Self Confidence and Self Efficacy

The two traits of self-efficacy and self confidence are both useful, and come naturally to the Dangerous Child due to his training and experience.

Self Efficacy

Albert Bandura is arguably the most cited author on the subject of self-efficacy, and he defines self-efficacy as an individual’s beliefs about their capacity to influence the events in their own lives (Bandura, 1977). __ https://positivepsychology.com/self-confidence/

Self-efficacy is closely related to one type of self confidence — confidence in one’s ability to deal with situations as they arise:

… Psychology Dictionary Online defines self-confidence as an individual’s trust in his or her own abilities, capacities, and judgments, or belief that he or she can successfully face day to day challenges and demands (Psychology Dictionary Online).

… Typically, when you are confident in your abilities you are happier due to your successes. When you are feeling better about your capabilities, the more energized and motivated you are to take action and achieve your goals.

Self-confidence, then, is similar to self-efficacy in that it tends to focus on the individual’s future performance; however, it seems to be based on prior performance, and so in a sense, it also focuses on the past. __ https://positivepsychology.com/self-confidence/

People tend to enjoy doing things that they are good at. If a person is good at solving puzzles and problems — of whatever type — they will have more confidence and enthusiasm when faced with new puzzles and problems.

Ways to Build Confidence

  • Get Things Done
  • Do The Right Thing
  • Follow Through
  • Think Long-term
  • Don’t Care What Others Think
  • More here

The way to build confidence is clearly to succeed at getting things done, over and over again. It is particularly useful in this regard to get meaningful things done — things that you can take pride in. It is also helpful if one is guided by his own inner compass rather than by outside opinion. Overcoming failure is just part of the experience of gaining confidence through getting things done.

Here are a few attributes of confident people:

  • They don’t seek attention
  • They don’t make excuses
  • They don’t avoid conflict
  • They aren’t afraid to make decisions
  • They seek feedback for informational purposes
  • They are not afraid of failure
  • They don’t ruminate on negative thoughts
  • They don’t broadcast negative energy outward
  • They focus on the task, not on themselves
  • They deal with criticism then move on
  • They know when to take action and do so without asking permission

More

As in self-efficacy, meaningful self confidence comes from proving oneself competent to solve problems and to achieve things that are often thought difficult. Think of it as a “habit of competent achievement.”

When this type of competence is combined with an unconventional vision and genius, we often find persons who are sources of disruptive innovation and change. True disruptive geniuses are rare. Either they arrive on the scene too early (Leonardo da Vinci), or they have a character flaw that limits their scope of vision, or they get caught up in the social milieu of the times and fail to step far enough out of the mainstream.

We are living in a time of hyper-conformity, when most of the public believes that “consensus” is more important than verifiability, accuracy, falsifiability, or precision in science. In truth, consensus is the shite of science, but how are the people to know this in this age of group mind?

And so it should be clear that this world needs a variety of youth movements that lead the young to think independently from the crowd, to immerse themselves in the deep science of pattern, movement, language, and the passions of humanity — past, present, and future. Movements such as the Dangerous Child movement, where youth are financially independent several different ways by the age of 18. Where youth are not intimidated by the appeal to authority or to the majority opinion. Where youth are not swayed by emotional arguments based upon any type of consensus at all — without having worked their way through the arguments and the evidence themselves.

To have a confident future we must have confident youth and young adults with the intelligence, creativity, and hands-on skills to see things through.

Avoiding a Society of “Passionate Failure”

Mike Rowe via Legal Insurrection 6/16

Are children born with fixed passions and interests so that all they need to do is to find them — or do they need to build and develop their passions with the application of effort? How a child approaches this question will make all the difference in his future.

Fixed Interest Mindset vs. Growth/Evolved Interest Mindset

Across North America, children and youth are being taught to “find their passion.” It is presumed “the passions” are fixed and built in, and that after one’s passion is found that everything meaningful will come effortlessly in an endless stream of motivation and fulfillment.

Researchers at Stanford and Yale recently looked at the different consequences for children when they believed that their interests are “fixed” and only needed to be discovered, and when the child believed that he must work to develop his passions and put in continuous effort to follow them meaningfully.

In a paper that is forthcoming in Psychological Science, the authors delineate the difference between the two mind-sets. One is a “fixed theory of interests”—the idea that core interests are there from birth, just waiting to be discovered—and the other is a “growth theory,” the idea that interests are something anyone can cultivate over time.

… “If passions are things found fully formed, and your job is to look around the world for your passion—it’s a crazy thought,” Walton told me. “It doesn’t reflect the way I or my students experience school, where you go to a class and have a lecture or a conversation, and you think, That’s interesting. It’s through a process of investment and development that you develop an abiding passion in a field.”

Another reason not to buy into the fixed theory is that it can cause people to give up too easily. If something becomes difficult, it’s easy to assume that it simply must not have been your passion, after all. In one portion of this study, the students who thought interests were fixed were also less likely to think that pursuing a passion would be difficult at times. Instead, they thought it would provide “endless motivation.” __ The Atlantic

Modern educators like to believe that once a child’s passions are found and engaged, that he will subsequently benefit from an endless stream of insight and energy that will allow him to follow the passions to their proper rewards.

This belief in “the fixed passions” is compatible with modern theories of “self esteem” and the abolition of grades, competence hierarchies, and meaningful competition. In this brave new world there is no need to stratify ideas and theories by how well they work in the real world. Every culture is perfect just as it is, everybody gets a trophy, and if science finds differences in aptitudes and achievements between different groups, then by popular proclamation science must be wrong about that.

The “follow your fixed passion” is also compatible with $1.5 trillion in student loan debt in US colleges — much of which will never be repaid. It is also compatible with a rapidly expanding skills shortage in North America and Europe which — like it or not — will result in having to choose between importing skilled workers from abroad, or a gradual scaling back of local skilled services and industries, leading to increased imports of products from abroad.

How to cultivate a “growth” mind-set in the young, future-psychology-experiment subjects of America? If you’re a parent, you can avoid dropping new hobbies as soon as they become difficult. (Your kids might take note if you do, O’Keefe said.) __ Atlantic

The author of the Atlantic piece excerpted above makes a great point: Your example teaches your child far more about how to approach life than anything you may say to him.

And stop telling your child “you’re so smart!” Children who are told how smart they are will tend to begin avoiding difficult challenges so as not to threaten their “so smart!” self-concept. Instead, praise the child’s effort and work ethic.

The underlying idea here is to teach the child — by example, through story/myth, and by reinforced advice — how to embrace and overcome difficult challenges. This is necessary in order for the child to reach levels of accomplishment that will allow him to both build and discover meaningful and purposeful “passions.”

Without this built-in love of overcoming challenge and solving difficult problems, life becomes one series of dumbed down “educational experiences” after another.

And that is exactly the opposite of what you want for your Dangerous Child.

Rebuilding the US Schools System Can Save Some of the Children

The US Government School System is Designed to Ruin Young Lives

But if some of the fatal bureaucracy can be dismantled long enough to insert some opportunity-boosting knowledge systems in place of the mind-destroying indoctrination centres, at least a few islands of competence may well spring up in unexpected places.

We have already looked at the exceptional US Basis Charter School system, whose students often test higher than students in the vaunted school systems of Singapore, Korea, Germany, and Shanghai. Today we will look at charter schools that build real-world skills that are immediately applicable in the workplace.

Utica Shale Academy Source
Utica Shale Academy
Source

The Utica Shale Academy provides a unique and vigorous learning environment through a specialized academic program which responds to employers’ and industries’ current and emerging and changing global workforce needs and expectations through business/school partnerships.

The school’s overall goal is for students to develop work habits that foster independence, self-awareness, and commitment to personal growth, as well as achieve competency in industry and academic standards. USA’s mission statement is backed by their oil and gas industry centered curriculum. The following is an example of a course in the program:

Introduction to Well Control. This self-paced interactive multimedia program takes a rig hand through the basic concepts of well control in an easy to understand, straight-forward manner. Course objectives include: Well Control Equipment, Units of Measure, Hydrostatic Pressure, Pressure Balance, Causes of Kicks, Controlling the Well, and Restoring the Well.

Other sample courses, each with unique objectives, are:

IADC Rig Pass: A basic orientation of rig operations and safe work practices. (IADC RigPass certificate available).

Introduction to Petroleum Industry DIT: This course is designed for individuals that are interested in a comprehensive understanding of the upstream and downstream operations of the petroleum industry.

Introduction to Petroleum Industry DIT Drilling Focus: This course is designed for individuals that are interested in a comprehensive understanding of the upstream operations of the petroleum industry with a focus on drilling.

Introduction to Petroleum Industry DIT Production Focus: This course is designed for individuals that are interested in a comprehensive understanding of the downstream operations of the petroleum industry with a focus on production.

USA students graduate with a high school diploma, but the school’s specialized and other related courses lead students to a number of certifications necessary to enter the oil and gas marketplace. The photo at the top of the article shows USA students visiting a well site.

USA opened its doors in 2014 with an initial enrollment of 43 students; by its second year, 71 students had enrolled. The oil and gas industry is taking note of USA’s program, which was recently recognized by the trade publication, Pipelines Connection Magazine. More information on the Utica Shale Academy can be found on its website.

Another Ohio charter school, the Ohio Valley Energy Technology Academy (OVETA) in Jefferson County, is a year younger than USA, but has a similar education program tied to the oil and gas industry. In its 2015-2016 annual report, OVETA explains how it meets its educational challenges:

The structure of OVETA is very student driven and provides a blended learning atmosphere that incorporates core courses with added education to prepare students for the workforce…. Students punch a time clock and learn the importance of knowing and keeping a schedule just like on a job site.

OVETA held its first graduation ceremony in May 2016, when five seniors were awarded diplomas.

__ Source

Practical Skills Training Prepares Youth for Immediate Substantive Income

Most US youth are subjected to a “college prep” curriculum, although only roughly 25% of them are suited for a rigorous 4 year college degree. We have revealed how well trained, competent 18 year old welders can make well over $100,000 a year from his 18th birthday onward. But welding is only one of the much-in-demand skills which do not require an expensive 4-year college degree, and which pay a high enough salary for a smart youth to begin investing for the future in earnest, from a relatively young age. Contrast such a positive start to adult life with the more common decades of debt that confront the average youth who attempts to complete a (worthless) 4 year degree for which he is not suited.

This Type of Program Should be the Rule, Not the Exception:

Source
Source

Jason Gresham has been shaping the lives and careers of high school students in DeSoto County for 15 years. Gresham averages between 30 and 40 high school students every school year. The students range in age from 16 to 18, with the majority of his class members either juniors or seniors looking for a career in industry-rich Mississippi.

He teaches the basics, starting students with stick welding and cutting torches because he believes a good foundation is the start to a career in welding. As the semester continues, the students progress into MIG and then TIG processes.

But in today’s multi-faceted world, his class does not end with welding alone. To ensure his students are sought-after prospects in the real world, Gresham’s high school class is a revamped collection of disciplines that include machine shop, sheet metal work and welding.

“We focus on these high school students to give them a real sense for what type of skills are marketable, what they must have in the workplace,” says Gresham. “Metal fabrication calls for more than one skill today, unlike what it used to be. We teach these kids how to do it all inside the Career Tech Center Metal Fabrication shop.” __ Source

Young people need to be given a foundation of competence as they set out to live their lives, not a foundation of debt and indoctrination. Government schools in the US destroy more lives than they help. This tragedy results from a corrupt ideological system of educational bureaucracy that has been badly in need of overhaul for the past 55 years. Perhaps a President Trump can “drain the swamp,” kill the bureaucratic zombies and lobbyists of DC, and begin to build a system that instills competence and earned confidence.

That would be a refreshing change.

In the US Big Government is the Problem; Dangerous Children are the Solution

Crony Corruption and Its Enemies Image Source
Crony Corruption and Its Enemies
Image Source

And now we have Trump. He was elected to drain the swamp. He may be our last hope to tip the Big Club over a cliff. __ Canadian Radical Press

Big Government Stifles Opportunity and Destroys the Future

The fear of big government is near a record high in the US, despite the election of populist presidential candidate Donald Trump.

As businessman Donald Trump prepares to become the nation’s 45th president, Americans continue to express more concern about the threat big government poses to the U.S. than big business or big labor. Two in three Americans (67%) identify big government as the country’s biggest threat. That is below the record high of 72% in 2013 but still on the higher end of the range since the mid-1960s. __ Mish

Big government siphons capital and talent out of the innovative and productive sectors into the stagnant quagmire of corrupt rent-seeking. This can only create long-term decay from massive debt and a decline of demographic quality — which is exactly what the US has been seeing under the Bush-Clinton-Bush-Obama cabal.

After many years of living under an overbearing nanny government system, populations become dependent — with many of their natural competencies atrophying and diminishing to mere vestiges. Eventually, these lifelong adolescents cannot live without the things big government supplies them.

Dangerous Children Can Live Without Big Government

From the earliest age, Dangerous Children are exposed to situations and environments which help them build their natural competencies. Beginning with the most basic and fundamental of skills, then branching into more sophisticated and powerful capacities to act, Dangerous Children learn to make their way in a world of their own devising.

Here are a Few Basic Skills Dangerous Children Must Learn Before the Age of 15 Years:

Some of the skills below involve interacting with other people, and others involve the mastery of the self. These are basic skills which must be mastered before the final three years of formal Dangerous Child training, which prepare youth for financial, intellectual, and emotional independence.

1. How to tell the truth

Be honest about your own mistakes and learn from them.

2. How to receive criticism

Accept criticism from your mentors humbly, even when you may feel there are mitigating circumstances. Grow beyond the defensive stage where you feel you must justify sub-par performance.

3. How to break the ice in unfamiliar situations

When asking “open-ended questions,” make sure not to be patronising or to feign simple-mindedness. Think first. Know when to be direct and when to take a more roundabout approach.

4. How to ask for something you want

If you don’t muster up the courage to request an opportunity, special training, or a spot on an expedition, you have no chance of getting it.

“The more you put yourself in uncomfortable situations, the more likely you’ll decide they’re not that uncomfortable after all.”

5. How to keep your promises

Maybe you told a friend you’d show up to his birthday party, or maybe you agreed to finish an extra assignment for your coach/mentor. Whatever the situation, you should make good on your word.

“Break [your promise] and people lose trust and faith in you, which, over time, is very hard to mend,” Hoffman says.

6. How to communicate effectively

No matter your career field is to be, you can always improve the way you speak and write.

“Think about ways to challenge yourself and tweak how you write an email or behave in a meeting,” the anonymous user suggests.

Here’s an example: “During your next team meeting, resist talking about your idea or opinion right off the bat. Instead, count to five, and if you still feel like you have something relevant to contribute, speak up. On the flip side, if you’re shy, challenge yourself to say what you’re thinking, instead of remaining silent.”

7. How to be resilient

The rest of your life is bound to include setbacks, sadness, and frustration (in addition to joy and excitement!). Carolyn Cho says you should use your early adulthood to figure out how to recover from mishaps:

9. How to live within your means

Youth and young adults must think carefully about all their expenditures:

“Luxuries are a wonderful thing only if you can truly afford them. Don’t be a slave to funding a lifestyle that will not last. Learn to live modestly and save up, and then you will have earned the right to purchase yourself some treats, in moderation.”
10. How to deal with rejection

Life is full of challenges. Not every venture will work out. The only way to avoid rejection is to avoid risk, and that is not an option for Dangerous Children.

11. How to learn without a textbook

Studying shouldn’t be limited to your time in school. It “can be anywhere, anytime, and with anyone,” writes Lenny Kho. “Keep your mind wide open.”

You should always be seeking out new ways to expand your mind. Read books, practice speaking foreign languages, or take music lessons — whatever excites you most.
12. How to accept the possibility of change

Research by psychologist Dan Gilbert suggests that we have a hard time imagining how much we’ll change in the future.

So it makes sense that Choi says, “It’s near impossible to plan where you’ll be a few years from now.”

Choi uses his own trajectory as an example. During college he studied engineering, and he never imagined he’d move to rural Eastern Europe to harvest corn afterward — but he did. While living in Europe, he never thought he’d later move to a fancy building in New York City — but that’s exactly what happened.

Expect to be surprised by the future.

13. How to make a decision

Pretend somone’s holding a gun up to your head and giving you 15 seconds to make a decision. You’ll definitely be able to choose something — and it will release a lot of pressure.
14. How to sell yourself

This skill isn’t just for professional salespeople.

“Being able to sell yourself to others is a vital skill in any area of life,” writes Lukas Schwekendiek. “In the working business you have to sell yourself to clients and potential employers. In finding a partner you must sell yourself to the person and your potential benefit to their life.”

Try telling a story about yourself, since it will be easier for people to remember. And make sure that story sparks conversation among your listeners.
15. How to negotiate

One strategy is getting people to say “no” when you want them to ultimately say “yes.” For example, when you’re negotiating the terms of a job and not getting your way, you can ask the hiring manager, “Do you want me to fail?” The answer is, obviously, no — and from there, you can start pushing for what you need.
16. How to listen without speaking

M. Malhan writes: ‘By training yourself to be a better and ACTIVE LISTENER, you will be able to communicate more effectively and develop better relationships in life.”

As Dave Kerpen, CEO of Likeable Local, previously told Business Insider, listening is the most important — and most underrated skill — in business and in life.

If you want to develop your own active listening skills, try “mindful conversation.” Two people pair up and one person speaks for a set time period while the other is completely silent. Then, the second person reflects on what the first person said until the first person feels satisfied. Finally, the two people switch roles.

The goal of mindful conversation is to have less superficial interactions, to instead have interactions that leave you feeling like you and your conversation partner really understood each other.
17. How to be patient

Take a tip from Steve Kobrin: “Good things simply do not happen overnight. They take time to nurture and cultivate. They take a lot of work. A lot of thought. A lot of trial and error, and learning from your mistakes.”

__ Adapted and paraphrased from Source

Note that the article excerpted and paraphrased above was written for young adults in their 20s. But as we never tire of saying, if you wait until a person is a young adult before teaching them to be generally and broadly competent, you have waited too late. Instead of a competent society, you will harvest a society of perpetual adolescents, psychological neotenates, academic lobotomates, and a general mass of people eternally lost at sea.

And with that kind of population, the best kind of government you can ever hope for is a corrupt and stifling nanny state, that will eventually collapse of its own incompetence — in other words, something like what the US was rapidly becoming under Obama, and would certainly have become under Ms. Hillary P. Clinton.

Hope for the best. Prepare for the worst. It is never too late to have a Dangerous Childhood.