world of competence on the road to mastery.

More on applied videogames

Getting Real About Life in the World

If you are young and not Dangerous, your dreams and passions are almost certainly pathetic shite. If you are not Dangerous, you have probably never been exposed to the full-spectrum world out there. So, here’s a word of advice: Don’t follow your passion. Discover the real world first, then you can start to work out how you might fit in that world.

Mike Rowe is a TV personality who championed the concept of “dirty jobs” — jobs that frighten or repel most people, need to be done, typically pay well, and are very low down on the list of most persons’ “dream jobs.”

Mike Rowe has a foundation, the mikeroweWORKS Foundation, which is dedicated to promoting “skills jobs,” work that doesn’t require a 4 year college diploma — but instead requires real world competence and skills.

* A trillion dollars in student loans.
* Record high unemployment.
* Three million good jobs that no one seems to want.

The mikeroweWORKS Foundation started the Profoundly Disconnected® campaign to challenge the absurd belief that a four-year degree is the only path to success. The Skills Gap is here, and if we don’t close it, it’ll swallow us all. Which is a long way of saying, we could use your help… __ MikeRowWORKS Foundation

Skilled workers are growing closer to retirement age. Farmers, welders, skilled construction workers, skilled maintenance workers, and a host of other pivotal “dirty jobs” requiring competence and expertise are growing older and retiring. They are not being replaced fast enough with good enough young replacements.

… the hardest segment of the workforce for employers to staff with skilled talent hasn’t been registered nurses or engineers or even web developers. It’s been the skilled trades – the welders, electricians, machinists, etc. that are so prevalent in manufacturing and construction.

But if these skilled-trades workers are difficult to find now, as Manpower MAN +2.25%’s survey indicates, just wait a few years. The skills gap is likely to become more acute.

In 2012, 53 percent of skilled-trade workers in the U.S. were 45 years and older, according to EMSI, and 18.6 percent were between the ages of 55 and 64. (We are using the Virginia Manufacturers Association’s definition of skilled trades, which encompasses 21 particular occupations.) __ Joshua Wright

Forbes
Forbes

Too many young people cannot focus on one thing long enough to develop competent expertise, cannot go long enough without using drugs to pass either a scheduled or a random urine test, and cannot be trusted with hazardous machinery, materials, or tools. But if young people were exposed to the real world of responsibilities and consequences early enough to understand what it takes to earn, save, and go independent — their attitudes might well undergo a significant adjustment for the better.

A lot of the “dirty-jobs” people that Rowe highlighted on his TV show were multi-millionaires. The money goes to where needs are filled, and glamour often doesn’t enter into it.

Rowe is an advocate for blue-collar workers and is the CEO of the MikeRoweWorks Foundation, which he started in 2008 to help connect people with skilled jobs. Rowe also uses it to challenge, what he calls, America’s “dysfunctional relationship with work.” __ Source

Mike Rowe has some unconventional ideas which could contribute to the improvement and prosperity of virtually any country’s educational policies. And he offers these ideas freely to every US president — whether Democrat or Republican.

“When the dust settles, and The White House gets a new tenant, I’ll make the same offer to President Trump that I did to President Obama — to assist as best I can in any attempt to reinvigorate the skilled trades, and shine a light on millions of good jobs that no one seems excited about pursuing,” he said. __ Variety

Mike Rowe wants to match people with jobs. But he also wants to improve skills training in the US, starting at the high school age level. Because of this and many of his other ideas, Rowe is light years ahead of most of his contemporaries in television and the entertainment media when it comes to contributing to useful change.

Mike Rowe goes beyond the surface fluff of politics, media, academia, and activism, and gets down and dirty in the real world. He is opening minds one by one. Perhaps if President-Elect Trump decides to give him a louder voice, he can open more minds and empower more people to develop practical skills and find ways of using them profitably. Still, there are a lot of things that Mike Rowe knows which he cannot easily communicate to modern youth and workers, raised as they have been in a milieu of short-attention-span frivolity and superficiality. But he does us all a service by continuing in what he is doing.

Dangerous Children Start Earlier and Go Much Farther

Dangerous Children know more than just blue collar skills, of course, although they cannot achieve their fullest potential without developing a wide range of practical skills and competencies — regardless of what careers, professions, vocations, and working pathways they may choose. And Dangerous Children have the utmost respect for other people who master practical skills, do dirty jobs, run their own businesses, and personally keep communities and societies running through their own competence.

But somebody needs to go beyond the way things are and how they could be better. Someone must understand how the larger workings might break and how to build the parallel infrastructures and disruptive intermeshing technologies that would allow societies to re-form and self-organise along more practical and self-sustaining and self-reforming avenues of development.

This is a higher level of the “dirty job” concept, but sooner or later it will be needed.

Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst. It is never too late (or early) to have a Dangerous Childhood.

Some Non-Lethal Skills Dangerous Children Must Master by the Age of 10

Executive Functions Source
Executive Functions
Source

Executive functions are typically developed before the age of 8, and are the foundation of mental and emotional development, and vitally important to life success.

Many observers of The Dangerous Child phenomenon focus on the lethal skills that Dangerous Children learn in the course of their training. But more important than the lethal (or even financial) skills are the character, emotional, and interactive skills. Here are a few:

  1. Persistence and grit

    The pre-frontal executive functions are more important to life success than IQ. Persistence and grit are foundational traits within the executive functions.

  2. Conscientiousness

    Another executive function, conscientiousness is a matter of honest character and integrity, of staying the course. An expansive and abundant human future can not be built on anything less.

  3. Mastering your thoughts

    This involves self-discipline and impulse control, another executive function. It is a necessary skill for the mastery of self-teaching, something that every Dangerous Child must learn to do early.

  4. Finding answers on your own

    This is a crucial aspect of self-teaching. Most questions are relatively trivial, with readily accessible answers to those who learn where to look.

  5. Asking for help

    Everyone runs into a wall from time to time. Knowing when to swallow one’s pride and ask for assistance can make the difference between stalling out, and moving forward stronger than ever.

  6. Listening

    A well-tuned and well-prepared mind knows how to watch and listen. This is where most ideas and opportunities are found

  7. Knowing when to shut up

    Talking too much blocks important observations and repels thoughtful persons around you.

  8. Knowing when to speak up

    Every Dangerous Child is a unique node of observation and thought. Potentially important ideas and observations need to be brought to the attention of others to whom they may be relevant.

  9. Being present in the now

    There is a time for daydreaming and a time for paying close attention. Dangerous Children will often place themselves in hazardous situations, where extreme vigilance is crucial

  10. Minding your business

    While being open to new ideas and observations, The Dangerous Child also knows how to ignore the extraneous

  11. Say what you mean and mean what you say

    Honest and succinct communication is priceless, particularly in tight situations

  12. Positive self talk

    The Dangerous Child must learn to understand and befriend himself, providing emotional support and recalibration on a regular basis

  13. Learn time budgeting

    The limiting nature of time is a difficult concept for most children. But for Dangerous Children in particular, the mastery of time is crucial to the development of multiple skills, competencies, and talents

  14. Learn the value of sleep, exercise, a playful attitude, love of challenge, and good nutrition

    Childhood learning is best done in an atmosphere of increasingly serious play. This involves an emotional balancing and mental focus that requires regular mental and physical re-charging and a healthful stressing.

These are just a taste of the important skills that pre-tween children must learn in order to prepare themselves for later skills learning. Demonstration of the pre-frontal executive functions are crucially important for later Dangerous Child training. If the child cannot be trusted with his hands, feet, or mouth, he cannot be trusted with a firearm or other lethal weapons or skills.

Source: http://www.impactlab.net/2016/08/12/13-skills-hard-to-learn-skills-that-will-pay-off-forever/

Note that the source article linked above is referring to skills that should be mastered by adults of all ages. While such skills may be helpful to learn in adulthood, if one waits that long to learn them he will have missed many priceless opportunities to learn, grow, and build. Dangerous Children have no need to suffer through a modern dysfunctional schooling and upbringing, only to be forced to unlearn all the indoctrination in adulthood.

Skills to Learn Before a Child Turns 12

The age of 12 is a magical time of life. Balanced on the pivot between childhood and the furious transition to adulthood often referred to as “adolescence,” a 12 year old requires skills that will help carry him through a transition like no other.

http://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/eco-tourism/stories/5-teens-who-have-sailed-around-the-world-solo
Preparation for Circumnavigation

Here are a handful of vital skills that young transitional tweens will need to catapult-assist them along their formative ways:

  1. Know how to clean up after yourself
  2. Know how to grow and catch food, and prepare your own meals
  3. Learn to easily move in and out of your comfort zones
  4. Learn to promote yourself
  5. Achieve mastery in a handful of unique skills that set you apart
  6. Learn to easily network with mentors and like-thinking peers
  7. Master the skills of creativity, from drawing to writing to tinkering to computer coding
  8. Become comfortable inside your own skin — make friends with all of your emotions
  9. Find a peaceful, solid place inside of you
  10. Master skills of traveling by land, air, and sea
  11. Become competent in managing money
  12. Know from experience how to start and run a business
  13. Learn advanced first aid, resuscitation, and rescue
  14. Learn the safe handling, operation, and maintenance of firearms and other weapons
  15. Master the skills of basic combat, evasion, and escape
  16. Know how to set and meet a wide range of personal goals
  17. Learn to get along in at least 3 languages besides your native tongue
  18. Learn to find the answers to anything you need to know on your own
  19. Be able to safely navigate any terrain, from the meanest inner city to the most inhospitable wilderness
  20. Know how to get your ideas across in writing, speaking, and multi-media formats
  21. Be in control of your own education in every sense of the word
  22. Exceed the academic attainments of most modern high school graduates

These are a few things that all 12 year olds should perhaps know and be able to do. But they are only guidelines, and actually apply to an age range between 12 and 14. Dangerous Children learn a much deeper and broader set of skills, of course, but not everyone can be a Dangerous Child.

As we have mentioned many times, a Dangerous Child will have mastered at least three means to financial independence by the age of 18. The list of 12 year old skills above should help most readers better comprehend the trajectory of childhood learning that allows an 18 year old to reach the point of multiple independence.

Imagine a society where each young man and woman is competent to face life on his own terms. That is the world of the Dangerous Child.

Government functionaries live in fear of such a society. But you can live in it, if you choose.

Sources for above list:

https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-skills-every-24-year-old-should-know

http://www.businessinsider.com/skills-to-learn-before-you-turn-24-2016-8/#start-saving-money-11

Notice that the sources above refer to skills that “every 24 year old” should learn. Here at the Al Fin Institutes, we believe that if you wait until age 24 to learn these skills, you are more than half-way to a lifetime of perpetual adolescent incompetence.

Children deserve better than the half-assed approach to child-raising and education that most modern societies have settled for.

Deliberate Practise and the Dangerous Child

To Become a Master, Only the Right Type of Practise Will Do

…think about the future of a world that applies deliberate practice on a regular basis and its impact on education, medicine, health, and relationships. Imagine a world where performance in every area of life gets better and better. __ C

Deliberate Practise, to be Specific

Deliberate practice is when you work on a skill that requires 1 to 3 practice sessions to master. If it takes longer than that, then you are working on something that is too complex.

Once you master this tiny behavior, you can move on to practicing the next small task that will take 1 to 3 sessions to master. Repeat this process for 10,000 hours. That is deliberate practice. __ Kathy Sierra (2012) as quoted by James Clear

There is a lot more to “deliberate practise” than breaking complex tasks into masterable pieces. But any coach, tutor, or instructor must understand how to “break things down” for each individual learner — who will usually put them together himself, once having mastered the pieces in the proper way, in good order. More complex skills are built upon the simpler skills that preceded them.

Deliberate Practise is Smart Practise
Deliberate Practise is Smart Practise

Is Mastery Innate or Acquired?

Some level of talent and ability must be present to give the learner a starting foundation. And the more natural talent, the more quickly the student can progress — at least in particular phases of the training. The mistake that is too often made is attempting to train so quickly that crucial fundamental skills and competencies are left out of the process. This mistake is most often made in training those who appear most talented in the beginning, who then expect everything that comes afterward to be easy.

when scientists began measuring the experts’ supposedly superior powers of speed, memory and intelligence with psychometric tests, no general superiority was found — the demonstrated superiority was domain specific. For example, the superiority of the chess experts’ memory was constrained to regular chess positions and did not generalize to other types of materials (Djakow, Petrowski & Rudik, 1927). Not even IQ could distinguish the best among chessplayers (Doll & Mayr, 1987) nor the most successful and creative among artists and scientists (Taylor, 1975). In a recent review, Ericsson and Lehmann (1996) found that (1) measures of general basic capacities do not predict success in a domain, (2) the superior performance of experts is often very domain specific and transfer outside their narrow area of expertise is surprisingly limited and (3) systematic differences between experts and less proficient individuals nearly always reflect attributes acquired by the experts during their lengthy training. __ K. Anders Ericsson

Of course we would not expect IQ to be the deciding factor in distinguishing among elite chess players, artists or scientists. If one is looking exclusively at elite levels, several other factors come into play that are more likely to distinguish the best of the best other than a score on an IQ test. Ambition, persistence, sustained energy levels and reserves, smart practise, ego strength to break out of consensual groupthink, conscientiousness, emotional stability and control, and many other qualities that augment and reinforce simple cognitive skills when moving from simple mastery to innovative mastery.

More on deliberate practise:

Deliberate practice is different from work, play and simple repetition of a task. It requires effort, it has no monetary reward, and it is not inherently enjoyable.

When you engage in deliberate practice, improving your performance over time is your goal and motivation. __ Source

Whether deliberate practise is inherently enjoyable or not, is likely to depend upon the person and how his deliberate practise is designed and carried out.

The recent advances in our understanding of the complex representations, knowledge and skills that mediate the superior performance of experts derive primarily from studies where experts are instructed to think aloud while completing representative tasks in their domains, such as chess, music, physics, sports and medicine (Chi, Glaser & Farr, 1988; Ericsson & Smith, 1991; Starkes & Allard, 1993). For appropriate challenging problems experts don’t just automatically extract patterns and retrieve their response directly from memory. Instead they select the relevant information and encode it in special representations in working memory that allow planning, evaluation and reasoning about alternative courses of action (Ericsson & Lehmann, 1996). Hence, the difference between experts and less skilled subjects is not merely a matter of the amount and complexity of the accumulated knowledge; it also reflects qualitative differences in the organization of knowledge and its representation (Chi, Glaser & Rees, 1982). Experts’ knowledge is encoded around key domain-related concepts and solution procedures that allow rapid and reliable retrieval whenever stored information is relevant. Less skilled subjects’ knowledge, in contrast, is encoded using everyday concepts that make the retrieval of even their limited relevant knowledge difficult and unreliable. Furthermore, experts have acquired domain-specific memory skills that allow them to rely on long-term memory (Long-Term Working Memory, Ericsson & Kintsch, 1995) to dramatically expand the amount of information that can be kept accessible during planning and during reasoning about alternative courses of action. The superior quality of the experts’ mental representations allow them to adapt rapidly to changing circumstances and anticipate future events in advance. The same acquired representations appear to be essential for experts’ ability to monitor and evaluate their own performance (Ericsson, 1996; Glaser, 1996) so they can keep improving their own performance by designing their own training and assimilating new knowledge.

__ K. Anders Ericsson

Pioneering 1993 PDF paper by Ericsson on Deliberate Practise

Professor Ericsson recently published a book on the topic of deliberate practice, entitled “Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise.”

Book Outline by Chapter:

Introduction

The opening question “Why are some people so amazingly good at what they do?” sets the stage for the whole book. Ever since I was in third grade I’ve read biographies and autobiographies to understand how people achieved great success. I was always more interested in learning about the journey than to know what it was like on the mountaintop. This book explains in detail the journey that expert performers go on to reach the mountaintop.

Chapter One

This chapter explains the value of purposeful practice.in expanding your physical and mental capacity for generating greater achievements in the future. It emphasizes the importance of taking small steps on a regular basis and gathering feedback on what you are doing effectively and ineffectively.

Chapter Two

Here you will learn how to specifically harness your mental adaptability to develop new skills and move beyond the status quo way of doing things. It also explains how your potential is not fixed, but rather is something that can be continually expanded.

Chapter Three

You learn the importance of mental representations, of actually seeing the level of performance that you are aspiring to reach. By visualizing the details of what needs to happen, you are able to see the pieces and patterns that are necessary for a great performance.

Chapter Four

This chapter explains in great detail the steps involved in deliberate practice, which is the absolute best way to improve your performance in any type of activity. I would try to explain my interpretation of deliberate practice here, but I think you would benefit a great deal more by really studying this chapter and learning the insights that Anders Ericsson developed over a lifetime of studying deliberate practice.

Chapter Five

A great explanation of how deliberate practice can be used in actual job situations regardless of the type of work that you do. I’ve found in my executive coaching sessions that guiding people through the steps of deliberate practice and showing how the principles of deliberate practice connect with their work situations helps them to move forward in a more intentional and effective way.

Chapter Six

This chapter shows how deliberate practice can be applied in everyday life situations whether you’re exercising, parenting, or enjoying a hobby. Literally anything you do you can learn to do it better the next time.

Chapter Seven

If you were ever wondering what it takes for a young person to go on to be world-class in any activity, this chapter explains what is involved. And it’s not for the faint of heart. Literally thousands and thousands of hours of deliberate practice over many years are required to become the best of the best at what you do. But if you’re goal is to be world-class, then this chapter explains how to do it.

Chapter Eight

This chapter explodes the myth of natural talent. It shows in detail that great performers always got there through extraordinary practice.

Chapter Nine

In this closing chapter, Ericsson and Pool guide the reader to think about the future of a world that applies deliberate practice on a regular basis and its impact on education, medicine, health, and relationships. Imagine a world where performance in every area of life gets better and better. They close their book with a new concept, Homo exercens rather than Homo sapiens. They wrote, “Perhaps a better to see ourselves would be as Homo exercens, or ‘practicing man,’ the species that takes control of its life through practice and makes of itself what it will.”

__ http://www.thecoughlincompany.com/cc_vol14_12a/

Chapter 9 of Ericsson and Pool’s book suggests that a world that applies deliberate practise regularly, would be a better world in many ways. That is probably true. But in the modern world where virtually every institution of government, education, media, foundations, and other cultural institutions are irredeemably corrupt and self-serving, how can productive disruptive change be implemented on a broad scale?

The answer is, it probably cannot be implemented on a broad scale in any meaningful sense — without dumbing it down to impotence.

Sure, if a billionaire such as Sergey Brin, Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Tom Steyer, Richard Branson, or one of the other “usual suspects” would stop squandering resources on delusional green boondoggles, and begin to invest on the future minds and competencies of new generations, things would likely change. But such billionaires — and virtually all men of power and influence — are corrupted by the taint of groupthink and government rent-seeking. Institutional rot exists not only in large institutions, but also infects all products and forms of output from such institutions.

What is to be done, then? What indeed.

Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst. It is never too late to have a Dangerous Childhood. Best to start the formation of networked Dangerous Communities as soon as practicable.

More:

http://www.braintrainingtools.org/skills/how-to-learn-new-skills/
http://www.braintrainingtools.org/skills/how-to-learn-new-skills/

Deconstructing “Grit”

… grit is hardly distinguishable from conscientiousness, one of the classic Big Five traits in psychology. The study, which included a representative sample of U.K. students, measured grit against conscientiousness. Grit, researchers discovered, accounts for only an additional 0.5% of variation in test scores when compared with conscientiousness. IQ, on the other hand, accounts for nearly 40%, according to Plomin.

Source

Schools in the Anglosphere are spending a lot of money in an attempt to increase the level of “grit” in children. But what is it that needs to be bolstered, and what part does a child’s genes play in “grit?”

Grit is Persistence, Motivation, Conscientiousness, Focus, Impulse Control, and more

Some of the components of grit
Some of the components of grit

The author of a best-selling book on grit, Angela Duckworth, is stepping back from some of the hype that has been propagated in her name.

The consequences of hasty applications of grit in an educational context are not yet clear, but Duckworth can imagine them. To be sure, it’s not that she faults these educators — in many ways, she says, these are the best in the field, the ones who are most excited about trying innovative new ways of helping their students succeed. But by placing too much emphasis on grit, the danger is “that grit becomes a scapegoat — another reason to blame kids for not doing well…

… Grit, as Duckworth has defined it in her research, is a combination of perseverance and passion — it’s just that the former tends to get all the attention, while the latter is overlooked. “I think the misunderstanding — or, at least, one of them — is that it’s only the perseverance part that matters,” Duckworth told Science of Us. “But I think that the passion piece is at least as important. I mean, if you are really, really tenacious and dogged about a goal that’s not meaningful to you, and not interesting to you — then that’s just drudgery. It’s not just determination — it’s having a direction that you care about.” __ Questioning Grit

Duckworth is the recipient of a 2013 MacArthur genius grant. She gives TED Talks, has written a bestseller on grit, and has made a good career from promoting “grit” in all its ambivalence.

But it is time to “deconstruct” grit so that we know what we are talking about, and can apply the relevant concepts to helping children develop their potential as individuals and members of various work, social, and civic groups. We know that executive function and personality play as large a role in success as IQ, and that all are strongly influenced by gene expression.

Previous research has shown that a child’s personality can predict a significant, although modest, proportion of the differences between children’s grades at school. For example, a link between conscientiousness and school achievement can explain around 4% of the differences in children’s grades.

… whether or not a person has more or less grit is substantially influenced by their DNA – and explains around a third of the differences between people’s level of grit. We showed that grit is highly similar to other personality traits, showing substantial genetic influence and no influence of shared environmental factors.

… the big Five personality traits – mainly conscientiousness – explained 6% of the differences between exam results of the 16-year-olds in our study. But after controlling for these personality traits, grit on its own did little to influence academic achievement, explaining only an additional 0.5% in people’s GCSE results. __ Conversation

The above comments and research results help somewhat in untangling grit. We know that IQ is up to 80% heritable and executive function (including conscientiousness) is up to 90% heritable. Twin studies suggest that personality is 40% to 50% heritable in the early years, and more so as a person ages.

Grit is usually seen as a combination of self-discipline and persistence / determination. But as Angela Duckworth herself points out, “passion” when seen correctly is a vital part of “grit.” Humans are not robots. They are driven — and drive themselves — by emotion. On top of passion, a sense of purpose is often overlooked when discussing “grit.” For grit to mean anything at all, a person must be “gritty” about something, some purpose.

So if the purpose is unclear, and the passion is weak and opaque, what good is grit?

Additionally, grit can be counter-productive when it fails to adapt to the nuances of particular situations. Persistence, determination, purpose, and passion are important, but they all must be modified somewhat at times by self-discipline, another pre-frontal executive function that is up to 90% heritable. And self-discipline must be informed by wisdom, which is a combination of cognitive aptitude and the ability to learn from one’s own and others’ experience.

The Dangers of Jumping on Popular Bandwagons

Dangerous Children are taught contrarianism, which helps them to avoid the oft-fatal error of bandwagon riding. For example, the mainstream was carried away by Angela Duckworth’s book, Ted Talks, and other contributions to the grit crusade. But since every concept contains multiple errors and pitfalls, carrying any monolithic theme too far without examining all of its components and ramifications, is certain to lead one to overstep himself into a quagmire.

Dangerous Children take grit for what it is, a useful — although ambivalent — trait that parsimoniously incorporates several important aspects of ultimate success.

Grit: Nature vs. Nurture

As mentioned above, IQ is up to 80% heritable, executive function is up to 90% heritable, personality is roughly 50% heritable early in life, and so on. Passion is part of personality, and persistence and conscientiousness are part of executive function. All of them are shaped by intelligence as influenced by experience.

Purpose is the vision, or the guiding light. Purpose utilises all of the above, but contains something extra — something that comes from the turbulent currents and possibilities within the “real world” as the child’s mind sees it. This is where the “community IQ” and “community executive function” influences the child’s intelligence, character, personality, and sense of purpose — via experience, and via genetic and epigenetic mechanisms.

It is impossible to untangle nature from nurture, and neither should be denied its role in the weaving of the character, personality, and life trajectory of the child.

Dangerous Children Do Not Care for Ideology or Crusades

To the extent that “grit” has become a crusade in education and pop psychology, the idea is ignored here at the Institute. But to the extent that the word can be used as a trigger to release a child’s unique orchestra of purpose-supporting strengths, it is invaluable.

The human mind drifts from state to state, from intention to chaos to intention again. The self-management of most intelligent minds can be very difficult unless the flexibly tough integrity is built in from the earliest age. Genes and gene expression will vary between individuals, but all minds can be reinforced and empowered to some degree of increased self-discipline, purpose, strong character, success-promoting personality, and enhanced aptitude across a wide range of competencies.

Modern education and psychology have missed the boat, largely out of a sense of political correctness and groupthink. But there is no reason why you or your children should ride the same bandwagon over the abyss.

Patchwork Kids: A Kindred Tribe to Dangerous Children

Dangerous Children are best known for their competent multi-faceted independence. They master at least three means of financial independence by the age of 18, and never stop developing new skills.

Patchwork Kids are similarly known for their ability to take on multiple types of jobs and projects, as well as for their ability to find their way through all kinds of changing employment scenarios and career obstacle courses which one finds in rapidly evolving societies.

Many still cling to the notion of a dream job- a perfect opportunity that will afford success, fulfillment, and all that one desires. Whether such positions actually exist or are simply the stuff of myth and fantasy is disputable. But regardless, these ideals are false guides to those seeking professional growth and opportunity.

___ http://marabhuber.com/2014/03/05/a-patchwork-career/

It is best not to be too attached to one particular career path in one’s life. Things are changing much too rapidly for most areas of employment. Occupations arise, reach a peak in demand, then go extinct — much like empires and biological species. It is best for children to learn multiple skills and competencies — including flexibility and resilience.

The underlying concept of patchwork occupational flexibility is far too important to allow it to be commandeered by any particular thinker or author, so take each interpretation of “Patchwork Principles” or “Patchwork Employment” with a grain of salt. The central framework of the Patchwork Kid strategy is to build into the child the ability to pursue multiple career paths, to be the master of one’s own occupational world, and to be prepared to evolve along with the needs and demands of both your own life and the times in which you live.

Lifelong learning is a prerequisite for most everything in life that is worthwhile; work is no exception. Although you will settle into a routine related to recordkeeping and other mundane tasks, you will likely never fully enjoy the “cruise control” mentality that you may now know in your 9-to-5 world. In contrast, as an entrepreneur you will be growing and learning in many directions at once. You alone will need to determine when you need to seek out a book, class, or mentor to guide you when you encounter new topics related to running your business, either to keep up with the industry in which you work or as you strive to honor your lifestyle framework. Are you able to ask for help when the need arises? Can your ego handle it? Are you willing to climb the learning curves that you will inevitably encounter?

… The Patchwork Principle is a freelance career strategy based on the simple idea that working for a number of employers simultaneously presents unique business opportunities and insulates you from sudden and total job loss… The Patchworker carries all of the standard responsibilities of the freelancer but has an agenda beyond earning money: life… A Patchworker is a freelancer who selectively accepts work based on lifestyle factors that they determine to be personally important.

__ https://www.quintcareers.com/patchworker-mindset/

The difference between a well prepared Patchwork Kid, and someone who is forced by circumstances to hold down multiple part-time jobs that they may or may not like, is that the Patchwork Kid consciously and skillfully navigates her way through the rapids and eddies of society’s occupational turbulence — having learned such resilient flexibility from the earliest age.

The patchworker is a new kind of employee working quite differently than the traditional freelancer. First, patchworkers are highly selective about the work they choose to accept because quality of life, dubbed lifestyle design, is paramount. Second and perhaps most notably, patchworking is the art and science of fishing for new, mostly unadvertised leads and pitching them to prospective employers. The competition in these situations is practically non-existent and the odds of landing the work are certainly in favor of the person pitching the solution. Patchworkers offer potential employers an immediate and practical solution to existing problems or present new ideas and an implementation plan.

___ http://www.aol.com/article/2011/04/05/the-patchwork-principle-a-new-employment-strategy-for-the-21st/19902583/

Dangerous Children go A Step or Two Beyond

Patchwork Kids are quite capable of building satisfying lives for themselves and their loved ones. Having learned self-sufficiency and independence from childhood, and having put it into practise from the teen years onward, they will not readily give it up to tyrannical bureaucrats or self-important functionaries. When combined with concealed carry and reasonable training in firearm safety, maintenance, and operation, Patchwork Kids will form an important part of any competent society of the future.

Where Dangerous Children are conspicuously different than many Patchwork Kids, is in the many specifically Dangerous skills and competencies which Dangerous Children master. Trained to confront dangerous situations and their own fears from a very early age, the Dangerous Child tends to “size up” potentially hazardous situations very quickly, and often takes definitive action before even the smartest Patchwork Kid knows that anything is wrong.

Regardless, the many areas of similarity and overlap between the two types of training are enough to bring Dangerous Children and Patchwork Kids to a type of common understanding which allows them to work together on a broad range of projects and enterprises.

Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst. Make provisions for the turbulent times that are inevitable in any realistic future scenario.

Dangerous Children Learn to Fail Gracefully — Early and Often

How Can Dangerous Children Master Financial Skills by Age 18?

Humans learn best by trying — by going out on the limb for something. Early tries are likely to meet with failure, and it is the response to early failures that determine whether the child or youth will learn from failure and go on to more difficult trials — or whether he will choose to “play it safe” and not risk spectacular failures (or successes).

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/communication/30-quotes-failure-that-will-lead-you-success.html
http://www.lifehack.org/articles/communication/30-quotes-failure-that-will-lead-you-success.html

Children and Youth Would do Well to Learn How to Start Businesses Early in Life

To avoid wage slavery and corporate/government dependency, a Dangerous Child learns to deal with problems of finance, customer handling, and cash flow balancing, at early ages. The earlier the better. The type of business, product, or service is not nearly as important as the thought and planning that goes into the startup and operations. And if it fails — as is often the case — the Dangerous Child has plenty of other ideas to work out and try out.

Here is another blogger’s thinking on the subject of avoiding wage slavery:

In the age of automation, what’s scarce are problem-solving skills.

Software and robotics are good with set situations and routines, but not so good at responding to unique situations. If someone wants a high-wage job in a profitable sector, one avenue is to become a better problem-solver.

The best way to become a better problem solver is to start a small enterprise yourself, because the entrepreneur–even the smallest scale entrepreneur selling on Etsy or perfominng some service in the community–must solve a wide range of problems on a daily basis. ___ Charles Hugh Smith

Problem-solving is indeed a scarce and valuable resource in the modern age. Dangerous Children learn to problem-solve by taking calculated risks — by throwing themselves into the fray and dealing with the inevitable issues and challenges that will confront him and try to prevent him from reaching his goal.

That is another reason why very early childhood training must instill the love of solving “puzzles” and overcoming challenges. Such instincts are natural to infants and early toddlers, but can be easily blunted by both neglectful and over-protective parenting — and by government schooling. The love of a difficult challenge and the willingness to see a tough goal through to the end is of great value to the child’s future prospects.

Work and Practical Problem-Solving Experience More Valuable than Credentials

College degrees are a dime a dozen. Getting a four year college degree is often the quickest route to a minimum wage job — and the creation of an impossible dilemma when it comes to paying off student loans.

Not every four year degree is a dead-end of course. Engineering and IT degrees can be immensely valuable in finding a reasonable job if a person is energetic and willing to work hard. But four year degrees in history, psychology, sociology, literature, philosophy, and other liberal arts and social sciences will give a minimal advantage, if any, for even the lowest job on the rung.

Problem-solvers with work and business experience, are different. A proven track record of successful innovation, business creation, and management, opens the door to a wide array of opportunities. The best way to create such a track record is to create your own job, rather than waiting for someone else to give it to you. And the best way to create a successful business is to start early, fail often, and learn hard, valuable lessons from each trial.

The “Everybody Must Go to College” Meme is for Losers

Only between 15% and 20% of young people are suited for a rigorous four year college degree — such as the type that opens the door to mid-level and higher level careers. Among African youth, only around 5% are qualified for such degrees. Clearly they need viable and profitable alternatives — and getting work and business experience at an early age is probably the best bet for most.

Few things are more discouraging to a young adult than to be a recent college dropout with tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars in student loan debt — and no experience at working, solving practical problems, or managing a business.

Failure is a Normal Part of Life

Dangerous Children learn to bounce back from failure, with a hat-full of possibilities to try next. Remember: Dangerous Children master at least three means to financial and personal independence by the age of 18 years. When they try something and fail, they are not going to be desperately broke or deeply in debt. They are likely to build appreciable savings by the age of 14 or 16, and be able to pay for a college education outright — either online or via bricks and mortar campus — by age 18, if that is their wish.

Credentials can, after all, be useful to someone who has experience, savings, and an independent spirit. Such persons will be best equipped to make the most use of the credential.

Persistence Determination Purpose http://illuzone.net/quote-persistence-and-determination/
Persistence Determination Purpose
http://illuzone.net/quote-persistence-and-determination/

The fear of failure is just another variety of fear. Dangerous Children must learn to confront and neutralise their fears as early as possible. It should become habitual to face down fear so as not to become stuck.

http://illuzone.net/quote-understanding-fear/
http://illuzone.net/quote-understanding-fear/

What Would Hit Girl Do?

Useful strategies for reacting to threats should be learned early, and reinforced often. We have discussed John Boyd’s OODA Loop strategy, and how it must become instantly instinctive if it is to be of any use at all. The same is true for a wide range of other strategies of reaction, which must become instinctive and rapid — virtually instant.

A violent rape epidemic is sweeping Europe and much of the Anglosphere — in part because modern, culturally non-violent children, youth, women, and men do not have effective, instinctive strategies for dealing with the growing threat.

Around 1,000 young men arrived in large groups, seemingly with the specific intention of carrying out attacks on women.
Police in Hamburg are now reporting similar incidents on New Year’s Eve in the party area of St Pauli. One politician says this is just the tip of the iceberg.
And there are real concerns about what will happen in February when the drunken street-parties of carnival season kick off. __ BBC

Europe’s women have a big problem, thanks to Merkel, Hollande, the Swedish government, and the other usual suspects. They are being raped, assaulted, and sometimes murdered by primitive and violent newcomers to the continent. They are beginning to experience what women in traditionally non-violent cultures inevitably suffer when forced to share the same space with primitive, hostile, unintelligent young men from violent cultures.

“Hit Girl” is a character from a comic book. But her story can be instructive to young girls who are being cast into the multicultural flames.

The pint-sized comic book heroine Hit Girl is shown in the video below, administering summary justice to thugs, drug-dealers, and their close associates. In the scene below, Hit Girl is still learning to be a wicked badass. She lets her “situational awareness” slip for a moment. For moments such as those, that is why children have parents.

But don’t be under the delusion that “girls who can take care of themselves” only exist in comic books and feature films. Dangerous Children — both boys and girls — begin to learn how to deal with such hostile, unintelligent, violent aggressors from their earliest hours on Earth, and even before.

Thousands of unconscious scans take place inside brain and body, from moment to moment, in the constant balancing act of survival. Dangerous Children learn and acquire additional survival reaction scans from an early age. Learning that begins as largely “conscious,” becomes automatic and unconscious with practise.


“Hanna,” shown in the scene above, is another young girl-child who was raised to survive in the face of significant threat.

We understand, of course, that Hit Girl and Hanna are only characters in books and films. Yet, childhood learning to instinctively avoid, evade, escape, and — if necessary — confront head-on the growing tsunami of violence, is possible. At the Al Fin Institutes for the Dangerous Child, we consider such training mandatory.

A girl’s got to begin sometime:


But it’s better if boys and girls start on the road to Dangerousness at a much earlier age.

It is time to turn the tables on the primitive, violent, hostile invaders — in thousands of ways. Helping children learn to take care of themselves should be one of the earliest and more obvious steps taken.

How to Attend MIT at Age 15

MIT is consistently ranked among the world’s most respected and innovative universities. An MIT degree in math, engineering, or the sciences will open the door to many career opportunities that might be less available otherwise.

The family of Indian immigrant Ahaan Rungta moved to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, when the lad was only 2 years old. When he was just 5 years old, his mother introduced him to Open Courseware — an online body of learning materials from MIT. Rungta was studying physics and chemistry when most children were learning their ABCs — all through homeschooling with only his mother to assist him. When he was 15, he was accepted to MIT, where he is currently studying and trying to determine his future area of focus. __ Source

MIT is friendly to homeschooled students:

One quality that we look for in all of our applicants is evidence of having taken initiative, showing an entrepreneurial spirit, taking full advantage of opportunities. Many of our admitted homeschooled applicants have really shined in this area. These students truly take advantage of their less constrained educational environment to take on exciting projects, go in depth in topics that excite them, create new opportunities for themselves and others, and more.

The vast majority of our admitted homeschool students have taken advantage of advanced classes outside the homeschool setting, such as through a local college or an online school such as EPGY. Transcripts of these courses, in addition to an evaluation of the homeschooling portfolio, are very helpful. Some students will also take advantage of MIT’s OpenCourseWare.

… MIT has alumni volunteers called Educational Counselors throughout the world who conduct interviews on behalf of MIT Admissions. We strongly encourage all of our applicants to take advantage of the interview, if available. __ http://mitadmissions.org/apply/prepare/homeschool

MIT also prefers for homeschooled applicants to participate in extracurricular activities (community orchestras etc) and summer programs (music, science, math, computer science etc).

Not all Dangerous Children are homeschooled exclusively. Some will attend regular schools, then undergo additional training after school and on weekends. Eventually, they will break away and take control of their own education.

Not all Dangerous Children will attend “higher education,” in a bricks and mortar, formal sense of the term. All will be able to support themselves financially three different ways by the age of 18 years, and will have the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree in applied sciences and arts by that age. They will be better trained in many aspects of life which cause a person to appear well-educated, than most graduates of modern universities.

Open Courseware, or OCW, is a large set of online educational materials provided by MIT and several other universities. Another online source for free educational materials is Open Culture. You may also wish to explore the MERLOT website for an even wider array of open source learning materials.

Young children are naturally hungry for words, ideas, and all kinds of “practical” learning. They want to learn to impress adults and they want to learn for the joy of it. It is later, through unwise child-raising and educational methods that the love of learning is beaten, choked, and suffocated out of the child.

Better methods for child-raising and education actually take less of a parent’s time and resources than the standard, destructive methods more commonly adopted — when measured over the span of childhood. One must simply understand how do interact with the child at the right time — from the beginning. Raising a child is one of the many things a wise person must be prepared for, in advance. Very few modern persons take the time and make the effort.

Societies are a reflection of the people who constitute them. Modern societies are in a state of instability and decay. Many “advanced” and high-tech societies may be past the point of no return, for reasons of demographics.

Some societies still have time to make political changes that will allow parents and other more enlightened institutions to place future generations on a sounder basis of development and growth. Overthrowing the great green regime of climate apocalypse and the crony green energy scam would be a great start.

Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst. Study the different ways that you and your loved ones can become more dangerous, in preparation for the interim world to come.

Interlude: Dangerous Ghosts

There is a subset of Dangerous Children who sometimes call themselves the “Gray Ghosts.” Retired, mostly in their 60s and older, they earned their Dangerousness the old-fashioned way — some were paid by the taxpayer to learn to kill, then proceeded to the battlefields or mean streets and proved themselves Dangerous indeed. Others hungrily acquired numerous practical skills in the course of their lives and careers, but also learned to stalk and hunt prey — either with weapons or with cameras.

These Dangerous Ghosts have proven invaluable to the training of Dangerous Children over the years. Not all of them can go into the roughest of field exercises anymore, but their skills and knowledge of tactics and strategies is irreplaceable.

Dangerous Children can only achieve their optimal levels of competence if they are willing to learn from the experiences of others. This can best take place when Dangerous Children are raised and trained in the presence of multiple generations of widely experienced, competent — and Dangerous — persons with many practical skills.

The average age of a farmer in the US — a very Dangerous occupation indeed — is 57. The average age of welders is 56. The average US age of most skilled occupations is over 50. And so on . . .

Younger generations often lack the staying power to master skilled occupations, or are impatient to get jobs where they won’t get dirty, wet, cold, or risk any injury. And then there are the hosts of young who cannot pass random drug tests.

Traditionally male jobs are often dangerous jobs:

  1. 99% of garbage collectors are men.
  2. 100% of deep sea fishermen are men.
  3. 100% of electrical power line installers are men.
  4. 100% of roughnecks (work the oil drill) are men.
  5. 99% of auto repair mechanics are men.*
  6. 99% of roofers are men.*
  7. 100% of heating, air conditioning and refrigeration mechanics are men.
  8. 98% of metal fabricators are men.
  9. 97% of aircraft maintenance and service technicians are men.
  10. 95.5% of firefighters are men
  11. 92% of construction workers are men.
  12. 88% of patrol officers are men.

__Staked in the Heart

More

Of course most combat service members are men — from pilots to crew techs to infantry to logistics to special ops.

These — and many other potentially dangerous, typically male skills — are necessary for a modern society to function smoothly and cleanly. Some of these occupations will be largely replaced by automated machinery. But human beings are far more versatile than any machine can be.

Dangerous Children learn a host of skills — many of them Dangerous, some deadly, and some just highly technical. But if the skills are lost as practitioners retire, die, or fall to degenerative ailments, society loses.

This is why Dangerous Ghosts are valued so highly by Dangerous Communities and training groups of Dangerous Children.

Many retired persons would rather drink cocktails from dusk to midnight, watching tired videos and television shows. Others may go fishing or play golf to kill time and make themselves feel that they are not dead yet.

But for those who wish to make a difference to the future, there is the choice of going Dangerous.

Why are Dangerous Children Taught to Build Their Own Weapons?

Hand Held Plasma Rifle / Railgun https://www.yahoo.com/tech/s/3d-printing-used-first-real-handheld-railgun-fires-134325053.html
Hand Held Plasma Rifle / Railgun
https://www.yahoo.com/tech/s/3d-printing-used-first-real-handheld-railgun-fires-134325053.html

The weapon above is a 3D printed railgun / plasma rifle capable of firing projectiles of graphite, aluminum, copper-coated tungsten, and teflon/plasma rods. You cannot buy such a weapon in stores. But you can build one, if you know how.

Using a combination of 3D printing and widely available components, the man built a functioning handheld railgun that houses six capacitors and delivers more than 3,000 kilojoules of energy per shot. What does it shoot, you might be wondering? So far he has tested the gun using metal rods made of graphite, aluminum and copper-coated tungsten, like the ones pictured below.
__ https://www.yahoo.com/tech/s/3d-printing-used-first-real-handheld-railgun-fires-134325053.html

We know that 3D printed firearms are old hat, with the 3D designs available on the internet.

But firearms were build by hand long before Samuel Colt standardised their production in factories. A good metalwork shop can produce large numbers of high quality custom firearms using traditional machining techniques.

But for firearms, it is the combination of additive and subtractive manufacturing that offers the greatest versatility and utility. Now that 3D printing in metals — and multitudes of other materials — is becoming more common, the best weapons makers and designers will need to learn to work with both types of “gunsmithing.”

Yet, we know that in many situations, plasma rifles and firearms are not the appropriate weapon for either offensive or defensive operations. Knives, compound bows, compressed air weapons, crossbows, simple staffs, spears, javelins, etc. etc. can be made by hand from commonly available materials by children who are quite young.

If you look within the JD Garcia curriculum for ages 3-6, you can find the early rudimentary training for simple weapons making:

Physical Biological
Avg.
Level
Avg.
Age
Physical Theory Physical Practice Biological Theory Biological Practice
1.00 3.00 Cause and effect The lever The human body Body care
1.25 3.25 Clubs and poles Modifying trees and
branches
Animal bodies; small
domestic animals
How to care for a pet
1.50 3.50 Different stones and their
properties
Using stones Edible plants and their
properties
Gathering edible plants
and mushrooms
1.75 3.75 Shaping stone Building simple stone tools Edible animals and fish Hunting and fishing
2.00 4.00 Shaping wood with stone Using stone tools to
modifu poles and clubs
Food preparation and
preservation
Cleaning and preparing
small game and fish using
bone, wood, and stone
2.25 4.25 Handling fire Use of stone and wood to
control fire, use of fire to
harden spear points
Advanced food preparation Cooking vegetables, fish,
and meat on open fires
2.50 4.50 Advanced fire handling
and control combining
wood and stone tools,
theory and design
Hafted axes and choppers
are made; stone fire
carriers, simple weaving
and knotting of vines and
leather
Elementary tanning and
use of bone, vines, and
vegetable fiber
Skinning animals and fish,
preserving leather,
advanced cooking.
preparing vines and
vegetable fiber
2.75 4.75 The bow and fire-making Making bows and starting
fires
Advanced food
preparation; advanced
tanning and bone work
Advanced cooking; clothes
from animal hides; use of
sinew and thongs; hunting
with dogs
3.00 5.00 The use of clay and the
bow and arrow; design of
simple rafts
Making and baking clay
pots on an open fire;
making and using simple
bows and arrows
Advanced food preparation
including drying, smoking,
& curing; health care
Cooking, drying, and
smoking with clay pots;
preparing and using
medicinal herbs and
poultices
3.25 5.25 Advanced paleolithic stone
work of knives and axes;
advanced bow making;
advanced clay work
without wheel; large rafts
Making stone tools to
make other stone tools;
making advanced bows
and arrows; bellows and
advanced pottery; building
a large raft as a group
project
Gathering seeds and
planting edible plants;
basic first aid
Gardening; preparing soil
and cultivation; practice of
first aid
3.50 5.50 Neolithic tools;
construction of shelters;
advanced counting; how to
make a small dugout canoe
and paddle
Construction of simple
neolithic tools; the use of
tally marks and stored
pebbles; building a small
dugout canoe and paddle
The biological need for
shelter; building of lean-tos and simple teepees;
clothes for extreme cold;
simple agriculture
Construction of lean-tos
and teepees; more
advanced gardening;
making bone needles and a
parka
3.75 5.75 How to construct advanced
neolithic tools and work
stone and wood; more
advanced counting and
Arabic numbers to 10; how
to build a large dugout
canoe
Building advanced
neolithic tools; working
wood, simple carpentry,
building semi-permanent
structures; advanced
tallying systems; building a
large dugout canoe
How to make boots and
moccasins from leather and
plant fiber; how to know
when to plant and when to
harvest; taking care of
goats and sheep
Construction of complete
wardrobes of leather, plant,
and animal fiber; more
advanced gardening and
animal husbandry

Tool-making and weapons-making go hand in hand. This is natural, since virtually any tool can be used on the spare of the moment as an improvised weapon. Dangerous Children learn early, how to make weapons and how to improvise weapons from everyday objects.

They are not taught to build firearms, plasma rifles, railguns, explosives, etc. until they are deemed emotionally and developmentally mature enough to know how and when to use such weapons wisely and safely.

Not all Dangerous Children will learn to build weapons such as missile launchers and remotely controlled armed drones. As mentioned in an earlier posting, Dangerous Children tend to specialise, based upon their innate aptitudes, inclinations, and levels of emotional development and displayed wisdom.

For most Dangerous Children, their words and non-violent actions will have the most potent effect upon the world that they will require. That is as it should be. Only when pressed beyond reasonable alternatives will most Dangerous Children display a covert prowess in controlled violence and mayhem.

But in the end, we are all evolved from killers, else we would not be here at all. Violence — including lethal violence — will play a role in the coming expansion of an abundant human future.

Pacifists are not truly pacifists, if they are still alive. They have simply not thought the matter through yet — or have not yet been confronted by the harsh realities that await.

Terrorists vs. The Dangerous Child: On the Amsterdam-Paris Train

There was no time to plan, they said, no time even to think.

“We just kind of acted. There wasn’t much thinking going on,” Skarlatos said. “At least on my end.” __ https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/as-french-train-suspect-is-interrogated-questions-mount-on-europes-security/2015/08/23/088ff2fe-4923-11e5-9f53-d1e3ddfd0cda_story.html

Muslim Terrorist on Train http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-34055713
Muslim Terrorist on Train
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-34055713

When confronted by a face to face attack, Dangerous Children tend to confront the attack skillfully and strategically. We see a hint of this ethic in the recent Muslim terror attack on the Amsterdam – Paris train. Here is how the attack played out:

A French banker, identified as Damien A., saw [the terrorist] in a lavatory with his weapon. He grabbed at Khazzani. Khazzani ran into the rail car where passenger Mark Moogalian (an American living in France) accosted him.

Now Khazzani is targeting unarmed civilians. Blown ambush? Shouting? No problem. He has firepower. He shot Moogalian.

But other passengers had more surprises. Instead of cowering, they responded heroically. First one, U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Spencer Stone, got to Khazzani, and then a second, and then four were on him. He could not aim the weapon. In the hand-to-hand struggle, he pulled a pair of box cutters and wounded Stone. He drew a pistol. But Stone’s friends, Oregon Army National Guard Specialist Alek Skarlatos and California college student Anthony Sadler, kept battering him. British businessman Chris Norman joined the fight. They disarmed and pinned Khazzani. To emphasize his disapproval, Skarlatos used the AK’s muzzle to make repetitive metal impressions on Khazzani’s head. Did the message get through? Khazzani was a finger twitch from eternity.

The en masse quick physical assault on Khazzani was somewhat like a tactic the military calls an instantaneous counterattack on a close-in ambush. In the ambush’s kill zone, the defenders have little chance, and so they instantly turn and assault the ambushers. Penetrating the ambush positions brings the battle to the ambushers. In the resulting melee, the ambushers lose the advantage of surprise.
___ http://www.strategypage.com/on_point/20150825221115.aspx

Instead of cowering behind their seats in the face of attack, unarmed passengers began trying to subdue the heavily armed terrorist. Khazzani escaped the French banker, shot the American living in France, but was then rapidly confronted with three young Americans, and one middle-aged Englishman — all unarmed. The last four men to confront Khazzani beat him to unconsciousness, then helped tie him up to await the French authorities.

The terrorist carried an AK-47 assault rifle, with 370 rounds of ammunition. He also had a 9mm automatic, razor-sharp box cutters, and a bottle of petrol — presumably in order to burn the infidel passengers alive. If not for the rapid response by passengers, what might have happened? And what if some of the pertinent passengers had been in a different car?

“We decided to get up because the WiFi wasn’t so good on that car,” said Sadler, 23, a college student. “We were like, ‘We have a ticket to first class. We might as well go sit in first class.’ ”

About half an hour after the train pulled away from Amsterdam, they switched to the car where the shooter soon opened fire, he said.

Along with two other men, they tackled, then disarmed, a suspected Islamist militant who packed two guns, a knife and nine clips of ammunition into his rucksack.

“He seemed like he was ready to fight to the end. So were we,” said Airman 1st Class Spencer Stone, his left arm in a sling, his right eye bloodshot and watering.

The three men — friends since middle school in California — appeared together in public on Sunday for the first time since they overpowered and then tied up the shooter. Stone’s hand was heavily bandaged after an operation to reattach his thumb, which was nearly severed during the attack. All three looked exhausted and sported days-old beards.

But they displayed some of the instinctive camaraderie that on the train led them to leap from their seats in seconds to take on the shooter as a team. They finished one another’s sentences and silently communicated with each other with cocked eyebrows and tiny facial expressions.

Stone, giving his account for the first time on Sunday, said that he had simply had one idea in his mind as he sprinted to disarm the assailant: “Survival.”

He was in “the middle of a deep sleep” when he heard the initial scuffle between the shooter and the French citizen who was the first to stumble on him, he said. But then his friend, Oregon Army National Guard Spec. Alek Skarlatos, 22 and recently returned from a deployment in Afghanistan, “just hit me on the shoulder and said ‘Go,’ ” Stone said.

There was no time to plan, they said, no time even to think.

“We just kind of acted. There wasn’t much thinking going on,” Skarlatos said. “At least on my end.”

Stone said that after the suspect was tied up, he saw that another passenger had been severely wounded by a bullet during the attack and was “squirting blood” from his neck. Stone said he barely felt any of his own injuries, so he focused on saving the other victim’s life. He stuck two of his fingers into the passenger’s wound to hold an artery closed until paramedics showed up.
___ https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/as-french-train-suspect-is-interrogated-questions-mount-on-europes-security/2015/08/23/088ff2fe-4923-11e5-9f53-d1e3ddfd0cda_story.html

A well-known French actor on the train — who was injured when he sounded the alarm and engaged the emergency brake — said that without the prompt action by the passengers, all of them would have been killed.

Three Passengers Who Reacted http://www.people.com/article/paris-train-attack-american-heroes-friendship
Three Passengers Who Reacted
http://www.people.com/article/paris-train-attack-american-heroes-friendship

Spencer Stone, the bareheaded young man in a sling above, is a serviceman in the US Air Force, trained as a medic. Besides being the first to effectively begin subduing the terrorist, he also saved the life of the man who was shot in the neck by the terrorist — by staunching the arterial bleeding and holding pressure on the artery until French EMTs arrived. All of that while he himself was suffering an almost severed thumb, courtesy of the terrorist’s boxcutter.

These 6 men (the French banker, the American living in France, the three young Americans pictured above, and the middle-aged Englishman) were not Dangerous Children. But they all reacted quickly to slow the terrorist down, and to eventually render him subdued and unconscious.

How would the attack have gone down had all of the 6 reacting passengers been Dangerous Children? The terrorist would have been killed by the first to react — if the French banker had also been a Dangerous Child.

In situations such as that, there is no time to think in a conscious and rational manner. Either you have the instinct to react, or you do not. If you have the instinct to react — and also have the training to quickly kill someone who is attacking your loved ones or other innocents — you will simply kill them, without thinking.

Most western children have been sheltered from every conceivable and inconceivable danger their entire lives. They are unable to recognise a deadly hazard, and would in fact remain in denial for the few fatal seconds in which they might have reacted effectively.

Those with military training will show better instincts, especially if they have been in recent combat. But those who develop the instincts of rapid and effective reaction against threats while in their childhood and youth will have an advantage, in the quick reaction stage.

It is easy to focus on the aspects of multiple skills and broad competencies when discussing Dangerous Children. The ability to operate planes, boats, heavy machinery, hazardous power tools, weapons, and all types of dangerous devices . . . The ability to make one’s way financially at age 18 at least 3 different ways . . . But it is the mental training of the Dangerous Child, his ability make and execute complex plans, the skill and speed with which he reacts to threats, the resourcefulness with which he can quickly move to meet dire challenge in times of adversity, that is at the heart of the Dangerous Child training method.

You cannot lay the foundations for The Next Level if you do not survive the low-life terrorists and thugs who infest the modern world, at levels high and low.

A Society of Chumps vs. a Society of Dangerous Children

These days, a chump is anyone who believes what government, media, and “experts” in academia tell him — without checking the facts for himself. A Dangerous Child always checks the facts, and understands how to interpret them in a valid manner.

Consider US unemployment numbers, as provided by US government officials:

Image: The Federalist

A shrinking labor force… can completely mask a serious job shortage by excluding those who stop looking for work altogether from the calculation of unemployed persons. _The Federalist

Currently a record 91.8 million Americans are no longer looking for work. That’s almost one and a half times the entire population of France. _America is Going Galt

In other words, the US employment (and economic) picture is so abysmal, that almost a hundred million working-age Americans have given up looking for conventional forms of employment.

Sure you can make unemployment look better by not counting people, you can claim the economy is growing by ignoring inflation, you can argue that inflation is low because you don’t count food or energy, but the reality is that all of these arguments are grade “A” BS.

We are now five years into the “recovery.” The single and I mean SINGLE accomplishment from spending over $3 trillion has been the stock market going higher. This is a complete and total failure. Based on the business cycle alone, the economy should be roaring.

… The media is lying about the economy. They have been for years. Even the BLS now admits that its methodologies are either inefficient (read: DON’T work) or outright wrong.

And yet alleged “adults” continue to believe this stuff. I don’t get it. Is it mass delusion or are people really willing to believe a lie rather than what their own eyes tell them?_Zerohedge

America is undergoing a massive, engineered social transformation. Not only are all American population groups being dumbed down by government schools and media, but in addition, the least intelligent populations are given preferential treatment for hiring, contracts, school admissions, and whatever other goodies their redistributionist government is doling out. Here is one way the process is taking place in academia. But the same process is in full swing in Human Resources offices across the land — including fire departments, police departments, and all federal agencies.

I will leave it to your imagination as to what happens to a society that promotes its least qualified at the expense of better qualified individuals.

This phenomenon of designed societal decline is not new. Destructive nepotism and corruption is as old as humanity. Most intelligent persons in possession of historical perspective are probably wondering why it took the US so long to regress back toward the mean.

Throughout history, poverty is the normal condition of man. Advances which permit this norm to be exceeded — here and there, now and then — are the work of an extremely small minority, frequently despised, often condemned, and almost always opposed by all right-thinking people. Whenever this tiny minority is kept from creating, or (as sometimes happens) is driven out of a society, the people then slip back into abject poverty.

This is known as “bad luck.” _Robert Heinlein quoted by Instapundit … More Robert Heinlein quotes from the notebooks of Lazarus Long

Anyone who has read Ayn Rand’s “Atlas Shrugged” is already familiar with the phenomenon of top-down decline, which Obama has merely shifted into a higher gear. But society is largely full of people who have accepted groupthink as the proper cognitive style, so they will never stop to think or doubt what they are being told.

Groupthink is very prevalent in low-IQ populations. Drug use, criminal violence, low achievement, and STD prevalence is likewise quite high in such populations. And yet these are the very populations to whom US government gives special privileges for hiring, contracts, school admissions, and much more — at the expense of statistically better qualified and more competent populations.

It should be obvious to more intelligent and competent individuals, that their future well-being will not be assured in government, media, academia, or any other large collective or corporate enterprise over which government exerts appreciable influence or control. In essence, the government has become their enemy in everything but name.

Some parts of the US, such as Wisconsin, have experienced a limited success in turning back some of the dysfunctional policies which the US federal government is attempting to press on all state and local governments. Working from within the political process to reverse some of the more destructive government policies will be successful in some regions and locales — and unsuccessful in many others.

What should intelligent people do — who live in perennially dysfunctional societies with no hope for beneficial policy changes in the near term — to try to assure opportunities for their children’s future opportunity and prosperity, besides moving to a place that offers more opportunity for self-determination?

First of all, understand that “Your Children are not Your Children.” They are themselves, and you are obligated to help them develop into the best selves — the most skilled, competent, clear-headed, independent, dangerous, resilient, and wise — that they can be. That is your duty, and it is not optional. If you think that day care, pop culture, peer pressure, and government schools can do your job for you, think again.

Most of you live in societies that are filling up with indoctrinated chumps. Perhaps it is not their fault that they are chumps, but all the same, their gullible chumpiness is making life harder for you and yours.

A Need for New Meme-Paradigms

Humans think in terms of narratives (stories) guided by meme-paradigms. If you have a talent for art, music, innovation, and narrative — and understand how the mind works, you may be able to help create positive alternative memes, paradigms, and meme-paradigm vectors, to help replace the destructive meme-paradigms that belabor our societies.

One example of a destructive meme-paradigm vector is gangsta rape-rap, cop killa, violent hip hop that holds a large part of black populations in thrall. As a vector, rhythmic hip hop is a powerful learning tool which could as easily be used to teach Shakespeare for grammar school students, or human anatomy for nursing students. Instead it is a river of decay and violence for a growing permanent underclass.

Dangerous Children are beneficiaries of ample early childhood exposure and training in music, art, movement, creative thinking and language, and narrative drama — otherwise known as multimedia creative storytelling and constructive acting out. They learn to mentally dance from paradigm to paradigm before they know what it is they are doing, which makes them infinitely tougher against indoctrination.

Practical skills, entrepreneurship, invention, etc. are added later, after the child has learned to draw his “self portrait,” dance his own dance, and write his own story and song. By learning who they are on many levels, Dangerous Children learn to direct their own life trajectories to match their inner inclinations and aptitudes.

Due to increasingly dysfunctional policies, most modern societies — previously known as the drivers of this affluent high technological era — are now sinking into a corrupt and nepotistic decay. For many such societies, only portions of their homelands will be salvageable for those who believe in individual self-determination.

The above posting is re-published from a 2014 article first published on Al Fin the Next Level

The Dangerous Child: Making Government Superfluous

Most of us enjoy living in prosperous and harmonious societies. We want to believe that we can sleep soundly in our homes without fear of being invaded and brutalised — and that our automobiles will still be where we left them last night, ready to take us to our pleasure and our business.

Gods of Creation and Fertility
Gods of Creation and Fertility

In ancient times, the gods were credited for harmony and prosperity — or blamed for poverty and unrest. Later on, the people blamed or credited kings, rather than gods. Modern people tend to credit or blame their governments for the good or bad times, respectively.

At the Al Fin Institute for the Dangerous Child, we look to the human substrate of society to explain each society’s success or failure. While huge and corrupt governments such as we see in the US, Russia, China, India, and the EU can restrict opportunities and make excessive demands on their peoples, it is the people themselves who are responsible for allowing such governments to come about and continue to exert control.

Most people in such societies live as if they are unaware of the pivotal role they play in the existence and nature of their governments. It is in the interest of governments, established media, academia, and popular culture to keep the people in a state of ignorance and quasi-helplessness.

“What can I do, I’m just one person?”

The answers to this question are many, varied, and lie deeply beneath multiple layers of concealment. Taking the time required to sort through these obscuring layers would be worthwhile for bright and curious individuals who want to learn to play their own game, rather than the game of the schemers who often operate at higher logical levels of influence. Dangerous Children are brought up to play the games within games that help to reveal reality’s interleaved logics.

What Allows Complex Societies to Work at All?

System: a coordinated body of methods or a scheme or plan of procedure; organizational scheme: __ reference.com

The key words in the definition of “system” above, are “coordinated,” “plan,” and “organizational scheme.” Most modern people believe that for complex societal systems to work, they must be guided by a strong, organised government — much as a locomotive is guided by its strong and fixed rails. The larger and more complex the society — it is believed — the larger and more powerful the government that is needed to keep society “on track.”

But this is all contingent upon the nature of the people who make up the society, isn’t it? Intelligent, organised, hard-working, orderly, thoughtful, and broad-visioned people are less likely to need either “the guiding hand” or “the helping hand” of government — making significant portions of modern governments somewhat superfluous. Law enforcement and welfare bureaus, for example, are of much less importance in societies of competent, responsible people. Departments of Education, likewise, are quite superfluous when families educate their own into a broad-based competence of multiple skills mastery.

Governments do not need to perform every single role in a society whose people are bright, creative, ambitious, honest, law-abiding, and having strong executive functions.

Governments stagnate, while private enterprises in competition tend to innovate. (One view of this dichotomy of state vs. private enterprise)

The brighter the citizens, the more self-starting, the better their impulse control and attentional control, the more focused on plans and goals — and the more competent — the less governmental oversight and control that is needed.

If a society finds itself with a relatively homogeneous group of peaceable, intelligent citizens with strong executive functions, it is in the interest of such a society to maximise the value of its citizens, and to limit the influx of less intelligent people with poor executive function and stronger tendencies to violence. And yet we see in Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands, the UK, and other formerly promising nations exactly the opposite trends.

Larger, more mixed nations such as one finds in the extended Anglosphere, India, France, Spain, Brasil, and elsewhere, are beyond the point of controlling demographic decline, and must take stronger — but more subtle — steps to achieve a better result in the long term.

The US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and several nations of Europe and Latin America find themselves in this predicament: declining demographic quality, but lacking governmental or societal will to reverse the decline.

It is for such cases that The Dangerous Child Institute developed its extended nations programs. If a dysfunctional alliance between government – media – academia – culture – and societal institutions in general militate against an abundant and expansive human future, then it is up to those who are capable of envisioning such a future to plan around the many obstacles.

Doomers, survivalists, preppers, etc. tend to restrict their vision to short and intermediate-term survival. That is not good enough. Wisdom requires thinking and planning at all time scales, for a broad range of contingencies — far beyond what doomers can envision.

The Dangerous Child will naturally form communities of Dangerous Children. Communities of Dangerous Children will naturally network, trade, and share ideas and technologies with other communities of Dangerous Children.

Such networks — and networks of such networks — will eventually constitute shadow economies and shadow infrastructures, ready to assist in disasters and to pick up the pieces after significant catastrophes.

Shadow governments — which will eventually make conventionally corrupt and wasteful governments superfluous — will take a dynamic and fractal form which might be impossible for most conventional thinkers to imagine, without a lot of help.

But here at the Institutes, we are not planning to give up. Our purpose is not to convince, persuade, or convert. It is rather to inform and provoke thought. Anything else is up to you. Unless, of course, you intend make Dangerous Children of your progeny. In such a case, more in depth exchanges of ideas may become necessary.

For now, think about it.

Normal Childhood Development and The Dangerous Child

Early Childhood Developmental Milestones https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_development_stages
Early Childhood Developmental Milestones
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_development_stages

According to Wikipedia, this is what a 3 year old should be doing:

Three-year-old

[15][16] Physical

  • Growth is steady though slower than in first two years.
  • Adult height can be predicted from measurements of height at three years of age; males are approximately 53% of their adult height and females, 57%.
  • Legs grow faster than arms,
  • Circumference of head and chest is equal; head size is in better proportion to the body.
  • Baby fat” disappears as neck appears.
  • Posture is more erect; abdomen no longer protrudes.
  • Slightly knock-kneed.
  • can jump from low step
  • can stand up and walk around on tiptoes
  • “baby” teeth stage over.
  • Needs to consume approximately 6,300 kJ (1,500 calories) daily.

Motor development

  • Walks up and down stairs unassisted, using alternating feet; may jump from bottom step, landing on both feet.
  • Can momentarily balance on one foot.
  • Can kick big ball-shaped objects.
  • Needs minimal assistance eating.
  • Jumps on the spot.
  • Pedals a small tricycle.
  • Throws a ball overhand; aim and distance are limited.
  • Catches a large bounced ball with both arms extended.
  • Enjoys swinging on a swing.
  • Shows improved control of crayons or markers; uses vertical, horizontal and circular strokes.
  • Holds crayon or marker between first two fingers and thumb (tripod grasp), not in a fist as earlier.
  • Can turn pages of a book one at a time
  • Enjoys building with blocks.
  • Builds a tower of eight or more blocks.
  • Enjoys playing with clay; pounds, rolls, and squeezes it.
  • May begin to show hand dominance.
  • Carries a container of liquid, such as a cup of milk or bowl of water, without much spilling; pours liquid from pitcher into another container.
  • Manipulates large buttons and zippers on clothing.
  • Washes and dries hands; brushes own teeth, but not thoroughly.
  • Usually achieves complete bladder control during this time.

Cognitive development

  • Listens attentively to age-appropriate stories.
  • Makes relevant comments during stories, especially those that relate to home and family events.
  • Likes to look at books and may pretend to “read” to others or explain pictures.
  • Enjoys stories with riddles, guessing, and “suspense.”
  • Speech is understandable most of the time.
  • Produces expanded noun phrases: “big, brown dog.”
  • Produces verbs with “ing” endings; uses “-s” to indicate more than one; often puts “-s” on already pluralized forms: geeses, mices.
  • Indicates negatives by inserting “no” or “not” before a simple noun or verb phrase: “Not baby.”
  • Answers “What are you doing?”, “What is this?”, and “Where?” questions dealing with familiar objects and events.

__ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_development_stages

Every child will develop at his own pace, so don’t expect him to reach every developmental milestone for his age at exactly the same time as every other child. These are guidelines to use for children in western countries.

Below is an excerpt from JD Garcia’s advanced curriculum for children ages 3 – 6, from which the Dangerous Child Manual borrows in its own curricula choices for free range Dangerous Child education.

Physical Biological
Avg.
Level
Avg.
Age
Physical Theory Physical Practice Biological Theory Biological Practice
1.00 3.00 Cause and effect The lever The human body Body care
1.25 3.25 Clubs and poles Modifying trees and
branches
Animal bodies; small
domestic animals
How to care for a pet
1.50 3.50 Different stones and their
properties
Using stones Edible plants and their
properties
Gathering edible plants
and mushrooms
1.75 3.75 Shaping stone Building simple stone tools Edible animals and fish Hunting and fishing
2.00 4.00 Shaping wood with stone Using stone tools to
modifu poles and clubs
Food preparation and
preservation
Cleaning and preparing
small game and fish using
bone, wood, and stone
2.25 4.25 Handling fire Use of stone and wood to
control fire, use of fire to
harden spear points
Advanced food preparation Cooking vegetables, fish,
and meat on open fires
2.50 4.50 Advanced fire handling
and control combining
wood and stone tools,
theory and design
Hafted axes and choppers
are made; stone fire
carriers, simple weaving
and knotting of vines and
leather
Elementary tanning and
use of bone, vines, and
vegetable fiber
Skinning animals and fish,
preserving leather,
advanced cooking.
preparing vines and
vegetable fiber
2.75 4.75 The bow and fire-making Making bows and starting
fires
Advanced food
preparation; advanced
tanning and bone work
Advanced cooking; clothes
from animal hides; use of
sinew and thongs; hunting
with dogs
3.00 5.00 The use of clay and the
bow and arrow; design of
simple rafts
Making and baking clay
pots on an open fire;
making and using simple
bows and arrows
Advanced food preparation
including drying, smoking,
& curing; health care
Cooking, drying, and
smoking with clay pots;
preparing and using
medicinal herbs and
poultices
3.25 5.25 Advanced paleolithic stone
work of knives and axes;
advanced bow making;
advanced clay work
without wheel; large rafts
Making stone tools to
make other stone tools;
making advanced bows
and arrows; bellows and
advanced pottery; building
a large raft as a group
project
Gathering seeds and
planting edible plants;
basic first aid
Gardening; preparing soil
and cultivation; practice of
first aid
3.50 5.50 Neolithic tools;
construction of shelters;
advanced counting; how to
make a small dugout canoe
and paddle
Construction of simple
neolithic tools; the use of
tally marks and stored
pebbles; building a small
dugout canoe and paddle
The biological need for
shelter; building of lean-tos and simple teepees;
clothes for extreme cold;
simple agriculture
Construction of lean-tos
and teepees; more
advanced gardening;
making bone needles and a
parka
3.75 5.75 How to construct advanced
neolithic tools and work
stone and wood; more
advanced counting and
Arabic numbers to 10; how
to build a large dugout
canoe
Building advanced
neolithic tools; working
wood, simple carpentry,
building semi-permanent
structures; advanced
tallying systems; building a
large dugout canoe
How to make boots and
moccasins from leather and
plant fiber; how to know
when to plant and when to
harvest; taking care of
goats and sheep
Construction of complete
wardrobes of leather, plant,
and animal fiber; more
advanced gardening and
animal husbandry

Psychosocial

Integration
Avg.
Level
Avg.
Age
Psychosocial Theory Pyschosocial Practice Integrative Theory Integrative Practice
1.00 3.00 How to communicate Exchange of information Ethics of personal
obligation
Free-form drawing and
painting, simple songs
1.25 3.25 Clubs and poles Repeat same message from
different source
Truth and lying, paleolithic
stories
Free-form drawing and
painting, paleolithic
stories, drums
1.50 3.50 Games of information Teams for sending and
receiving messages
Advantages of cooperating
vs competing; paleolithic
stories
Songs, dancing, drawing,
painting, telling stories
1.75 3.75 Making pictures for
information
communication
Drawing picture stories Obligations of making
oneself understood
Free-form art, stick-figure
drawing for stories
2.00 4.00 Advanced picture stories Making up stories with
pictures
Ethics of separating fact
from fiction; paleolithic
stories
Wood carving and free-form painting; paleolithic
stories created and drawn
2.25 4.25 Picture symbols which
stand for complex events
Team communications
games and “charades”
using picture symbols
The difference between a
symbol and the thing it
symbolizes; paleolithic
stories
Charcoal drawing on bark
and stone; universal
religious symbols; creating
stories
2.50 4.50 Advanced picture symbols
and counting
Making up stories by
stringing together picture
symbols which everyone
can understand
Creation myths of
paleolithic people
Making up creation myths
and testing them
2.75 4.75 Rebus writing combined
with picture writing
Making up stories with
rebus and picture writing
Advanced creation myths
of Native Americans and
some religious beliefs,
symbols
Native American art and
what it expresses; free-form art for what students
value
3.00 5.00 The notion of an alphabet
and sound symbols
Stringing sound symbols
together to make a word
The religions of native
Americans and the
evolutionary ethic
Percussion instruments,
music, carving, dance, and
art to express religious
feelings
3.25 5.25 Reading advanced
paleolithic stories with
evolutionary ethical theme
Writing simple stories and
accounts using alphabet,
rebus writing, or pictures
as desired
The importance of
separating truth from
fiction in our writing to
avoid misleading others
Late paleolithic art and
religion; student’s
expression of his own
feelings about them
3.50 5.50 Reading stories and history
of early neolithic life with
evolutionary ethics theme
More writing of stories and
accounts using alphabet,
rebus writing, and pictures
as desired
Simple analysis of
neolithic culture and
religions in light of the
evolutionary ethic
Neolithic art and stone
carving; clay figurines;
self-expression of students
3.75 5.75 Reading more complex
stories of neolithic life
about religion and
creativity in ancient Jericho
and Mesopotamia
More writing of stories and
accounts using alphabet
and rebus writing, but no
pictures, show difficulty of
communicating numerical
concepts over 10
Analysis of why neolithic
culture advanced so slowly
before the beginning of
Sumer; the energy that
went into religious ritual &
the corrupt priestly
bureaucracy
The flute and harp and the
neolithic music possible
for them; advanced
neolithic art and religion;
self-expression in all art
media

__ John David Garcia Curriculum ages 3-6
You can see that this curriculum goes far beyond Waldorf and Montessori “experiential” methods in developing the child’s physical, mental, and psychosocial integration. It is important to emphasise moral and executive function development at the same time, given the advanced skills training the child is receiving.

The Garcia curriculum is meant to encourage early mental and physical development, but unlike the Dangerous Child Method, it doesn’t start until age 3. A Dangerous Child begins his training at birth, preferably before — even before conception. More on that approach later.

Conventional dumbed-down schooling and child-raising involves immersing the child deeply into the consensual delusion, shaping the child to become a lifelong incompetent adolescent who requires spoonfeeding her entire life. That is not the Dangerous Child way.

Dangerous Children should be kept away from television and most popular music and entertainment as much as possible until he has developed broad skills competence — physical, mental, and emotional — and accompanying self confidence. He should be capable of distinguishing between constructive and destructive lifestyles and modes of thinking. He should be well on his way toward being a natural philosopher and well innoculated from becoming an ideologue.

He will need to interact with the larger, delusional worldview eventually, so preparations for that interaction should be deliberate, measured, careful, and lifelong. Whether he goes to college and professional/graduate school, or starts a business dealing with persons from many backgrounds, he will need to face those new worlds from a position of confidence and competence, so as not to be knocked around by bullies of any kind.

That type of competence and confidence takes time to build, so it is best to begin early. Between birth and three years old, Dangerous Children are building preparatory skills, even when at play, virtually every waking moment. These foundations are immersed in games and play with the goal of reinforcing and building onto the infant’s natural love for learning and interaction with loved ones. The child associates learning with fun and personal empowerment — unless grownups do something stupid to make her think otherwise.

Remember: No television, no violent videogames, no dumbed-down popular music or culture. Those are all distractions that push the child into the consensual delusion long before she is ready for it. A few years of special care will yield a lifetime of dividends.

Rites of Passage I

Dozens of Rites of Passage On the Way to Adulthood

The long transition from the incompetence of infancy to the competence of a skilled, well-rounded, and confident adulthood, should provide many opportunities for demonstrating personal competence while discovering one’s own pace and direction of discovery and mastery over challenges. If a society — such as ours — is profoundly neglectful and negligent in providing for these successive rites and opportunities for competency acquisition and confirmation, it will be rewarded with lifelong adolescents who lack both competency and confidence.

Although it may never be too late to have a Dangerous Childhood, it may be too late to learn competencies at your peak learning window. That is a pity, but only one of many, and not to be cried over. If you are 30 or 40 years old or more, and still trying to find your “vision quest” or “rite of passage”, you have been ill treated by well-meaning parents and society. Do what you can to make up for it in yourself, but try not to perpetuate the crime on future generations.

Think of this analogy: Baby birds have to first crack their way out of their hard shells. Then they have to learn to leave the nest without killing themselves. They have to learn to fly, feed, survive. Then they must find mates, raise their young, migrate with the seasons, over and over again. In the same way, baby humans have a lifetime of competence learning and testing ahead of them.

Modern humans of affluent societies wish to spare their young from all of those difficulties. That is the worst thing they could do. Modern college professors too often tell students what to think rather than preparing them to competently mind-wrestle all comers. Such indoctrination — a hallmark of a modern university education — is likewise the worst possible approach. And so it goes, as the mass consensus culture takes the place of parents and schools, creating an artificial layer of delusion and “protection in numbers” around the citizen.

As new generations of incompetents work their way further into the control rooms of government and society, expect things to get harder for almost everyone. These are the times when you want maximum competence for yourself and those around you. More

It is easy to see that the numbers are against those who wish to bring about a Dangerous Society of Dangerous Children. For the Dangerous Child, there is no end to learning and the development and practise of competence, from birth until death. It is exactly that type of mindfulness to a child’s upbringing that most modern parents rebel against.

A brief hint of what we are talking about can be seen in the experience of the Robinson children. Arthur Robinson homeschooled his six children as a single father, using a self-teaching method of homeschooling that he devised himself. The children first taught themselves to learn, then taught themselves difficult subject matter — achieving college level mastery of calculus and physics by the age of 16.

But more, the Robinson children mastered the art of self-sufficiency in performing vital tasks on the family ranch/farm. Teaching themselves to be responsible for livestock and important household functions was likely as important as any part of their academic curriculum.

As the children aged, their level of responsibility for the household and ranch grew, along with their level of sophistication in study topics and materials. __ https://alfinnextlevel.wordpress.com/2014/02/07/who-stole-our-rites-of-passage/

Most parents who wish to raise Dangerous Children could glean a lot of good ideas from the Robinson experience, and the Robinson Curriculum.

As we wander more deeply into the theory and practise of The Dangerous Child Method, it will become clear that something more is involved than simply leading the child into self-teaching and self-development, and preparing him for professional, occupational, intellectual, and financial competence and self-sufficiency.

Dangerous Children are skilled in ways that most modern parents and educators would never imagine or think necessary. This is because most parents, educators, and other moderns suffer under the tunnel-vision delusion of the mass consensus culture. They cannot imagine a future for children that involves the transcending of the mass consensus. The very idea would frighten not only parents and educators, but anyone with a stake in modern media, academia, government, and popular culture.

To develop and maintain these many skills, Dangerous Children must undergo dozens of successive rights of passage, in every stage of his life.

We will look more deeply into the staging of competence rites as we look more closely at the curriculum concept, and how it applies to Dangerous Child training. It will quickly become obvious that once the child achieves a level of mastery in particular areas, he will be inventing his own curriculum — with assistance — for the rest of his life.