Teaching Children to Hunt

Hunting is About Far More than Killing Game Animals

Hunting teaches children lessons that would probably not otherwise be learned for decades — if ever. While hunting, children are exposed to real world realities of predators and prey, planning and self discipline, and human to human teamwork.

Not every child will have the temperament to kill game animals. But they can learn most of the lessons of the hunt from observing and learning the painstaking preparations and hunting/stalking techniques which good hunters utilise.

http://artemisoutfitters.com/10-reasons-teach-children-hunt/

Here is a short list of benefits from teaching children to hunt, for both family and child:

  1. One of the best things about teaching your child to hunt is the bonding time it gives the two of you. In today’s world where parents and children are often going in two different directions and have little time together, hunting gives you something to do together that can leave lasting memories.
  2. You taking your son or daughter into the woods with you carries on that family tradition, as you teach them the same skills that were taught to you, your parents or your grandparents.
  3. Teach them about harvesting only what they need and the balance of taking and giving. Explain the role of hunters in conservation and what we can do to ensure land and animals will still be available for their children when the time comes.
  4. By taking them hunting and getting them involved, you’ll not only be teaching them skills and sport, but you’ll help keep hunting alive.
  5. In a world where everything moves so fast and needs to be done so quickly, teaching your child to hunt can help them connect to the outdoors and teach them to slow down and enjoy simple moments in nature.
  6. By taking your children with you hunting, you can help promote a physically fit lifestyle and show them alternatives to simply hitting the gym.
  7. From discipline, to patience, to endurance, to learning to deal with disappointment, hunting helps develop skills in your children that will turn them into well-rounded adults.
  8. By teaching them proper hunting skills and sportsmen etiquette, you’ll be teaching them responsibility that can spread into other aspects of their lives.
  9. Watching the glee and excitement on your child’s face, knowing the work, patience and skill that all had to come together for that moment [first successful hunt] is priceless.
  10. Without proper knowledge, people panic and react quickly with a gun in their hand, not knowing what to do. By teaching your children to hunt, you’ll be teaching them skills that will teach them to respect guns, not fear them.

Source

Children learn much more than is printed on the above list, simply by spending time in the safe company of parents and mentors, in the wild. But much of what children learn is nonverbal. Building strength of character under a range of challenges, is one of many nonverbal skills that pays large dividends later in life.

My daughter has been going with me since she was 7. Just this past deer season, she took her first deer. Up until then she just went and sat with me, and we would talk about everything under the moon. Teaching her about the outdoors and the importance of hunting are and were very special times, and the memories will last a lifetime. Just her being there with me was satisfying, but when she said she actually wanted to hunt, that took it to a whole new level of enjoyment. __ How to Teach Kids Hunting

Not Every Child is Cut Out for Hunting

Respect for the Wild and Wildlife is Crucial for a Budding Hunter

Nature is neither cruel nor benign. It simply is, and it doesn’t care what we think about it.

If your boy shouts, “Wow, I killed him!” or something like that, there is nothing wrong with him–he is just a boy. But he should understand that what he just killed wanted to live as badly as he does, and that he should feel sorrow as well as triumph. Other children will not relish death. If they kill, they will likely be saddened by it. This is natural too. Some youngsters are horrified by death and by the prospect of causing it. They are not meant to be hunters.

Make it clear to your kids that if they are not willing to give their all to becoming competent with gun or bow, they have no business afield. Explain to them also that if they hunt enough, they are eventually going to wound something, and it is going to escape to suffer. It may take two seasons for this to happen, or 50, but it is going to happen. All they can do is work at becoming as skilled as possible and hope it doesn’t. __ Teaching Your Child to Kill

Learning the Skills Without Killing

Just as a master fisherman can practise “catch and release” methods without killing the fish, so can skilled hunters be satisfied with nothing more than great wildlife photos taken inside the natural range of his chosen prey. In the same manner, very skilled birders must learn all the skills of a good hunter to catch his most elusive prey on film or video.

Dangerous Children will need to learn to kill as part of their training. If the child can not actually bring himself to make the kill, he will have chosen a different branch in the road of Dangerous Child training — which will probably involve less training in the violent arts than most DCs obtain.

Here is another list of benefits to youth learning to hunt:

Self-reliance: When children know how to hunt, they’ll always have a way to feed themselves, even if the unthinkable happens. They will not be stuck, relying on others to obtain food.
Food cycle: When kids learn to hunt, they gain an understanding of the food cycle. Without hunting, many children never connect the meat on their dinner plate to a living, breathing animal.
Love of the outdoors: If hunting does anything for a child, it instills a love of outdoors and a wonder at the majesty of nature. It teaches them to respect and appreciate the woods, water, and fields.
Rite of passage: For many hunting families, learning to hunt is a rite of passage. It may be the first time a child’s allowed at hunting camp during rifle season or that he has his own hunting gear. It’s an easy way to show a child you recognize he’s growing up and ready for more responsibility.
Cost savings: Although there’s a start-up cost and a yearly license fee, eating meat you harvest through hunting is an affordable way to eat healthier and save money.
Bonding: When you’re teaching children to hunt, it’s more about being together than hunting. You’re building memories, enjoying days spent together, and having experiences that can’t be found within city limits.
Health benefits: Hunting gets you outdoors and spending time in nature does great things for both your body and mind. It’s known to reduce stress, decrease blood pressure, and lead to more mindfulness.
Fitness and exercise: While you don’t have to be an Olympic athlete to enjoy hunting, you do have to be relatively physically fit. You have to walk distances, climb through brush and up mountains, and drag large game with nothing but a rope. Getting children involved in hunting shows them the importance of staying fit and creates a fun way to exercise.
Food safety: When it comes to what’s in commercial meat, it’s scary. Artificial preservatives, hormones, and antibiotics just top the list. But when children provide themselves with meat from a hunting harvest, they’re getting nothing but naturally fed meat.
Life skills: Hunting is more than sport; it’s a lesson in life. It helps youth develop character strengths such as discipline, patience, confidence, and endurance. It also teaches children how to deal with disappointment and move on to try again.
Unplugged: In this high-tech world, children are constantly plugged in. At school, they read on tablets. At home, it’s virtual reality games, and at the mall, it’s smart phones and iPods. Hunting gives children an escape from electronics and having to be in the know every minute of every day. It allows kids to unplug and just be.

__ http://ammo.com/articles/parents-guide-to-youth-hunting

Hunting is Good Training in Situational Awareness

The art of stalking and making a kill requires a heightened awareness of yourself and the environment around you. A hunter that is unaware of his surrounding may end up being the prey of a more deadly predator than himself. Or he may suffer a serious accident that was completely unnecessary.

‘Are we getting dumber or are the deer getting smarter?’
http://www.jantoo.com/cartoons/keywords/hunting-trip

As the child grows older, he learns that the world holds a lot more dangers than he might have been told about as a child. Recent vicious attacks by leftists against peaceful political rallies and public speakers reveals a hidden hostility and violence that dwells covertly inside persons of all societies and all classes. Journalists within the news and entertainment medias are beginning to display much of this previously hidden viciousness when pushed out of their ideological comfort zones.

It is not enough these days to simply avoid known danger zones and “no-go” areas. Trouble can follow you to your own front door, and beyond. Situational awareness, mastery of hunting skills, and physical fitness combined with quick reaction training are indispensible.

Where is Best Place to Raise Dangerous Children: City or Countryside?

First Consider Merits of City vs. Country in General

Advantages of City Life

  1. Easy access to schools, shopping, eating, work, and public services
  2. Wide variety of housing, jobs, special interest groups and classes, entertainments, potential friends, and potential mates
  3. In some cities you can walk everywhere or take public transport
  4. Cosmopolitan selection of foods, shopping, shows, and people

Disadvantages of City Life

  1. A general decadence and decay — particularly in cities with a higher proportion of third world peoples
  2. Ever shrinking zones of safety, as a dysgenic decline sets in
  3. Living on borrowed time in the coming dysgenic Idiocracy

City vs. Country David Holmes Youtube.com
City vs. Country David Holmes
Youtube.com

Advantages of Country Life

  1. Peace and quiet, a sky full of stars, fresh sweet air
  2. People look out for each other
  3. People are generally more self-sufficient
  4. Taxes are lower, as are many other expenses
  5. More safe zones — especially for kids

Disadvantages of Country Life

  1. You must learn to get along with neighbors, and to keep a good reputation in the community, or things can become brusque
  2. You must learn to maintain your own basic infrastructure for clean water, backup power, heat, fuel, housing, outbuildings, essential machinery, growth storage and preparation of food, etc.
  3. You will have to learn more about technology of all kinds
  4. You will need to learn to let your younger children do a lot of free-grazing (and teach them to do so safely)
  5. You will need to teach practical skills to your mid-level kids early, and insist they learn and perform them properly
  6. You will need to respect your neighbor’s religion
  7. And so on . . .

Sources:
https://alfinnextlevel.wordpress.com/2013/10/12/living-in-the-city-vs-living-in-the-countryside/

http://www.theprofessionalhobo.com/2008/09/city-life-vs-country-life-an-unbiased-analysis/

http://www.debate.org/opinions/is-country-life-better-than-city-life

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/18/live-in-city-or-country

In summary, one suspects that it may be easier to find a mate in university, church, work etc. inside or outside of cities, but better to raise kids outside of the decadent and corrupting world of cities, if possible.

How this Applies to Raising Dangerous Children in Particular

Young and very young Dangerous Children should not be allowed to plug into the addicting world of the Consensual Delusion. There is too much of crucial importance to learn, too many practical and foundational skills to develop, and too little real estate inside the growing brain to be spared for wasteful and dysfunctional mental memes of the skankstream.

Keeping a rapidly developing Dangerous Child on track from the earliest ages, requires providing a rich and nutritious mental world, without the addicting and destructive “junk food.” A healthier mental and physical environment is easier to provide outside the loud, dirty, and dysfunctional distractions that are so prevalent in cities — particularly the more multicultural cities-in-decline.

The basic in-your-face needs of country living demand more of children in the first place. A child growing up on a ranch, farm, or helping with the family business, will have to develop a range of basic skills which helicopter-parented city kids will never be exposed to — unless they move to the country themselves. So in that sense, self-sufficiency — a key part of the Dangerous Child attitude — is an intrinsic part of a good country upbringing.

Many of semi-dangerous skills learned by 10-12 year olds are readily available in the country: Welding, electrical motors and pumps, all types of electrical wiring methods, plumbing systems, backup power supplies, power tools of all kinds, heavy machinery (including implements for digging, ploughing, earth-moving, demolition, etc.).

When Dangerous Children get together on their own, they are likely to want to hunt, fish, build or repair, or practise dangerous skills in the outdoors.

Understanding how dangerous the human world is becoming, they feel an important, underlying purpose growing inside of them as they age and gain more useful skills and life competencies. They understand that if humans are to build a more expansive and abundant human future, a good part of the human substrate will have to be up to the challenges ahead.

The skankstream cathedral — working within the consensual delusion — has been hard at work attempting to destroy or corrupt the traditional ways in which children might be allowed to grow up both dangerous and responsible. The skankstream would rather have kids grow up stuck in a perpetually helpless adolescent state, dependent upon the skankstream for virtually all of their needs.

Note: It is possible that for some parents and offspring, raising a Dangerous Child is best done in the war zone of a multicultural inner city. If the child can be protected to the age that he can take care of himself on the mean streets, living in the middle of a dysgenic Idiocracy may provide some of the best lessons he will ever learn.

But in general, such experiences can be provided just as well in the more controlled setting of planned field trips into the city. One must be confronted with such dysfunction face to face in order to understand and better prepare for it, well before any in-city apprenticeships, work, or higher education.

The Dangerous Child Method is not easily applied, nor will it come naturally to large numbers of today’s young citizens, parents, and potential parents. That is why we have decided to go semi-public with many of these ideas, so that the wiser of the young will have a bit of time to prepare and debate the issues.

More: https://alfinnextlevel.wordpress.com/2015/10/23/urban-world-utopia-or-global-dysgenic-idiocracy/

Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst. To survive the coming world, you and yours will want to become Dangerous.



Town & Country  Lord of the Rings https://learningfrommiltonkeynes.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/lordoftowncountry.jpg
Town & Country Lord of the Rings
https://learningfrommiltonkeynes.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/lordoftowncountry.jpg

More: Parenting in the suburbs is lonely for housewives whose lives have no purpose . . . It is the story of modernity — adrift in alienation without a rudder or destination. These housewives should consider becoming Dangerous Children.

It is never too late to have a Dangerous Childhood.

Perspectives on Immersive Learning

Physician and futurist Peter Diamandis emphasises “immersion” in the process of learning. With the coming of virtual reality, we have yet another way to become immersed in our learning. Start with your passion, use your strengths, learn by doing — jump right in.

Peter Diamandis To An Abundant Future
Peter Diamandis
To An Abundant Future

You have to be fully immersed if you want to really learn.

Connect the topic with everything you care about — teach your friends about it, only read things that are related to the topic, surround yourself with it.

Make learning the most important thing you can possibly do and connect to it in a visceral fashion.

As part of your full immersion, dive into the very basic underlying principles governing the skill you want to acquire.

This is an idea Elon Musk (CEO of Tesla, SpaceX) constantly refers to: “The normal way we conduct our lives is we reason by analogy. We are doing this because it’s like what other people are doing. [With first principles] you boil things down to the most fundamental truths … and then reason up from there.”

You can’t skip the fundamentals — invest the time to learn the basics before you get to the advanced stuff.

… In the future, the next big shift in learning will happen as we adopt virtual worlds and augmented reality.

It will be the next best thing to “doing” — we’ll be able to simulate reality and experiment (perhaps beyond what we can experiment with now) in virtual and augmented environments.

Add that to the fact that we’ll have an artificial intelligence tutor by our side, showing us the ropes and automatically customizing our learning experience. ___ Peter Diamandis

Immersive learning has long been popular and effective for learning foreign languages. Living and traveling in foreign countries forces one to go beyond comfort boundaries, and learn repeatedly on the fly.

Homeschooled and distance learning students can take advantage of field trips, mini-apprenticeships, virtual reality learning, and role-playing educational environments.

… role-playing adventures in Quest Atlantis (http://viewpure.com/1YookRDby3Y?ref=bkmk) may have you apprenticing as a journalist, archaeologist, historian, mathematician, geneticist, astrophysicist, astronaut, politician, etc. You may also need to meet with people in these careers in real-life as well to gain their perspective on the problems you must solve. These dilemmas are authentic ones requiring thoughtful and personal responses. You will learn that most important questions seldom have black or white solutions. Your options will not be the usual T/F or multiple choice solutions. __ https://immersivetechnology.edublogs.org/

The above online forms of immersive learning are relatively low-tech and inexpensive. High tech immersive learning centres such as CISL Stanford takes simulated immersive learning to another level.

Why use simulation in particular situations, rather than learning on the job from the start? Some jobs are rather delicate — such as transplant surgery or working with ultra-expensive or ultra-hazardous equipment. For many modern jobs, putting in time on a complex simulator before touching the patient or the machinery, is helpful.

“Simulation” is a set of techniques – not a technology per se – to replace or amplify real experiences with planned experiences, often immersive in nature, that evoke or replicate substantial aspects of the real world in a fully interactive fashion.

“Immersive” conveys the sense that participants have of being immersed in a task or setting as they would if it were the real world. While seamless immersion is not currently achievable, experience shows that participants in immersive simulations easily suspend disbelief and speak and act much as they do in their real jobs. “Applications” of simulation relate the intended goals of the activity to specific target populations of participants and to specific types of simulation and curricula. ISL techniques address many gaps in the current system of training and assessment, providing focused learning experiences that cannot be readily obtained using traditional techniques or in real patient care situations. __ http://cisl.stanford.edu/resources/what_is/

Modern virtual reality can work well with realistic simulation tools for a safer and more effective immersive learning environment. If you crash the plane or kill the patient in a simulation, you can start again from the beginning, after determining what you did wrong. In addition, simulators can facilitate complex learning at an earlier age, if they are made available.

Homeschooled students can opt for “World Schooling”, or more local travel to immersive learning environments that may be available nearby. Networking with other homeschool families will increase your awareness of the local opportunities.

Summer internships, mini-apprenticeships, science & technology summer camps, and other summer opportunities assist in year-round learning while adding an element of immersion. Many summer immersive learning adventures can be enjoyed by parent and child together.

Watching television is the ultimate in passive experience, and thus largely a waste of time — except as a “priming” tool. Videogames involve more active participation, but are not always designed for constructive learning purposes. Role-playing games add a level of immersive learning to the game, and can be designed to provide relatively advanced training and thinking skills at an early age, if made realistic enough.

Finally, virtual reality and simulators can make the learning of delicate and dangerous skills safer, in the early stages. With the addition of travel immersion, mini-apprenticeships and learning adventures, and special intensive experiences such as sci/tech or music/art/dance summer camps, parents can provide a wide range of immersive opportunities for self starters.

Also remember, Dangerous Children are constantly receiving training in either pre-combat skills, or combat skills — from the early neonatal days.

DCs need to understand the world from multiple perspectives, from various distances. At a much earlier point than conventionally raised children, they will want to jump into the deeper water.

h/t:

http://singularityhub.com/2015/08/10/learning-in-an-era-of-abundant-information-and-fleeting-expertise/

Children and Firearms

Firearms are dangerous. There are roughly 3,000 deaths a year in the US from firearms for children and youth between birth and the age of 19. Most “child” homicides are among youth between 15 and 19. Next are suicides among youth between 15 and 19. There are only a relative few accidental firearms deaths in children in the US every year, around 200. And those could be prevented.

Where does most gun violence occur?

“… high rates of poverty, illicit drug trafficking and substance use all increase the risk of becoming involved in gun violence. In addition, “criminals often engage in violence as a means to acquire money, goods or other rewards.” … law-breaking criminals are the ones most responsible for gun violence, not law-abiding citizens…

… “Unintentional firearm-related deaths have steadily declined during the past century.” Accidental deaths resulting from firearms accounted for less than one percent of all unintentional fatalities in 2010.

when guns are used in self-defense the victims consistently have lower injury rates than those who are unarmed, even compared with those who used other forms of self-defense. __ Guns.com from a CDC study

All Dangerous Children develop mastery in firearms safety, maintenance, and use. But not all children will become Dangerous Children. How should parents of ordinary children approach the issue of “children and firearms?”

For young children, below the age of 7 or 8, the firearms avoidance method taught by the Eddie Eagle program of the US National Rifle Association is reasonable: Eddie and his friends teach children that if they ever come across a gun in an unsupervised situation, they need to STOP! Don’t touch. Run away. Tell a grown-up.

Eddie Eagle video

This simple approach teaches the child to be wary of firearms, to stay away from them, and to notify an adult if they see a firearm within reach. Safety training becomes more difficult if the child has been exposed to a lot of firearm violence on cartoons, television shows, movies, and video games. This is particularly true for younger children, for children with lower IQs, and for those with poor executive function.
Parents must be strict with themselves about the safe storage of firearms and ammunition (PDF). The safest firearm is one that is unloaded and stored safely out of the reach of everyone but authorised users. Ammunition should be stored in a safe and separate location.

Child Skills Training at Frontsight https://www.frontsight.com/courses/child-self-defense-training.asp
Child Skills Training at Frontsight
https://www.frontsight.com/courses/child-self-defense-training.asp

Famed firearms training institute Frontsight offers many training programs for youth and adults. Programs offered for children provide training in wall climbing, rope work, unarmed self defence, and firearms training. Think of it as a very expensive introduction to limited aspects of Dangerous Child training. 😉

Frequently, police or sheriff’s departments will provide firearms safety training for youth. The NRA offers several youth programs for firearms safety and training.Crickett Firearms safety resources

Laws restricting availability of firearms to the public do not appear to reduce rates of firearms violence. It is possible that a “waiting period” before purchasing handguns may slightly reduce rates of suicide by firearms, in some jurisdictions.

How was Al Fin trained? When Al Fin was 10, his father would take him out in the open range to set up targets for practise with a .22 calibre rifle, progressing from there. The training was strict and thorough, and no loaded weapons crossed the threshold into the home, after shooting sessions. No weapons — loaded or unloaded — were ever pointed toward another person. Safety on and finger off the trigger, until ready to fire. etc etc etc.

In the Dangerous Child Method, children are first trained with air rifles. When the child demonstrates proficiency and responsibility with air rifles, they can progress to low calibre firearms. Progression to larger rifles and handguns is not recommended until the youth has demonstrated years of proficiency with smaller weapons of lesser recoil — and has had a chance to grow more padding and stronger bones, joints, ligaments, and tendons.

Children under the age of 8 do not have well-developed executive functions, and children below the age of 16 are still undergoing significant brain development in regions involved in judgement and perspective. Just as importantly, most of today’s youngsters have grown up exposed to heroes who frequently shoot bad people, and have played first-person shoot-em-up computer games to exhaustion. Unfortunately, they have absorbed a lot of bad programming before they ever get their hands on a firearm. Any instructor of child firearms safety and training must keep all of that in mind.

Some scientific studies suggest that children under the age of 7 (before executive function development) may not benefit appreciably from firearms safety training (see references). It is likely that children who do not watch television, violent films, nor play violent video games, will pick up firearms safety training more readily. Unfortunately, such studies do not usually control for important variables such as prior exposure to violence, race, neighborhood type, marital status of families, level of supervision, etc.

One child may find a loaded firearm belonging to his mother’s boyfriend, and take it over to a friend’s house to show him, for playtime. In some neighborhoods kids will frequently see gang members carrying and displaying firearms, sometimes noticing the admiring glances thrown at the homies by teenaged girls. Some of the young kids will have even witnessed shootouts between rival gangs, or drive-by shootings. And sometimes the child will use a discovered firearm to even a score on his own.

The common denominators include lack of supervision, lack of positive male role models, frequent exposure to real, play, or portrayed violence, and lax control of loaded firearms by “grownups” in their immediate environments. Throw in life-long child-level intelligence levels and poor impulse control, and you have the recipe for an early start of life-long senseless violence.

Statistics for child firearm violence include accidents, suicides, and homicides — in ages up to the age of 19. Not much can be done to keep gang-bangers away from firearms, so a portion of those statistics should be seen as a given for inner cities and other ganglands of youth. For some of the others, stricter parental and adult control over firearms and ammunition would help.

The 3,385 firearms-related deaths for age group 0-19 years breaks down to:

214 unintentional
1,078 suicides
1,990 homicides
83 for which the intent could not be determined
20 due to legal intervention

Of the total firearms-related deaths:

73 were of children under five years old
416 were children 5-14 years old
2,896 were 15-19 years old

__ U Mich. Gun Safety for Kids

The above statistics are from 1999. You are welcome to guess how many of the 15-19 year old firearms deaths were gang related.

US Child Mortality Trends http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2015/04/14/theres-never-been-a-safer-time-to-be-a-kid-in-america/
US Child Mortality Trends
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2015/04/14/theres-never-been-a-safer-time-to-be-a-kid-in-america/

US child mortality rates for children of all ages are trending downward — by almost half since 1990. This is true for accidental deaths, homicides, and disease. Even child “disappearances” are down. Most child disappearances are runaways, with most of the rest due to custody disputes. Roughly one in a thousand “child disappearances” are from actual kidnapping by strangers.

Firearm violence, violence against children, and violence in general tend to concentrate in particular places. You may not realise, for example, that:

Blacks are seven times as likely as people of other races to commit murder, eight times more likely to commit robbery and three times more likely to use a gun in a crime. __ Patrick Buchanan on The Color of Crime

Besides the close supervisions of firearms and ammunition in the home, the next best preventative against being injured or killed by firearms may be knowing which countries and which parts of cities to avoid.

Global Homicide Rates
Global Homicide Rates

Violence — by firearms or other means — tends to cluster in particular populations and regions. This is partly due to genetics, and partly due to culture.

Whenever you travel outside your own neighborhood, it is important to understand where and by whom violence is likely to erupt. Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst. Sooner rather than later.