Art of Fighting: Avoidance

Being in Control of Oneself While Being Aware of One’s Surroundings

Avoidance is being aware, understanding the enemy, understanding yourself and understanding your environment. If you are training in a martial art, then avoidance is understanding that art and whether it will stand up to the threat of a real encounter. More than anything, avoidance is having enough control over yourself, your ego, your pride, peer pressure, morality etc. to stop these negative emotions from dragging you into a situation that could otherwise be avoided. __ http://www.aikidoguro.us/fighting/avoidance.html

If you can avoid areas known to be rife with conflicted individuals, that is generally best. Avoid high crime neighborhoods and cities, and gatherings of people where there is a high potential for violent encounters. Even when in relatively “safe areas,” maintain a reasonable level of awareness.

Jeff Cooper Alertness Codes
Jeff Cooper Alertness Codes

Taken from: The Art of Fighting Without Fighting

When Trouble Finds You

Sometimes it is not possible to entirely avoid conflict. Even so, one should learn how to avoid violence within a conflict situation, if at all possible. When you become aware that a conflict is developing, be prepared to move to a place where you have more control of the situation.

Escape can mean as little as swallowing your pride or controlling your ego, taking your lady by the arm and moving to a place where your company is appreciated. If you are like me, have a little drink at home or go to a nice restaurant thus avoiding the potential all together and stopping you having to look over your shoulder every five minutes to see who is staring at you. If you find this difficult, if for some reason you are stuck in a particular place for the evening and a guy gives you the evil eye, lift your hand up and give the fellow a polite wave. The chances are that he will think that he knows you from somewhere and feel embarrassed that he has stared, he might even wave back. Once you have made the wave do not hold eye contact, this is often seen as a subliminal challenge. __ http://www.aikidoguro.us/fighting/escape.html

When trouble has found you, and it is not possible to move away from it, sometimes one can decompress the situation with the right words and body language. Or, perhaps, one can stall for time while looking for a way out.

When avoidance is gone and escape is no longer possible we are left with verbal dissuasion. Verbal dissuasion means talking the situation down… Therefore, as soon as you are approached in a potentially confrontational situation take up a small forty five degree stance (as illustrated) by moving your right (or left) leg inconspicuously behind you. Simultaneously splay your arms (fence), as though in exclamation, whilst replying with your dialogue. The lead hand is placed between you and the assailant, the reverse hand back, ready to control or attack…

… For the duration of dialogue it is imperative to maintain distance control until you are able to escape, or are forced or strike. If you are forced into an attack situation -this should be an absolute last resort -make it a telling blow to a vulnerable area. Explode into the opponent with every fibre of your being, then run!! __ http://www.aikidoguro.us/fighting/verbal_dissuasion.html

Being aware of your surroundings and avoiding the bad areas is only part of the challenge: You must also know how the bad guys think, and how they go about stalking and attacking their victims.

If you know how the bad guys work it stands to reason that you can avoid him like the plague. These people mainly rely on deception, not so easy now that you know how the blighters work. Avoid at all costs, escape as soon as you see their ritual in play, if that doesn’t work, or the option has been spent .then use verbal dissuasion.
__ http://www.aikidoguro.us/fighting/returning_the_verbal_challenge.html

But in reality, bad guys are not restricted to bad areas. They can stalk deeply into your community and into your neighborhood and even inside your very home.

Dangerous Children are taught to keep a part of their minds awake and ready, even while attending to other things, even in reasonably safe environments. Such readiness allows them to move into a necessary response phase more quickly and automatically.

Competence-Based Confidence Makes Choosing Avoidance Easier

Combat flow training and “attack-proofing” allow trainees to become accustomed to the feel of ongoing physical contact, and helps to move them beyond the sometimes paralytic fear of physical conflict. Mastering such fears should allow a person to more easily choose avoidance, evasion, escape, and verbal dissuasion — even when he might easily put the aggressor down quickly and (perhaps) relatively easily.

Benefits… :
1. You don’t waste training time memorizing a million moves
2. You can improvise any strike to any target when you need it with full power
3. Hit harder at close range without telegraphing or winding up
4. Fight on the ground against multiple attackers without wrestling
5. Develop hyper-balance plus the ability to control your attacker’s balance
6. Develop a liquid body that eludes blows, locks and grappling
7. Feel what your attacker’s doing before he does it
8. Adapt to both changing attacks and changing defenses
9. Train deadly striking and dirty fighting all the time
10. Train defenses against both

There is nothing like getting hit to clear the cobwebs from your nervous system, at least if you have incorporated dynamic contact into your training. By placing improvisation into the middle of your training, you are not as likely to be surprised by less conventional attacks.

Amusing Afternote:

Once there was an app called “Sketch Factor” which was meant to alert newcomers to “sketchy” areas of town that they may wish to avoid. It was based upon user reports, and displayed red bubbles on neighborhood maps where suspected trouble spots existed. After being labeled “racist” ad nauseum, the app died a slow and ignominious death. The new app by the developers is called “Walc.” It is meant as a safe walking guide for cities, to keep walkers from wandering off their intended path.

Clearly there is a need for websites, apps, and services that help to acquaint travelers, visitors, tourists, and newcomers with unfamiliar territory — to keep them out of trouble. Just as clearly, powerful interests in media, the activist community, and the rabble-rousing peanut gallery in general, wish to prevent such useful information from becoming common knowledge — even if innocents suffer as a result. Political correctness and ideological purity are obstacles to living long healthy lives in some situations.

Corrupt influence peddlers and information gatekeepers in government, media, academia, and other cultural institutions want to keep people in the dark just because they can. We’re gonna need a lot more guillotines! 😉

What Happens to Children Who Are Not Taught to Look After Themselves?

Awareness and Control
If a child has never learned to look out for herself, she is likely to find herself at the mercy of Muslim rape gangs, violent bullies, and all types of other predators.

In the short video clip to the left, we see a teenage girl walking through a veritable minefield, seemingly unaware of her predicament. Instead of moving away from the blow, she actually walks right into it! Then she proceeds to turn an oblivious back to further attacks! Whatever are they teaching children in schools these days? Very little that they need to know, apparently.

Dangerous Children learn to be “attack-proof.” Attack-proofing is a method of combined situational awareness and self-preservation. Here is a YouTube clip providing a few examples:



More video clips
Attack Proof Home

Attack-proofing school provides a full range of skills, including how to avoid the attack in the first place through awareness and maintaining a safe distance from attackers.

The “American Combato” system is another good system for Dangerous Children.

The main idea is to avoid and escape potential attacks. But if a Dangerous Child is caught in the middle of an attack that she cannot quickly escape, she should know how to control the situation as best she can, until an opening for escape reveals itself.

Too many modern children are like the girl in the top video clip: at the mercy of any predator who comes along.

Who is to blame? Obviously our entire politically correct culture is to blame, which denies the very real threats that are faced by young and old alike. Mainstream media, academia, governments at all levels, and popular culture are all oriented toward denying the threats which anyone with eyes can see.

A Dangerous Child is the mildest of the mild as long as allowed to go their own way. Would-be bullies, rapists, and “knock-out artists” will receive an unexpected surprise: Dangerous Children start out dangerous, and become more so the longer they live.

If you value political correctness more than your lives and the lives of your loved ones, simply accept things as they are. Otherwise, consider going Dangerous.

It is never too late to have a Dangerous Childhood. But the sooner you begin, the better for everyone.

Making Your Sons and Daughters Strong and Independent

No one wants their daughters to be victims of gang rape / beating, or their sons to be bullied and beaten by thugs of any culture. No one wishes a lifetime of drug addiction or cult conformity for their children. Unfortunately, children and teens in Europe and the Anglosphere are at higher risk of abuse by gangs, cults, and extremists — because the internal habits that allow children and youth to reject harmful conformity and victimisation, were never cultivated.

Just how do you keep your sons from converting to fanatical Islam and marching off to be a suicide bomber? How do you prevent your daughters from becoming sex slaves to muslim predators or other rape gangs? Even more relevant, how do you make sure your children grow strong and independent, without sliding into a meaningless life filled with nothing more than empty diversions? More on the superfluous life.

Children do not fall into destructive patterns of belief, behaviour, and co-dependency unless they have never been given the means to construct their own strong internal frame of personal character and independent choice. Good habits of thinking and acting will tend to last a lifetime, once they are instilled and properly reinforced — particularly if the child becomes a youth with a wide range of competent skills and occupational choices.

Below is a list of useful habitual behaviours which will stand a child in good stead as he grows older:
Habits of Mind

http://www.chsvt.org/wdp/Habits_of_Mind.pdf%5B/caption%5D
More

Good habits cannot be forced from outside. They must be learned by the child at the proper time, when his nervous system has developed far enough to learn the particular beneficial habit.

Remember: The teacher does not teach. Instead, the learner learns. If the learner’s mind is not structured and ready to learn the concept for the day, it will not matter how well the teacher has prepared his lesson.

The learning mind must be “empowered” from the earliest age, and continuously reinforced — until it is the child himself who is doing the reinforcing. This self-reinforcement occurs at different ages for different children — even under the most ideal conditions. Young Mozart, for example, required much less external reinforcement to achieve a given level of mastery than did young Salieri.
__ Original Al Fin blog

If a child’s mind has learned to work along positive and productive pathways — in his natural way and in the form of play, at least in the beginning — his mind is resistant to obviously destructive outside suggestions.

In other words, don’t allow your child to grow up with a gaping void between his ears. Help him to grow a strong, functional, goal-seeking mind — a mind that is truly his own. And give him a range and depth of skills and competence that allow him to move boldly confidently through the obstacle courses and minefields of dysfunctional modern societies.

The Dangerous Child curriculum begins at birth and never fully completes. While Dangerous Children are expected to master at least three different ways of supporting themselves financially by the age of 18, a Dangerous Child never stops learning new skills.

Dangerous Child: Basic Self-Defence

When is the best time to begin training a child to defend himself and his loved ones? Before he is born. But for now we will focus on when and how children should be trained to be ready for combat, when the real world crashes through their bubble of protection.

Here are a few viewpoints on the question of combat training for children:

How early is too early? My answer is, if they can walk, they’re ready. My 2 year old loves tumbling and climbing games. If I’m dancing to some music, he’ll come and join me. If he can squeeze his way in, he’ll help push the wheel barrow every time. When we go for walks, he likes to walk the tops of the paving stones that line sidewalks in some yards. By encouraging these he’s learning a lot about balance and how to control movement. Fitness and combat training are habits, just like work ethic and decency, your kids will follow how you lead. …

Training with children should be focused on the basics. General flexibility, stamina, healthy habits, and proper form for things like body weight exercises, and self defense. …

I’ll recommend you wait until the child in question is responsible enough for a weapon, be it knife or gun or bow. Then introduce them to the weapon under supervision to ensure they know how to safely carry and deploy it. My dad is a hunter, so we always knew the basic rules of gun safety, he would even bring us with him if he was headed out to shoot some clays. _Calamity Jane

Jane brings up an interesting point: Each child is different, and will reveal his readiness for more advanced weapons training in his own time. It is the parent’s and trainer’s responsibility to pay attention to what the child reveals.

The kids in Krav Maga classes learn about two-handed chokeholds, going for the eyes and how to cause the most damage with a hit to the face. Why do elementary school kids need these skills?

To use on strangers of course. The dangerous kind, that might pop out from behind any given shrubbery and attack you.

Teachers stress that the kids should never use these skills unless they are being attacked by a stranger. _Babble

Krav Maga is a pared-down method of martial arts/ personal combat similar to “attack-proofing,” which is similar to the Bradley Steiner system. Take martial arts, remove the ceremony, and keep only what is effective on the street.

The media never tires of telling us that our children are at risk. But the very thought of teaching our children to be dangerous enough to both avoid threats and to deal with unanticipated threats, gives mainstream intellectuals a horrific case of the heebie jeebies.

Modern children are typically pampered and sheltered from most of the harsher realities of life. This is a relatively good thing for infants, toddlers, and most kindergartners. But as a child grows older and more independent, he will spend more and more of his time outside of direct adult supervision. If he does not learn to develop situational awareness and how to protect himself as he gets older, he becomes a sitting duck for bullies, predators, spontaneous flash bashes, and accidentally stumbling into other bad situations.

Besides Krav Maga, what are some of the best martial arts to teach young children?  In our opinion, Aikido, Judo, Jiu Jitsu, wrestling, and fencing. Here are a few ideas for teaching martial arts to children:

Aikido:

I think if I were to teach a class of kids aikido, here’s some of what I’d do to avoid chokes, joint locks, and etc…Mobility games
Ukemi – lots and lots of ukemi [ed: the art of falling safely and smoothly]
Walking kata
Evasion drills with partners
Brush-off and escape
Wrist releases

Cool ki tricks (mind games, concentration, etc…)
Talk about how to deal with interpersonal conflict
Situational self defense

So, there’s still a lot of aikido and pre-aikido that we could do. Much of the pre-aikido stuff is identical to the pre-judo stuff we do in kiddie judo. _Aikido for kids

Judo:

For a while, young kids should play a games-based judo approach. Fun preparations that build strength and coordination and familiarity with judo. But then at some point they have to move to “real judo.” I’m not talking about adult judo – we start kids in regular adult classes at about age 13, depending on their physical size and maturity. I’m talking about an intermediate level between games-based judo and actual judo technique.

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One indicator that they are ready to step it up a level from games to real judo, is that they understand and can abide by the gentleman’s agreement at the heart of judo. I’ve mentioned this Judo gentleman’s rule before.

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The most central rule to judo practice is that if I am going to allow you to use my body to learn to throw hard and fast then you must save me at the end. You can throw with force, but you must support me and help me get into the proper landing position.
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Without people abiding by this rule, judo falls apart and cannot be practiced. When kids are progressively demonstrating that they can take better and better care of their ukes, they can be taught progressively more vigorous judo. _Judo for kids

Jiu Jitsu:

After teaching my own children and many others basic self-defense, I realized that children should first concentrate on a safe foundation system of self-defense based solely on Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. Only given solid aptitude of this system, at an intermediate level, would I then teach the striking techniques of Thai Boxing. The rationale for this is manifold:

Only a more advanced student will learn techniques that are inherently more dangerous (striking). This way, I will assure that only children who are mature enough to understand the safety issues will learn the technique.
In a fight, position is more important than pure striking ability. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu gives a greater ability to control the position of your opponent than Thai Boxing. So, I want the student to know how to control their opponent long before they learn how to punch, elbow, or kick them. With positional control, punching and kicking can happen with relative leisure!
Beginners may get confused if they have too many techniques to focus on. After they have the fundamentals of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu “wired in,” they won’t get their mind as cluttered with dramatically different techniques of Thai Boxing.

Core Concepts

Safety first.
Understand the difference between causing pain and causing harm. Never attempt to harm a fellow student.
Avoid physical conflict.
Work out conflict with words. If you can escape a situation without physical harm to you or a family member, don’t fight.
Words are never a reason to fight. Children are rewarded for avoiding fights.
Because of legal and school disciplinary issues involved in fights, the children are taught that in a situation where a fight is unavoidable, the words spoken and attempts made to dispel and avoid the situation beforehand can make a great difference.
Challenge the student to work hard.
The only true rewards in life come from hard work, dedication, and consistent practice.
Fitness through aerobic conditioning
Self defense in realistic situations
Have fun, but be serious enough to make solid progress every class!
Share techniques and learning with fellow students only.
It is important that they understand that this is a fighting system that should not be casually shared or demonstrated anywhere but in class with the instructor, unless self-defense calls for it. In other words, it would be very bad if they demonstrated a choke on a friend at the playground or kicked the family dog!
Don’t advertise yourself as a martial arts expert! Many children take a few classes and think they are Bruce Lee reincarnated. A bigger bully will go out of his way to pick a fight with someone like this. Sun Tsu said, “All warfare is based on deception.” Don’t let them know what you know. More importantly, as a beginner, you don’t know much, so don’t pretend to know more than you do! _Jiu Jitsu for kids

Wrestling:

Find a TeamDepending on your child’s age, there are several different options for the types of teams you want to sign him up with. The most popular choice for parents with children under the age of 10 is to start them in a freestyle/Greco-Roman wrestling club. These clubs typically practice folkstyle, the same style of wrestling contested in high schools and colleges across the United States.

Wrestling clubs are typically not affiliated with any specific school or organization. Rather, they are private organizations geared towards teaching children the sport of wrestling. However, many clubs may practice at a school and have the same coaching staff as a school’s regular team — but the club will not be related to the school in any other way.

Essentially, you want to look for a team that focuses on fitness and technical development, rather than competition. This is especially important for younger wrestlers. For more information on what to look for when choosing a wrestling club, check out iSport’s guide, _Wrestling for kids

Wrestling has traditionally been a male sport, but it is becoming more popular among females. It can be extremely strenuous, so children should have good health and fitness levels before beginning training. Most of all, choose a coach who is skilled, patient, a good teacher, and emotionally mature.

Martial arts training for children can be useful for many reasons, but the training needs to be age appropriate, and geared to the individual child’s needs and maturity level. Basic training to develop respect for instructors and classmates as well as disciplined habits of practise, should precede more difficult and complex skills training. Early training should focus on fitness, mobility, escape, releases, balance, situational awareness and response, and the mental aspects of physical training and confrontation.

Fencing for Children:

Dominion Fencing (my club) has experimented with programs for very young children…. We found that what worked best was a program of running, jumping, “gross motor skills” games, and playing games with foam swords. In short, we were charging parents to do what any kid is going to do on a playground when left to their own devices. I would be surprised if any club accepting children below the age of 8 is doing anything much different than we were.

To actually learn fencing as a sport takes a considerable amount of motor coordination, higher level reasoning functions, and the ability to understand some complex rules (rules many adults don’t ever understand) — which is why every expert in the field usually recommends taking up fencing between the ages of 8 and 10. _Fencing.net (forum)

Fencers learn good sportsmanship, self-discipline, gain quick reflexes and how to compete independently. They gain a sense of accomplishment when winning and learn to profit from their defeats. They learn to make complex decisions, analyze problems, and think fast on their feet. These ideals help children reach their potential in many areas other than fencing.

• They are active and doing something, not being
passive receptacles for programming beamed out from
the TV.

• Fencing helps children get fit – you can’t “sword fight”
without a good bit of movement!

• Educators are discovering that fencing can enhance
mathematical performance.

• Fencing helps children learn to pay attention and to
develop their decision-making abilities.

• Fencing helps people with ADD and ADHD to focus.

• Because fencing is an individual sport, the fencer is
solely responsible for their success or failure, which
becomes a great lesson in responsibility. _Swordsmen101

Martial arts skills should be introduced in a graded fashion, as appropriate for the child’s age, level of physical and emotional maturity, and the ability of the child to progress and integrate new skills into the total skills set.

Most training in strikes, kicks, weapons, choke holds, joint locks, etc. should be withheld until the child is mature enough to learn and practise them with proper restraint and respect for classmates and instructors. This should usually only occur after significant time (years) in training, under close observation, and only with other students who are prepared for such training.

Every dangerous child should be able to sense potentially dangerous situations and avoid them when possible. But he should also be physically and mentally prepared to deal with situations which occur outside of his ability to predict or prevent.

Dangerous children are by definition not helpless. This should be true physically, mentally, emotionally, and in virtually every aspect of his life.

So ideally, martial arts training will be just one aspect of a dangerous child‘s training in not being helpless. This is a different attitude toward child raising than one typically finds, but it is necessary.

All aspects of childhood learning begin with play. Learning to fight is no exception. Begin early, with play fighting and wrestling on soft surfaces. Older children who are emotionally mature and competent in basic fighting skills make excellent instructors for children just learning the more disciplined forms of mock combat.

For grownups who want to learn situational awareness and various combat skills, consider beginning with “attack-proofing,” and branching out from there.

Life is dangerous. So should you be. It is never too late to have a dangerous childhood.

 

Adapted from earlier material published on other Al Fin blogs