Combat Flow Training: Relaxing into Dynamic Linked Chaos

Staying Alive is a Dynamic, Chaotic Affair: You Must Learn to Flow With the Go

Get Out of the Box!

Just as Neo needed to understand that there is no spoon in the film The Matrix, you need to realize that there is no box to step outside of. Once you start with a box you have already created something in your mind that limits your creativity because the box doesnt really exist…

the fight is what it is; it is less about what you want to do versus what you have to do. As we always say to students, “as long as it is within the laws of physics and human physiology don’t ever let anyone tell you what you can’t do.”

from the basic principles one is able to develop a multitude of responses and you are not limited by them but eventually you begin to learn to manipulate them at will. From there, you are, for the most part, only limited by your imagination because there is no box. __ 188 Contact Flow vs. Combat Flow

Developing an instinctive and effective approach to personal combat is only one part of an integrated survival system. But if you do not pass the test of face to face survival when you or your family are attacked, you will not be able to proceed to the other aspects of the survival continuum. To make the best use of your training time, strip the process to the basics, then go crazy (in a figurative sense).

Some essential aspects of defence and survival:

• PHYSICAL Self-defense, weaponry
• EMOTIONAL Mindset, coping tools
• FINANCIAL Investments, holdings, barter
MEDICAL Self-help, first aid, food, water
• TOOLS
• HOUSING
• COMMUNICATIONS, TRANSPORTATION

__ http://attackproof.com/survival.html

Notice that self-defence and weaponry are only the tip of the iceberg. Yes, they are the penetrating tip, the sharp point and edge. But they are only the beginning. Developing the underlying foundation is crucial for motivation, focus, persistence, and impulse control.

Combat flow exercises are designed to train your subconscious reactions, so that you will not have to take the time to think about what you must do to stay alive.

Take what works and drop the tinsel wrapping. You do not have the time to waste on empty ritual or tradition which has nothing to do with the fight at hand. Aikido, for example, is an excellent training method to develop the mind and body for many forms of dynamic combat. But focus on what works, and drop the ritual.

Survival is something that often takes place up close and personal. It is important to get out of the mental straitjacket that unrealistic television and movie portrayals have wrapped around your brain.

Close quarters shooting and self-defence:

Videos are Not Training; Training is Not Fighting

Unless you are in possession of “Matrix-class” virtual reality, you need to partner with other persons to train.

Movement flow exercises for fitness and pre-combat conditioning

Basic philosophy, applications, drills of flowing combat:

You can fast forward to the training exercises roughly 20 minutes in. Learning to close with the opponent is a key aspect of surviving an inevitable attack.

These exercises are very basic and introductory. The purpose is to develop the right instincts in training, so that in case of a fight you will react effectively, instantly. All videos presented here are mere introductions, meant to suggest different approaches to training you may choose to take.

Importantly, avoiding and evading violent conflict is almost always your best bet — particularly when innocents and loved ones are in the vicinity — and it is possible to move them out of danger.

A well-trained, mentally prepared person’s competence shows in his confident bearing and demeanour. Such a person will be seen as a “hard target” by predators. Persons who project fear, on the other hand, will attract conflict and attack. Likewise, persons who behave in an arrogant and antagonistic manner are magnets for violent and unbalanced persons.

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Newborns and Infants: Early Training

Before the child is old enough to walk or talk, or to begin training in controlled movement, music, art, and language — from birth to about 1 year — is the time to begin shaping critical brain – body connections and correspondences.

The child is born with most of the brain cells he will have as an adult, and with far more synaptic connections. These numbers are determined by the child’s gene expression and his environment within the womb.

Early in life, before and during “the synaptic pruning” (PDF) up to early adolescence, is a prime time to take advantage of early childhood brain plasticity. Early infancy is a particularly dynamic time, when both pruning and rapid synaptic formation are occurring simultaneously. By the ages of 3-5, pruning begins to outpace new synaptic formation — as the young brain continues to specialise (and limit) itself. The early environment of infants (and toddlers) makes a huge difference in the ultimate competence of the child’s brain.

Infants learn the particular quality of sounds in human languages that are spoken within his hearing. Familiarity with these early language sounds facilitates later language learning of the particular language(s) that the young infant hears. For example, if a child is destined to grow up and make his way in China, it is better if he hears proper “Chinese” spoken during his early months of life.

The same applies to music, which is but another form of auditory “language.” Music heard during the first few months of life will not be remembered as an adult, but its effects on the young brain will be profound — in terms of brain rhythms and subtle brain logics. It will influence the child’s later learning of language, maths, and, of course, music itself.

Movement training for newborns and young infants is a far more subtle thing than it will be at the toddler stage. It is best with the very young to combine movement training with simple holding, massage, and soft gentle rhythmic speech to accompany the subtle movements.

Again, the older child or adult will never remember these early trainings. But the deep, pre-verbal brain that forms the core of later learning will not forget.

Art training for the very young is just as much tactile as visual. Objects of various shapes should hang above his crib, and adorn the walls. Gently and slowly allowing the baby to feel surface textures of various items, as well as their shapes, edges, and temperatures, helps to form early concepts of art. As soon as the baby’s vision becomes clearer, allow the baby experiences that reinforce the correspondence between what he sees and what he feels.

Reading or telling stories to the child is excellent training in the prosody — the timing, accents, emphasis, and melody — of language. The child will not remember the stories as such, but more and more of the words and style of spoken language will stay with the child, over the months.

Infants should be raised within an enriched sensory environment, where they can trust that their needs will be met promptly, and their safety and comfort considered. Allowances for ample sleep and proper diet must be made.

As the child grows in infancy, movement training can become more vigorous — and even somewhat rowdy, depending upon the infant’s sensibilities. Bungee devices that allow the infant to initiate movements he would not otherwise be able to make, expand his imagination of movement. Zip line devices will teach basic gravitational concepts — even to children who may not tolerate being tossed gently into the air and caught.

As the child’s senses are refined, provide him with toys and safe objects of various distinct shapes. Children love spherical balls and cubic blocks, but they also need exposure to pyramids, other polyhedra, various classical curves, and objects that demonstrate symmetry and perspective. Rudimentary artistic puzzles are very useful.

By the time the child is ready to begin walking, he should have been exposed to applied art, such as simple machines and simple construction.

Whether the child creeps, crawls, rolls, or ambulates in other interesting ways, such early body movements should quickly be made goal directed — in the same way that reaching for a mobile that hangs above the infant’s crib is goal directed. Problem-solving should be made an early part of the infant’s life, and posed as a slowly graduated phenomenon. Expect setbacks, and be prepared to begin again at an earlier level from time to time.

Early infancy training should not detract from sleep, meals, play, outdoor time, or other normal occupations of infancy. In fact, the training should be seamlessly rolled into play, meals, going to sleep, waking up, exploring the outdoors, etc.

What the infant experiences during early infancy will help determine how well his mechanisms of gene expression can lay the foundations for later learning and development.

Very few children in the history of the world have been raised optimally, according to their unique needs, and the nature of their world. While it is true that young children possess significant resiliency, it is also true that you will never see the child’s missed opportunities to develop unique personal skills that might have served him well in later life.

Infants should be sung to (and with), have music played to them with various instruments, be held and moved safely in a comforting way — but in ways that gradually help expand his sense of movement. Stories should be told with expression and emotion, and ended in a way that leaves the infant settled and comforted.

Match the child’s facial expressions and body movements, as he grows older and begins to incorporate motor “mirroring.” As he learns to mirror your expressions and motions, his brain is learning how to physically respond to the outside environment.

These are a few of the ways that early infancy training can be shaped to morph cleanly into the Dangerous Child training for toddlers and pre-school children.

Dangerous Child training begins, of course, well before conception. And it continues throughout the prenatal period.

But it is often difficult for parents to visualise how one could possibly apply the Dangerous Skills taught to pre-adolescent and adolescent youth, to newborns and very young infants. Providing these few examples provides grist for the imagination.

Thanks to advanced psychology and neuroscience, it is never too late to have a Dangerous Childhood. But the earlier the training is begun, the more profound its effects over a lifetime.

More from “Doman-Mom:”

1. Teach joyfully
You must approach the game of learning with the same abandonment and enthusiasm you would approach the game of patty cake or peek a boo. All children are drawn to joyousness. Your attitude towards a subject determines his. Never approach your teaching with soberness and seriousness. Learning is the greatest game you will play with your child: keep it as such. Present learning as a privilege he has earned: never, never as a chore.
2. Teach clearly
When we talk to tiny children, we naturally talk to them in a loud, clear voice. Teach your tiny child in such a voice and make your materials large and clear. Present the information in an honest, factual, and straightforward way. If you give a tiny child the facts, he will discover the rules that govern them.
3. Teach quickly
You must teach your tiny child quickly and briefly. He has much to do and can’t stay in one place long. You must be content to teach him for only a few seconds at a time. That is all it takes. Present him with a set of information, and then come back to it later. When you teach in many ten- and fifteen-second sessions, you can accomplish more than you ever imagined possible.
4. Always leave him hungry for more
You must always, always, always stop before your child wants you to stop. Always stop before he wants to stop. Be sensitive to your child’s attention and mood, and leave him hungry for more, every time, without fail.
5. Teach only at the best times
The key to teaching your tiny child is to only do so at the best possible times. Never try and teach him in a distracting, chaotic environment. Never try and teach him at a time when he is hungry, tired, or out of sorts. Never try and teach him when you are out of sorts. You must be ever-discerning of your child’s temperament and mood and be willing to put your teaching away for the morning or day if needed.
6. Teach with consistency
If you are to be successful in teaching you must teach with consistently. If you child is to remain interested you must keep the ball rolling. Starting and stopping constantly will cause him to lose interest because he will believe the information you are bringing out again is old hat. Organize yourself to teach in such a way as to be able to remain consistent in your endeavors.
7. Teach new information
You will be surprised at how quickly your tiny child learns new information. Don’t go over the same information over and over again when he already knows it. You must be keen to sense when he knows something, and regularly give him that which is fresh and new.
8. Teach as a gift
We have come to equate teaching and testing as two sides of the same coin. You must forget this notion if you are to be successful in teaching your tiny child. Teaching is the process of giving information, as you would give a gift. Testing is asking for it back. Never test your child. It is essentially disrespectful and he will sense that you don’t trust that he knows the information. If he learns that your teaching always has strings attached, he will push you and your teaching away. Learning is a gift, the most precious one you can give your child.

__ http://domanmom.com/2010/11/the-principles-of-teaching-tiny-children/

Good advice — except for the part about never testing the child.  Life itself is a test, and if you never put your child into situations that challenge and test him, you are treading the edges of parental malpractise.  Domanmom has a good heart, but like most well-meaning and kindly moms she fails to see what is coming, and why growing children to be Dangerous is so important.

Learning to Fly, Navy Seal Training, SCUBA Training

Overcoming Limits

Most children grow up with a large number of unnecessary self-imposed limitations. Not knowing their options, and not understanding their own capabilities, are two of the biggest reasons for kids unnecessarily limiting themselves. But in many cases, these unnecessary limits have been placed on children by parents, schools, and other institutions of society.

In order to help Dangerous Children to stretch their limits, they are recommended to master a wide range of “mobility skills,” including flying, swimming, SCUBA, boating, navigation, mountaineering, survival in several difficult environments, and stealth.

In the US, a youth must be 16 years old to solo in a powered aircraft, and 17 years old to obtain a private pilot license. Unpowered gliders can be soloed at age 14. Source

Aviation Summer Camps

US Civil Air Patrol Cadet program

One of many online ground schools for pilots

Kids can learn to fly — both ground school and flight school — while quite young, if accompanied by a licensed pilot. Al Fin’s father began teaching him to fly around the age of 8.

Flight school will help kids pass their written exam, then they can log flight instruction hours from a licensed instructor. They can solo at age 16, spend a year accumulating cross-country flight hours and other required hours, then pass their flight and oral exams at age 17. What they do after this is up to them — Dangerous Children can support themselves at least 3 different ways by the age of 18, so they can choose how to spend their own funds.

Here is a good list of SCUBA training programs for kids

Some mountaineering and climbing camps

Al Fin learned to SCUBA and rock climb from close friends as a teen, then went on to get more advanced training and experience from instructors.

Summer Sailing Camps for Kids

Al Fin taught himself to sail, and lived to tell about it! Was finally released from that Cuban prison camp when he convinced Fidel that he was not a Yanqui spy. Not recommended. 😉

Public Navy Seal Training Programs Age 16 and Up

Extreme Seal Experience
Popular write-up of the program

Sealfit

Other high adrenaline adventures:

Covert Ops “missions”
Intense 2 and 4 day training missions

Simulators are Getting Better

Affordable simulators for a number of air, ground, and water vehicles have been available for a number of years. The same is true for reasonably realistic war gaming and combat simulators. But as affordable, high quality virtual reality arrives, the best simulators are likely to move to VR, accompanied by a number of realistic dynamic seats and platforms for a more believable experience.

Dangerous Children will be able to learn long-distance navigation, reconnaissance, and rendezvous skills via air, sea, undersea, and ground, at much younger ages than they will be able to obtain licenses for the sophisticated vehicles that will be simulated. Orienteering — with and without GPS and other electronics — can be easily integrated into the simulation exercises. Kids would rather participate in realistic adventures containing a certain element of danger, and realistic simulations will help to prepare Dangerous Children for the real thing.

Some advanced medical and surgical training simulators

Each Dangerous Child is Unique

Each child has different aptitudes, inclinations, and maturity levels. Dangerous Children are taught impulse control and emotional balancing at an early age, as well as other executive function skills. Dangerous Child motor skills training is also particularly advanced, allowing the child and youth a higher level of confidence when confronted with potentially hazardous situations.

But some children will be ready for some training at age 8 or 10, while others may need to wait until 12, 14, or even 16. Development and maturation of mind and body occur at different times for different children.

As we begin to lay out curricular timelines, we will attempt to present them as age ranges rather than fixed ages.

Dangerous Children Often Learn to Swim Before Learning to Crawl

Dangerous Children are trained to feel at home in the water, on solid ground, high in the air, and in other environments that would frighten most “ordinary” children — who naturally pick up the fears of their parents.

Infants Take to the Water Naturally, if Taught https://www.infantswim.com/
Infants Take to the Water Naturally, if Taught
https://www.infantswim.com/

The image above illustrates infant swimming and infant self-rescue.

… “self-rescue,” [is when] babies are taught to hold their breath underwater, kick their feet, turn over to float on their backs and rest until help arrives. The technique … was pioneered in the late ’60s by Harvey Barnett, who at 18 became determined to teach infants to swim after the drowning of a neighbor’s child. His methods have spread around the world — taught in clinics and imitated widely. “It gives the baby the best possible chance,” he says. Julie Bosman

Residential swimming pools in the U.S.: 10.4 million

Accidental, nonboating drownings of children 14 or younger in the U.S. every day: 2

Babies who have been taught ‘self-rescue’ technique through Barnett’s infant-swimming program: Almost 300,000 __ NYT

There are plenty of techniques and schools for teaching infants to swim. Before the age of 6 months, children possess a “diving reflex,” which causes them to hold their breaths automatically, when submerged. More

Here is one mom’s experience of using the Doman method for teaching her baby to swim.

Basic Safety Rules:

1. Always, always, always supervise your baby. It doesn’t matter how good of a swimmer they are – they need adult supervision at all times. Do not become complacent thinking that your baby can save themselves if they fell in. Ever. You need to have the same (or more) vigilance as if they had never seen a pool a day in their life. Drowning is a leading cause of death in young children and 85% of these deaths were completely preventable with proper supervision.

2. Strongly emphasize from day one that baby may never, never enter the pool without you first giving the signal and being right there. Be consistent and they will learn.

3. Be joyous in your teaching! Your baby will pick up on your attitude. Always be enthusiastic, happy, and full of laughter and excitement, even if your baby might be timid. Babies will feed off of your composure.

4. Watch your baby carefully for distress, and never push him beyond slight discomfort. The key is to be gradual and patient. If he does not like something, do the exercise for just a split second and then praise him profusely. Hug him, kiss him, tell him how wonderful he is, and celebrate his accomplishment. Perhaps repeat one more time, then go onto something else. A little bit every day leads to substantial progress over time.

5. If your baby does not enjoy the water at all, do not try and do these exercises until he is comfortable in water. Start small, just by getting him used to walking around in the water while you hold him. Encourage him to splash, watch you get your face wet or blow bubbles, or play with toys. Once he is comfortable, gradually build in more exercises into your routine. The bathtub is also a great place to introduce splashing, bubble blowing, floating on back, and getting their faces a little wet while you rinse them off.

6. Try to swim at least three days a week to achieve the best result. Swimming every day is ideal!

As some encouragement for you, here is a video of my baby I took two days ago of him swimming underwater. If it makes anybody feel better, just a few weeks ago he hated putting his face in the water and would often swallow water whenever I put him under! Now he swims with great joy and even since this video, he has progressed! He now kicks his little feet and swims farther and longer underwater, and he also no longer nose dives to the bottom of the pool but stays relatively near the surface! __ DomanMom

Amazing baby swim videos:

The idea is not to make children so fearless that they will take ridiculous chances. The idea is instead to build a child’s confidence through accomplishment and guided challenge.

Dangerous Children are not meant to spend their lives sitting at a desk like a wage slave, or lounging on a sofa like a couch potato. They are meant to move through water, over land, into the sky, and beyond.

To that end, they should be packed along with parents when backpacking, sailing, skiing, and other outdoor activities. They should learn bungee jumping and bouncing at an early age (with professional assistance), as well as zip lines (video).

Pregnant mothers are encouraged to stay active, while observing safe limits — no high dives off Acapulco, no fast downhill skiing on ice, no frozen waterfall climbing free solo, etc. Dancing, swimming, brisk walking, and low impact aerobics are fine. Babies like to move — even before birth.

Babies can hear spoken language and music while in the womb. They learn to adapt to a mother’s style of movement and voice tones before birth. An active mother is more apt to birth an active child, via both nature and nurture.

Dangerous Child training is all about giving the child an early start, then building up from there — with everything geared toward the child’s aptitudes and personality type. For the early years, playfulness is key, along with love, honesty, and close watchfulness.

Early years foundational training provides a solid base of competence and confidence on which to build. Playful movement, music, language, and art are accessible to babies and extremely potent for brain-building and brain-body coordination.

A Playful Foundation of Music, Dance, Art, and Language

Children are Born with Primed Brains

In the real world, babies are born with brains primed to learn language, movement, elements of music, and symbolic art. This is in stark opposition to the leftist belief in “the blank slate (PDF)” or tabula rasa view of the human brain.

In other words, the baby’s brain is predisposed to a rapid learning of language — preferably multiple languages — and music, movement, and art. Such learning can commence quite early — before birth — proceeding in a playful manner until the early lessons are learnt well enough to build upon.

Sensitive Periods of Brain Development
Sensitive Periods of Brain Development

The brain is most sensitive to particular types of learning at different stages of development. Good habits and emotional control should be learned in the early years, no later than 5 or 6 years. These are particularly important traits for later learning — particularly self-monitored learning.

Language and music should be learned early — and together. Multiple languages are best learned before the age of 9 or 10. Music cognition complements language cognition, just as language learning can be combined with music learning in songs and rhymes.

Music learning likewise complements spatial and number / size learning — so that music learning can be an important forerunner to maths learning. Keyboards and fretboards are spatial in nature, and counting and “sizing” of intervals are part of learning such instruments.

Dance movement and other rhythmic movements have been linked to improved executive function in young children. Dancing can be learned even before walking, with a bit of assistance and gravity mitigation. Rhythmic and choreographed movements involved in playful dancing are good training for the cerebellum and basal ganglia of the brain, as well as for insular cortex training.

Visual art is fun and excellent eye-hand training. The development of artistic judgment and perspective boosts spatial development while giving the child a sense of confidence in creating something that others can appreciate.

All four of these playful pre-school activities are full of opportunities for learning creativity. Art and music should be innately creative, as the child’s senses of vision and hearing develop. But dance and language can be equally as creative if allowed to be.

The early years also present a preview into the child’s later strengths and preferences. If a child is a budding prodigy of art, music, language, or movement, it will be difficult for him to conceal his talent if it has been allowed to develop in a playful, creative manner.

The child should have the opportunity to observe skilled adult musicians, artists, writers, dancers, and craftsmen at work. It is never too early to begin to set goals. But the child’s efforts should be appreciated for what they are, as long as he has put his heart into them.

A human brain is not fully developed until around the middle of the third decade, and remains in its prime for only about ten years before beginning to subtly lose ground. The earlier a child can find a strong talent for independent learning and skills-building, the longer the part of his life that he can develop and exercise that talent.

A television will not do much to help a young child, nor will a computer — at least as computers are currently made and programmed. Children need to see that human beings create music, art, stories, and dance. If a child is particularly talented in a given area, he should be encouraged — but not forced. If the motivation is not there, forcing the child will only prevent him from finding a talent he is willing to develop.

Play is the strongest motivator for young children. During this period, children crave the company of their parents and other family members. It is the period of greatest opportunity for self-development and foundation-building for the child. If this time is squandered by day care and television watching, it can never be retrieved.

Once simple play has lost its appeal, and once the child no longer craves a parent’s company, if the child has not learned good habits and self-control, a parent’s ability to guide the child becomes severely limited. Hasta la vista, baby.

This is important: A young child’s mind is a sponge. Be very careful what you allow it to soak in. You cannot take it back, once it is absorbed.

More on early foundations in future entries.

Dangerous Children: Learning to Move

Movement is a vital part of infancy and childhood, for boys and for girls. Children often show an aptitude for rhythmic movement long before learning to crawl, or walk. This capacity should be adapted into purposeful dance and other movement skills as early as possible. With practise, a child can master skilled movements in an astonishingly short time.

Toddlers Dance http://www.columbiamissourian.com/m/17876/dancing-arm-in-arm/

Hold me closer tiny dancerThe earliest form of dance instruction should take place in the home, in a safe, comfortable, and playful environment.

Alternate fast and slow songs, and change the way you dance to each dramatically. For instance, get on your knees, assume a dancing pose with your toddler, and rock back and forth with your toddler to a slow dance. Then, when the fast song comes on, get up and shake that slow song out.

Clap with your toddler to each beat in several songs that exhibit different time signatures. Children’s songs are often written with four beats per measure, but grownups know that this is just one type of time signature that can be danced to.

Teach basic dance movements, one at a time, after your toddler has developed confidence with keeping time. Enrolling in a dance class together or buying an instructional video will keep your child from feeling overwhelmed in a crowd. — Teach Toddlers to Dance

As the child’s coordination and skills develop, parents may consider offering the child the opportunity to attend a children’s dance studio:

It may seem like a wise idea to put your least experienced teacher with the “baby” classes because of the technical level of the class, but in fact the opposite is true. Toddler ballet and creative movement are the most challenging classes to instruct at my studio. Due to their importance and complex nature, I teach all of them myself—even though I’m a busy studio owner. An experienced teacher’s class should introduce technique using creative pedagogy and also teach students how to participate in a classroom environment. A confident teacher will follow these guidelines with exuberance, creating a fun class that will keep students coming back for years! __ https://childrensdanceeducator.wordpress.com/

Teach them to Juggle!
Juggling is not just for mimes and circus clowns. It is a useful skill for training coordination and sure-handedness in a tight spot. And the skill can be taught to very young children, with the right approach.

There is some question as to whether juggling should be taught to beginners with slow moving scarves, or with balls. After many years of teaching juggling, and reviewing the small amount of research addressing this question, my opinion is as follows.

Children in fourth grade and up are usually capable of learning to juggle with balls or beanbags, so they should use them. My experience has been that when they learn with scarves first, balls seem more difficult. However, this is not to say that scarves should not be allowed. Although I much prefer them to learn with balls, if I feel a student is becoming overly frustrated I will give them scarves. __ TeachCircus

Light foam balls, wiffle balls, and tightly wadded sheets of paper or aluminium foil can also serve as “slow” balls for beginning jugglers.

Dancing and juggling can lead to more complex movement skills, such as martial arts. Kids who learn unarmed martial arts skills and self-discipline are better able to learn to use sports implements such as golf clubs, tennis raquets, fencing foils, and baseball bats as natural extensions of their own bodies.

Teach them to manipulate Sticks

Children love to swing sticks and other objects around in the darndest ways. The earlier they are taught to handle sticks skillfully with good control, the earlier you will be able to relax if you are hiking with your small child and he begins swinging and twirling a stick he has found.

Example: Devil Sticks

Devil Sticks are a manipulative skill, derived from a form of staff manipulation practiced in China. One large stick is manipulated with two smaller sticks that are held in the hands. Devil Sticks have become popular with kids recently, and many students may already own a set.
__ Teach Circus

What many young boys really want to do with sticks is to fight with them, like swords or staves. They should be taught to do so safely and responsibly.

You will likely want to start your very young children with foam sticks or “boffers.” Hollow foam “sticks” may work for starters, very inexpensively.

Hollow Foam Tubes
If a child learns to manipulate “sticks” quickly, consider a latex or foam sword before moving to something harder.Once latex or foam wrapped “sticks” are mastered, the child can move on to rattan, to be used with protective gear.

you will need a good pair of rattan sticks (also called kali sticks) to spar with your training partner. This weapon is approximately 26 inches in length and is relatively slender. It is hard, yet lightweight, durable and inexpensive.

Most importantly, the rattan stick is also safer than wood because it does not splinter on impact. It simply frays and shreds apart. This is especially important when performing full contact stick combat techniques with your training partner. Kali sticks allow the fighters to engage in full contact training, however protective gear (i.e., fencing masks, hand protection, arm and elbow pads, throat and chest protectors, groin cup, etc) must be worn at all times…

KNOW YOUR FOUR DEFENSIVE OPTIONS
During a stick fight, you only have four possible defensive options. Make certain you can execute all four of these responses with ease and efficiency when fighting with rattan sticks.

Evasion – you can move out of the angle of the stick attack.
Deflection – you can deflect the stick attack.
Block – you can block the oncoming stick attack.
Striking – you can strike the opponent’s weapon hand with your own stick.
__ http://www.sammyfranco.com/stick_fighting.html

Stick fighting may be the only weapon many children will need to learn, other than the safe use of firearms. But others will want to move on to actual sword fighting. For them, early training with boffers and rattan will prove useful later on.

Here are some benefits of fencing training for kids:

Fencers learn good sportsmanship, self-discipline, gain quick reflexes and how to compete independently. They gain a sense of accomplishment when winning and learn to profit from their defeats. They learn to make complex decisions, analyze problems, and think fast on their feet. These ideals help children reach their potential in many areas other than fencing. __ http://www.swordsmen101.com/WhyFencing_forparents.html

There are many forms of sword fighting

Dangerous children learn self-defense and strategic/tactical thinking as a basic part of their training. But any child should learn to move gracefully and handle himself physically up to a certain point — and should particularly learn to size up situations on a moment-to-moment basis.

His survival may well depend upon it. So may yours.

Republished from Al Fin Next Level